UOS – Probationers etc

Probations, Students, etc.
of the Synod of United Original Seceders
1852-1956


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ALLAN, JOHN FORSYTH

 

Background
He was born in Airdrie, Lanarkshire, on 7th November, 1848, the son of Alexander Allan, tile maker, and Janet Forsyth.

Education
He attended Glasgow University for three years, 1873-1876; and St Bee’s Episcopal Theological College.

Marriage
His marriage to Hannah Jenkinson was registered in the 1st quarter of 1880 in Cockermouth, Cumberland, England. Her birth was registered there in the 4th quarter of 1859. She was born in Stainburn, there, the daughter of John and Mary Jenkinson.

Ministry
On 29th November, 1881, it was reported to Glasgow Presbytery by Alexander J. Yuill, Laurieston, Glasgow, that John Forsyth Allan of his congregation wished to be admitted as a preacher. He had attended Glasgow University for three years 1873-1876; and St Bee’s Episcopal Theological College, Cumberland, England. He had served as missionary for seven years and presented certificates from “McIndoe, Paisley; Proudfoot of the city Poorhouse; and J. Campbell then of Airdrie, now Kirkcaldy”. A Committee was appointed to examine him and report.

On 27th December, 1881, they reported that they could not recommend Allan for admission as a preacher but they could examine him again to determine his status as a student. But the Presbytery examined him about his church connection over the last few years “and the replies he gave having been most contradictory and unsatisfactory,” it was moved that his application be set aside. No more is heard of him in the UOS records.

The “McIndoe, Paisley”, referred to was William McIndoe, Free Church Minister of Martyrs’, Paisley. This congregation had been a Burgher congregation which acceded to the Church of Scotland in 1839 and left it at the Disruption. The “J. Campbell” referred to was probably John Campbell, parish minister in Airdrie from 1875 till 1881, when he moved to Kirkcaldy. “Proudfoot of the city Poorhouse” was George Proudfoot, a minister of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, who served in the Glasgow Poorhouse from 1857 till 1896.

Death
His death was recorded in Calton, Glasgow, in 1897. His wife’s death was registered in Shettleston, Glasgow, in 1908.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Mary Clementina Allan whose birth was registered in the 3rd quarter of 1883 in Cardiff, Wales.

(2) John Jenkinson Allan whose birth was registered in the 1st quarter of 1885 in Cardiff, Wales.

(3) Reginald Albert Allan whose birth was registered in Calton, Glasgow, in 1888.

(4) Arthur Ernest Allan whose birth was registered in Calton, Glasgow, in 1890. His marriage to Jane McBride was registered in Shettleston, Glasgow, in 1913. He served as a private in 10th/11th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry. He died on 16th April, 1917, and was buried in Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France Plot: III. B. 14.

(5) Edith Letitia Allan whose birth was registered in Rutherglen, Lanarkshire, in 1892. Her death was registered in Shettleston, Glasgow, in 1910.

Source
Find a Grave


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ANDERSON, JAMES GIBSON

 

Background
He was born in Central Provinces, India, about 1873, the son of George Anderson, UOS missionary, and Agnes Gibson.

Education
He became a student under the supervision of the Glasgow Presbytery of the UOS Church on 25th June, 1889. On 24th September that year he was transferred to the supervision of the Edinburgh Presbytery as he intended to study at Edinburgh University.

Marriage
He married Janet Margaret Frame in 1909 in Gourock, Renfrewshire. At that time his residence was University Hall, Chelsea, London. He was a sub manager. She was born about 1882 in Larkhall, Lanarkshire, the daughter of Alexander Frame, draper, and Janet Cowper. In 1911 he was living at 26 Butler Avenue, Harrow, London, England; he was then an agency manager of a life assurance society.


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ANDERSON, JOHN

 

On 24th September, 1861, there is a reference in the Minutes of Glasgow Presbytery to John Anderson in his third year of studies. But these must be his University studies for on 1st December of that year the Presbytery examined him in Greek (Homer, Books 12-13); John’s Gospel; Latin (Virgil’s Aeneid Books 1-2); also in Logic, Moral Philosophy and Mathematics, with a view to him being admitted to the Hall. He displayed “great proficiency in Classical and Hellenistic literature” and on 3rd June, 1862, he was duly accepted for the Hall. But then he disappears from the UOS records.

There is a real possibility that he graduated B.A. from Glasgow University in 1861 and that he was the brother of David Anderson who became a minister of the Church of Scotland (FES, Vol.2, p.85) – but we will add further details when we are sure.


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AULD, WILLIAM

 

Background
He was born about 1845 in Scotland.

Education
He first appeared before the Glasgow Presbytery on 7th January, 1863. He was from Shottsburn, was attending Glasgow University, and was doing Latin in his first year. But his studies were interrupted and it was noted on 15th May, 1865, that he had not studied that year, nor had he attended Presbytery. He was mentioned in the Presbytery records from time to time thereafter until on 4th April, 1870, he was reported to be a first year student in the Hall. On 16th December, 1870, he was transferred to the superintendence of the Ayr Presbytery, being missionary in the Ayr congregation. He had for a time also to preach one Sabbath a month in Kilmarnock. On 18th September, 1872, he was transferred back to the Glasgow Presbytery and on 3rd December, 1872, trials for licence were appointed for him by that Presbytery. In February, 1873, he was strongly advised to attend an elocution class. In April, it was agreed to seek the Synod’s concurrence in his being licensed on condition that he covenant at the earliest possible opportunity. The Synod concurred. Finally, on 16th October, 1873, he was licensed by Glasgow Presbytery.

Marriage
He married Mary about 1882. She was born in Co. Cavan, Ireland, about 1853. This may have been Mary Gamble – certainly William Auld was brother-in-law of John W. Gamble, an Irish Secession minister who was brought up in the Coronary area.

Ministry
On 25th April, 1876, Glasgow Presbytery were advised that the Coronary congregation, Presbytery of Monaghan, Ireland, had presented a call to him. The Presbytery asked for the necessary paperwork to be provided from Ireland; and on 9th May, 1876, they put the call into Auld’s hands and he accepted it. He was then transferred to the Irish Presbytery.

Death
He took ill when preaching on 4th April, 1920, and died on 27th April. He was buried in the graveyard there.

Family
There is no clear evidence that they had issue.

Source
Byers Families


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BABINGTON, MATTHEW

 
Background
He was born in Kilwinning, Ayrshire, on 15th April, 1877, the son of Robert Babington, baker, and Elizabeth MacFarlane.

Education
He attended Irvine Academy, Ayrshire. He graduated from Glasgow University: M.A. in 1900; B.D. 1903. He first appeared before the Ayr Presbytery for examination as a student on 31st May, 1897. The last mention of him in the records of the Presbytery was on 16th May, 1899.

Marriage
He married Anne Arnot Bell or Whyte in Glamis, Angus, on 5th May, 1927. She was born in Newtyle, Angus, in 1880, the daughter of David Bell, farmer, and Margaret Soot. She married Alexander Whyte in 1908 in Newtyle, Angus. After Matthew Babington’s death, she married George Ballingall in 1954 in St Andrews and St Leonards, Fife.

Ministry
He became a minister in the Church of Scotland. He was licensed by the Presbytery of Irvine in 1903. He was ordained in Toward, Argyll, on 29th September, 1909. He demitted this charge on 3rd October, 1916, and served as an assistant in St Mary’s, Dundee, 1916-1919. He was settled in Glamis, Angus, on 18th December, 1919.

Death
His died in Dundee on 7th June, 1942. His wife’s death was registered in 1968 in Newtyle and Nevay, Angus.


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BOYD, WILLIAM

 

Background
He was born about 1841.

Education
He studied at Magee College, Londonderry, Ireland. In 1866 he obtained First Prize in the Logic, Rhetoric, and Belle Lettres Class; also, First Prize in the Methaphysical Class. In 1864 he was certified by the Presbytery of Ayr as ready for studies in the Divinity Hall.

Ministry
He was licensed on 18th December, 1866. On 6th March, 1867, a call to him to Mains Street, Glasgow, as assistant and successor to Matthew Murray, was sustained by the Glasgow Presbytery.

Death
He died at Ballyclough, Aghadowey, County Derry, Ireland, on 9th June, 1867, while under call to Mains Street, Glasgow. He was “a young man of excellent talents, high attainments in literature, great industry, and an eloquent preacher.”

Sources
Glasgow Herald, 8th March, 1867; 20th June, 1867


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BROCKET, ROBERT JAMES ARCHIBALD

 

Background
He was born on 22nd June, 1872, in Shotts, Lanarkshire, the son of Robert Brocket, mineral borer, and Margaret White. His father was an elder in the Shottsburn congregation.

Education
He appeared before the Glasgow Presbytery on 31st January, 1893, and was introduced as one that wished to study for the ministry. He was encouraged to prosecute his studies. He dropped out. His death record says that he was a mineral borer.

Death
His death was registered in 1928 in Hillhead, Glasgow, and he was buried on 1st October, 1928, in Shotts, Lanarkshire.

Family
He never married.


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BUCHANAN, JAMES

 

Education
On 24th September, 1878, he was presented to the Glasgow Presbytery as a student from the Mains Street congregation, in the second year of his Arts course at Glasgow University. By 1880 he was clearly having some difficulties and he fades from the picture. So who was he?

The only relevant Glasgow student I could find in 1881 was a 28 year old, living with his sisters Agnes and Jessie. This corresponds to the James Buchanan who graduated M.A. from Glasgow University in 1884. He was born in Glasgow on 5th December, 1852, the son of William Buchanan and Janet McGilivray.

He was connected firstly with the Hydepark Locomotives Works in Glasgow, and then with the North British Loco Co,. Ltd. He lived briefly at 8 Radnore Terrace, Glasgow. From 1886-96 he lived at 182 Hill Street, Garnet Hill, Glasgow. From 1896 till at least 1925 he lived at 12 Hamilton Drive, Pollokshields, Glasgow, of which house he was the proprietor.


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CARRUTHERS, JOHN GRAHAM

 

Background
He was born in Applegarth, Dumfries-shire, about 1815, the son of John Carruthers, farmer, and Margaret Graham. (There was a John Carruthers born (or baptised) there on 12th September, 1816, the son of John Carruthers, mother’s name not stated.)

Marriage
He married Jane Robertson on 30th September, 1889, at the Free Church Manse, Troon, Ayrshire (Registration: 1889 590/2 11 Troon). He was then described as a missionary of the OS Church residing at 1 York Street, Newton, Ayr. She was then of Buckingham Terrace, Ayr. She was born about 1834 in Edinburgh, the daughter of Thomas Robertson, wood merchant, and Jane Dodds.  For a brief account of some ministerial relationships, see under John Robertson.

Ministry
On 6th April, 1881, the Edinburgh Presbytery received a petition from John G. Carruthers, a preacher in connection with the Presbyterian Church of Canada, then residing in Lockerbie, for admission to the UOS Church. A minute certified to the excellence of his character and his standing as a regularly licensed preacher. Thomas Hobart, Carluke, was commissioned to make further enquiries and to report. On 2nd May, Hobart presented further certificates in regard to Carruthers, and the petition was remitted simpliciter to the Synod. The Synod remitted it back to the Presbytery enjoining them to make further enquiries and to admit him if they saw fit. The Synod also appointed men from other Presbyteries to help the Edinburgh Presbytery with that matter.

At the Presbytery on 24th May, there were further testimonials from people in Carluke and Glasgow who knew Carruthers – one of them had often heard him preach. He himself then preached from Matthew 16:26: “What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world but lose his own soul?” The Presbytery expressed themselves as “thoroughly satisfied with Mr Carruthers and their gratification at their receiving him among them.” He was accordingly licensed.

But just a year later it was reported that he was labouring under mental derangement and it was recognised that he could only be given occasional appointments to preach. Nonetheless, he was still preaching a good number of years later. A Report to the Synod in 1887 said: “Carruthers obtained a number of appointments during the year which he readily fulfilled; and Ministers are reminded that his services are at their disposal.” Similarly, three years later: “Mr. Carruthers has been employed occasionally in giving supply to vacant pulpits, and his services are available by any minister requiring assistance.”

Death
He died in Ayr in 1897. His wife died there in 1900.

Family
They had no issue.


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COLVIN, WILLIAM

 

Background
He was born on 11th March, 1845. He was connected with Bushmills Church, County Antrim, Ireland.

Education
He studied at Queen’s College, Belfast, Ireland. He gained the B.D., and LL.D. degrees.

The case of this man was brought to the attention of Ayr Presbytery by Ebenezer Ritchie, Toberdoney. He attended the Divinity Hall and appeared before the Presbytery with a view to being recognised as a student of the UOS Church. The Presbytery then discovered that he was not in fact a member of the UOS Church. He was recommended to become a member and his examination was postponed. But when a meeting was scheduled he could not attend because he was attending classes at the University of Belfast. He promised to be available before the start of the next session of the Divinity Hall. However, having attended the UOS Hall in 1867, he then attended New College, Edinburgh, for the 1869-70 session. The Synod in May, 1870, then instructed the Presbytery of Ayr that, if satisfied with Mr. Colvin’s reasons for not attending recent sessions of our Hall, they be authorised to certify him to the Hall Committee, after having passed the customary examinations, as a regular student of the third year. However, he was not happy that he was treated as a third year student rather than a fourth year student and, on that ground, he withdrew from the denomination, according to the minutes of Ayr Presbytery of 20th June, 1870.

Marriage
He married Mary about 1884. She was born about 1865 in Londonderry City, Ireland.

Ministry
He was licensed by the Presbytery of Route on 25th July, 1871. He was ordained in the Irish Presbyterian Church at Derramore, Limavady, on 23rd December, 1873. He served in Gortnessy, Fahan, County Donegal, 1881-1884. On 1st May, 1884, he was translated to Connor, County Antrim, from where he retired on 1st May, 1914.

Death
He died in 1926.

Family
They had issue:

(1) Howard Colvin born about 1886 in County Antrim, Ireland. In 1911 he was a student,

(2) Andrew Rosborough Colvin born about 1891 in County Antrim, Ireland. In 1911, he was a student.

Source
Derramore.


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FAULDS, JAMES

 

Background
He was born on 3rd April, 1876, at 2 Carnarvon Street, Glasgow, the son of James Faulds, a paper maker from near Bowling, Dunbartonshire, and Jessie Lambie Brown.

Education
He attended “first a school in the suburbs, and later a large school in the city.” He entered Glasgow University in 1893 and graduated M.A. with Honours in Classics in 1899 – his name is recorded as James Faulois on the Glasgow University on line record. He then spent one year as tutor in a large boarding school and a second year as secretary to a congregational minister in England, a nephew of Dr Alexander McLaren of Manchester.

On 1st September, 1896, he was introduced to the Glasgow Presbytery by the minister of Pollokshaws as a 3rd year Arts student, wishing to study for the ministry. He was received under the Presbytery’s inspection. But on 7th June, 1898, it was reported that he could not attend the Divinity Hall in the ensuing session and on 24th April, 1900, the Presbytery heard that he did not want to be regarded as a student any longer.

In 1901 he entered on a theology course in the United Free Church College in Glasgow.

Marriage
He married Mary Lawrence Adams Jeffrey on 1st May, 1908, in Victoria College Chapel, Toronto University, Ontario, Canada. She was born in August, 1882, Ontario, her father being from the West Indies and her mother from Quebec, Canada.

Ministry
He emigrated to Canada and worked for six months in Tu’Appelle Valley, 500 miles west of Winnipeg. There he was ordained. Thereafter he served for a year and a half in the Presbyterian Church of Marneora, near Toronto, Ontario. He was assistant in the Brick Presbyterian Church, Rochester, New York, USA, from 13th October, 1907, till 15th July, 1910.

In 1911 they lived at 62 Prince Arthur, Toronto North, Ontario. At the time of WW1 he lived at Arnprior, Ontario, Canada. In 1920 he was living with his wife in Cornwall Town, Glengarry Stormont, Ontario, and he was a Presbyterian minister. Till at least 1950 he was minister of Knox United Church, in Cornwall, Ontario.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Helen Hamilton – an adopted daughter, born about 1908 in Ontario, Canada.

(2) Margaret Faulds born about 1911 in Ontario, Canada.

(3) Frances Faulds born about 1919 in Ontario, Canada.

Sources
Gleaner

The Brick Church


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FORREST, JAMES

 

Education
He was received as a student for the ministry by the Glasgow Presbytery on 7th June, 1853. On 5th February, 1856, the Presbytery appointed trials for licence for him. At that point, he disappears from the records.


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FORSYTH, JOHN H.

 

Background
As a student with the Reformed Presbyterian Church, he was said to be from Wishaw, Lanarkshire. There was a John Forsyth in the 1851 census; he was 25, a student, born in Stonehouse, Lanarkshire, but resident at Low Wishaw in the parish of Cambusnethan, the son of Robert Forsyth, master cooper, and his wife Elizabeth who was born in Old Cumnock, Ayrshire, about 1797. The most likely death record of this lady, shows her to have been Elizabeth Forsyth or Houston, who died in 1863 in Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire, mother’s maiden surname Brown. There was an Elizabeth Houston born to John Houston and Margaret Brown in Old Cumnock in 1797.

There is therefore a distinct possibility that John H. Forsyth was John Houston Forsyth. There was a person of that name who was a teacher in a school in Garnkirk Fireclay Works, Cadder, Lanarkshire, around 1858 to 1861. In the 1871 census he was still there.

Education
He studied intermittently in the Reformed Presbyterian Hall in 1854 and 1857, but the Presbytery refused to sustain his studies.

It was reported to the Glasgow UOS Presbytery at their meeting on 12th April, 1871, that John H. Forsyth, a student of Theology in the Reformed Presbyterian Church desired admission as a student. He was advised that he should become a member of the church and the Synod could then pronounce on his status. He clearly became a member of the UOS because at their meeting, on 12th April, the Presbytery asked him for his Arts certificate and for details of his studying in the Reformed Presbyterian Hall, where he had studied for three years. They referred his case to the Synod in May, 1871, which instructed the Presbytery of Glasgow to examine him and admit him as a 4th year student, if they were satisfied with him. After another reference to Synod, because he had not engaged in Covenanting, trials for licence were set and he was duly licensed on 4th June, 1872.

Marriage
He married Agnes Frazer McKenzie. She was born (or baptised) on 13th August, 1834, in Glasgow, the daughter of Peter McKenzie, engraver, and Jane Lindsay McKnight.

Ministry
On 6th April, 1875, a call to him was presented at the Glasgow Presbytery from Culnady congregation via the Markethill Presbytery of the Secession Synod in Ireland. It was signed by 74 members and 27 ordinary hearers. The congregation promised £60 annual stipend, and the Presbytery stated that there was a £40 annual supplement from the Mutual Assistance Fund. The call was accepted.

Later he was minister of Vinecash Presbyterian Church, Portadown, Armagh, Ireland.

In 1901 John H. Forsyth was living in Ballintaggart, Richhill, Armagh, Ireland. He was 67, a widower, a Presbyterian minister, General Assembly. He was living with two daughters Jemima E. Forsyth, 42, and Agnes P. Forsyth, 40. All were born in Scotland.

In 1911 John Houston Forsyth was living at Ardenlee Avenue, Ormeau, Down, Ireland. He was then 74, a minister of the Presbyterian Church, General Assembly, born in Lanarkshire, Scotland. He was living with his daughter Jemima Jane Eliza Forsyth, 46, born in Lanarkshire, Scotland.

Death
He died on 30th May, 1914, at 30 Ardenlee Avenue, Belfast, Ireland. His wife died on 25th November, 1870, in Cadder, Lanarkshire (Registration: 1870 626/A2 61 Cadder (Eastern)).

Family
He had issue including:

(1) Jemima Jane Eliza Forsyth born in Cadder, Lanarkshire, about 1855.

(2) Agnes Lindsay P. Forsyth born in Cadder, Lanarkshire, in 1857.

Sources
Couper, The R.P. Church, p.167

Scotland’s Places

Eddie’s Extracts


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FRAME, JOHN

 

There is a reference to a John Frame, student, in the Minutes of the Glasgow Presbytery in 1865. According to the Glasgow University records there was a John Frame who graduated from Glasgow University, M.A. (1868); B.D. (1871). He was a native of Hamilton, Lanarkshire; and a licentiate of the United Presbyterian Church, but he died on 10th May, 1873.

He was probably the son of John Frame, weaver, and Agnes More.


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GRAY, DAVID

 

Background
He was born in January, 1842, and baptised on 24th April that year in the Pathhead Associate Church, Fife, the son of James Gray, brewer, and Fidelia Gray. His mother was the daughter of Thomas Gray, Secession minister from Haddington, East Lothian, who had been minister of this congregation – see here in the General Index of Scottish Presbyterian Ministers and scroll down to “Gray, Thomas: 1802, Pathhead”. This Fidelia Gray had a sister, Euphemia Gray, who married James Aitken Wylie, a former UOS minister who joined the Free Church at the Union of 1852.

Education
In May, 1868, it was reported that he had been appointed missionary in Ayr and he had expressed his intention to study for the ministry. The Presbytery therefore took him under their supervision. However, he remained the missionary in Ayr until October, 1870, and it was not till 1871 that it was noted that he had attended his first year of Arts at Edinburgh University. In Edinburgh he was appointed missionary in a part of the Pleasance area of the city. He was employed at the usual rate of £45 annually. He served in two spells in Edinburgh but by 1873, he was again missionary in Ayr and again came under the supervision of the Ayr Presbytery.

On 25th January, 1876, he was transferred from the Ayr to the Glasgow Presbytery. On 22nd May, 1876, it was noted that the Synod had authorised Glasgow Presbytery to license Gray on the condition that he study one more year in the Hall. Gray had written to say that he did not want licence under the terms laid down by the Synod and the Presbytery asked Gray to appear for examination. On the next occasion, Gray did not appear and a Committee was appointed to converse with him. However, he appeared at the Presbytery on 1st August, 1876; was examined and duly licensed.

Marriage
He married Helen Ritchie on 2nd May, 1876, at the bride’s home, 18 Green Street, Ayr. She was born in Redgorton, Perthshire, about 1842, the daughter of David Ritchie, engineer, and Joan Stewart. She was a grand daughter of Ebenezer Ritchie of Colmonell, according to Small’s History.

This is not so: David Ritchie and Johanna (or Joan) Stewart married in 1833 in Redgorton. By that date Ebenezer, the minister, was 31 and had been married for only six years, therefore, this David could not have been his son. More likely he is the David Ritchie who was born in Tibbermore in 1808, the son of Ebenezer Ritchie and Helen Greig, that is, he was Ebenezer, the minister’s, brother. In 1841, this David Ritchie and his family were in Methven, Perthshire, adjacent to Ebenezer and Hellen, who are old enough to be his parents. In fact, an “Ellen Ritchie 6” appears with Ebenezer the minister and his wife in 1851 and is described as a niece, born Redgorton.

Ministry
He wrote Glasgow Presbytery on 27th November, 1877, saying that he declined to fulfill appointments in certain vacancies. He declined to attend the Presbytery on 25th December, 1877, but wrote saying he intended to leave the UOS Church and requested his certificate of licence. He attended the next meeting on 29th January, 1878, as requested. He said that he still favoured UOS principles but wanted to leave “on the ground of want of ministerial success in not getting a call.” He was given his certificate of licence.

In May, 1878, the General Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church accepted him as a probationer. His reason for leaving the UOS Church was that he considered there was no sufficient ground for keeping up divisions in the Church by standing out on points which are obsolete or ought to be made open questions.

He was ordained in Burra, Shetland, on 12th June, 1884.

Death
He died in Burra, Shetland, in 1901. His wife died there on 7th March, 1894.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) James Gray born about 1877 in Ayr. In 1901 he was a marine engineer.

(2) Mary Gray born about 1878 in Ayr.

(3) Thomas Gray born about 1880 in Maryhill, Glasgow.

(4) Clementina Gray born about 1883 in Maryhill, Glasgow,

(5) Helen Ritchie Gray born on 27th November, 1885, at the United Presbyterian Manse, Burra, Shetland.

Sources
1884, Burra (United Presbyterian), Small, History, Vol.2, p.659; Call, Small, History, Vol.1, p.150; Call, Small, History, Vol.1, p.410; Family, Small, History, Vol.2, p.359

The Scotsman, Edinburgh, 21st May, 1878, p.3

Halcrow1

Halcrow2


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HOWE, ANDREW YOUNGSON

 

Background
He was born on 4th March, 1928, in Dundee, the son of John Howe, UOS minister there, and Jeanne Lawrence.

Education
He attended school in Dundee, 1933-44. He studied at St Andrews University, 1951-57. He was a divinity student of the UOS church at the time of its accession to the Church of Scotland in 1956.

Marriage
He married Dorothy Allison Thomson on 27th August, 1957, in Dundee. She was born on 10th October, 1933, in St Andrew, Dundee, the daughter of John Malcolm Thomson and Mary Bell.

Ministry
He was licensed by the Church of Scotland Presbytery of Dundee on 9th April, 1957. He was ordained in Farr, Sutherland, on 11th September, 1957. This congregation was linked with Altnaharra on 27th June, 1963. He was translated to Rosskeen, Ross and Cromarty, on 23rd April, 1969. He retired from the ministry on the grounds of ill health on 31st December, 1989.

Death
He died on 15th June, 2004, in hospital in Inverness, his home being Bredon Cottage, 2 Springfield Terrace, Alness, Ross and Cromarty. His wife died at the Rosskeen Manse on 9th September, 1988.

Family
They had issue.

Sources
FES, Vol.10, p.384

rghfhome


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HUNTER, ANDREW

 

Background
He was born about 1845 in Ayr, the son of John Hunter, bookseller, and Margaret Reid.

Education
He was briefly under the oversight of the Glasgow Presbytery. In December, 1866, it was noted that he had not reported to the Presbytery as he should have and a Committee was appointed to look into the matter. The Committee reported that Hunter was undecided as to whether he would continue in the UOS Church and declined to meet with the Presbytery. It was agreed that nothing further should be done about the matter in the meanwhile.

He graduated M.A. from Glasgow University in 1871 and B.D. in 1873. He joined the United Presbyterian Church as a student.

Marriage
He married Jessie (or Janet) Burrell on 6th January,1874, at 208 Great Western Road, Glasgow (Registration: 1874 644/7 57 Milton). He was then a minister of the United Presbyterian Church living at 5 Gardner Street, Glasgow. She was born (or baptised) on 7th January, 1847, in Glasgow, the daughter of George Burrell, shipowner, and Janet (Jessie) Houston. Her sister Margaret Burrell married William Workman a minister of the Church of Scotland. For him, see the General Index of Scottish Presbyterian ministers here, and scroll down to “Workman, William: 1875, Irvine”.

Ministry
He received a call to Parkhead, Glasgow, and to Princes Street, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, but he chose Dalkeith, Midlothian, and was ordained there on 16th December, 1873. He joined the United Free Church at the Union in 1900.

Death
He died in 1915 in Dalkeith, Midlothian. His wife died in 1943 in Haymarket, Edinburgh.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) George Frederick Burrell Hunter born in 1878 in Dalkeith, Midlothian. He died in 1954 in Haymarket, Edinburgh.

(2) Andrew Edwin Hunter born in 1880 in Dalkeith, Midlothian. He married Amy Newton Miller in 1908 in Dalkeith, Midlothian. He died in 1952 in Falkirk, Stirlingshire.

(3) Jessie Houston Hunter born in 1882 in Dalkeith, Midlothian. She died in 1952 in Glencorse, Midlothian.

(4) Margaret Hunter born in 1884 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Sources
Small, History, Vol.1, p.563; History, Vol.2, p.106


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HUTCHISON, ROBERT E.

 
Background
He was born (or baptised) on 15th November, 1849, in Dunning, Perthshire, the son of Joseph Hutchison, plasterer, and Mary Eadie.

Education
He was a student under the Presbytery of Aberdeen and Perth. In May, 1874, it was reported that, owing to indisposition, he had been unable to complete his third session at the University but that he still wished to enter the Divinity Hall. The Synod instructed the Hall Committee to admit him subject to him having been satisfactorily examined by the Presbytery.

Marriage
He married Jane Haldane Skene on 7th November, 1878, at 10 Rose Street, Aberdeen. At the time of his marriage he was a probationer of the United Presbyterian Church and he was usually resident in Dunning, Perthshire. His wife was born on 25th May, 1853, in Aberdeen, the daughter of James Alexander Skene and Jemima Fowler Davidson. At the time of her marriage, her father was a staff surgeon in the Royal Navy, he was never married. He was a son of Charles Skene, minister of John Knox Church of Scotland, Aberdeen, FES, Vol.6, p.11. (Note that this source is incomplete inasmuch as it does not mention James Alexander Skene.) Jane Haldane Skene’s mother is described on Jane’s marriage record as “Jemima Davidson, now wife of James Warrack Robson, Clerk, Inland Revenue”, whom she married in 1862.

Ministry
He was licensed by the Presbytery of Aberdeen and Perth in 1877. But after a few months occasional preaching he declined to accept further appointments and withdrew from the UOS Church.

He was admitted to the United Presbyterian Church as a probationer in 1878. He was ordained in Shapinsay on 21st October, 1879. In July, 1887, he offered to go to Australia under the Colonial Board, but he was advised to continue in Shapinsay, Orkney. But later an agent of the Church in New South Wales undertook to pay his passage money and he presented his resignation from his charge. This was accepted on 18th September, 1888. He was inducted to Walchet New South Wales, by the Presbytery of New England.

Death
He died in 1919 at Mosman, New South Wales. His wife died on 5th October, 1919, at St Peter’s, New South Wales.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Haldane Mary Hutchison born in 1881 in Shapinsay, Orkney.

(2) Eric George Hutchison born in 1891 in Walcha, New South Wales. He died in 1964 in St Leonard’s, Sydney, New South Wales.

Sources
1879, Shapinsay (United Secession), Small, History, Vol.2, p.503

The Sydney Morning Herald, New south Wales, 19th November, 1919


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JOHNSTON

 
A man by the name of Johnston was introduced by John McKay, Bridgeton, Glasgow, to the Presbytery of Glasgow on 4th June, 1895, as a former licentiate of the United Presbyterian Church who wished to minister in the UOS Church. A Committee was appointed to meet with him. Next month it was reported that he wished to withdraw his application in the meanwhile.


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MACGREGOR, THOMAS

 

On 24th April, 1892, Thomas Matthew, Kilwinning, reported that Thomas MacGregor, a student in his congregation who had completed four years at Glasgow University, wished to attended the evening sessions of the Hall, as a hearer. It was agreed that he should inform the Convener of the Hall Committee. Who was this man?

Background
He was born in Maryhill, Glasgow, in 1870, the son of Robert MacGregor and Jane Curr. He was a first cousin of Duncan McKinnon, at one time a probationer of the UOS Church. Their mothers were sisters.

Marriage
He married Mary Liddell Mcleod on 13th April, 1904, at the Hotel Osborne, Glasgow. She was then living at Park Terrace, Kirkintilloch, Dunbartonshire. She had been born about 1874, the daughter of Donald Mcleod, printer and publisher, and Bethia Liddell.

Ministry
At the time of his marriage he was a minister of the Presbyterian Church of England in Heaton Chapel, Manchester, Lancashire, England.

He was later minister of Walker Memorial Church, Carnwath, Lanarkshire, from which church he resigned on 13th November, 1934 (The Scotsman, 14th November, 1934, p.8).

By 1942 they were living in Balerno, Midlothian.

Death
His wife died in 1959, the death being registered in Morningside, Edinburgh.

Family
They had issue whose births were all registered in Stockport, Lancashire, England, including:

(1) Bethia Liddell MacGregor in the 2nd quarter of 1905.She married James Boyd Longmuir in Carnwath, Lanarkshire, in 1934. He was a prominent Church of Scotland minister (Wiki). She died in Hawick, Roxburghshire in 2001.

(2) Jean Curr MacGregor in the 1st quarter of 1909. She married Owen H. Wicksteed in Carnwath, Lanarkshire, in 1934. She died in Darlington, County Durham, England, on 19th April, 2012, aged 103 (Jgpc).


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MCINNES, ALEXANDER

 

This is the description of a man who appears in the censuses consistently as a teacher – more especially as a language teacher. He is the only identifiable person who fits what is said in the UOS records about Alexander McInnes, for example, this man was teaching in the Liverpool area at the time that the Presbytery were dealing with Alexander McInnes, a teacher there.

Background
He was born in Glasgow about 1833, the son of Archibald McInnes, gatekeeper, and Ann? …? [names obscure].

Education
He appeared as a student under Glasgow Presbytery on 1st December, 1857. He reported that he was studying Logic and was asked to report on the lectures at the next Presbytery. Thereafter he reported to Presbytery and did the work prescribed by Presbytery in the normal way.

In May, 1859, the Home Mission Committee of Synod reported that they had wished to appoint him as a missionary in Balmullo, Fife. For some reason, the congregation turned down the offer. It is not clear why they did so, but there is no suspicion that they did so because of some aversion to the man appointed. There may have been some lack of communication: “In this your Committee still think they acted unwisely for the interests of the congregation and the cause in that quarter; but they believe that the matter had not been duly weighed in all its aspects, and perhaps the difficulties were increased by the Committee having no opportunity of explaining the matter fully to the congregation ere the appointment was made.”

It was not long, however, till another opportunity arose for him. A formal application was made by the congregation in Edinburgh for him to be appointed “to labour in their vicinity, more especially among those destitute families from which the Sabbath-school children are drawn”. The congregation pledged itself to pay £10 per annum towards the salary of the agent, while the Session agreed “to superintend the missionary operations, and afford the agent such aid in carrying it out as might lie in their power”. McInnes agreed to this arrangement; the time was fixed for his removal to Edinburgh, and “a copy of instructions duly furnished by the Committee”. But he then declined to engage in missionary work in Edinburgh or elsewhere for the time being, “having come to the conviction that, in his present state of health, all his time was requisite for the duties of the Hall and College classes during the winter”.

But on 6th September, 1859, the Presbytery took note that he had not been attending the Divinity Hall. It was not known why officially, but unofficially it was thought that he had resolved to return to his former situation for a while. On 3rd January, 1860, it was reported that he was now outwith the bounds of the Presbytery and that he had withdrawn from the church. It was decided to write him and ask for clarification.

On 6th March, 1860, the Presbytery received a lengthy letter from him, stating why he had withdrawn from his studies in order to return to teaching. He also promised to repay the £5 that he had received as a grant from the Students’ Fund. Two months later he wrote asking for certificates for the work that he had done under their direction. On 7th October, 1862, it was reported that McInnes was in Liverpool, Lancashire, England, and the Presbytery decided to ask him to pay back his grant as soon as possible. Finally, on 2nd December, 1862, the Presbytery received a letter from him, written in French. The Clerk read it out and provided a translation. It was agreed that no notice be taken of it as it “was disrespectful and insulting both in respect of matter and form to this Presbytery and to individual members.” And that seems to be the last mark he made in the UOS records.

Marriage
He married Elizabeth Cooper Burnside on 26th September, 1859, in Kelvin, Glasgow. She was born about 1838, the daughter of Robert Burnside, warper, and Anne Russell.

Career
In 1859 he was already a teacher. In 1861 he was a teacher in the Liverpool area. About 1868 he returned to the Glasgow area. By 1881, he was a teacher of languages and mathematics living at 226 Berkeley Street, Glasgow.

Death
His wife died in 1891 in Kelvin, Glasgow.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Grace McInnes born in the 2nd quarter of 1862 in West Derby, Lancashire, England.

(2) Archibald McInnes born in the 4th quarter of 1864 in West Derby, Lancashire, England.

(3) Elizabeth McInnes born in the 3rd quarter of 1866 in West Derby, Lancashire, England.

(4) Jessie Burnside McInnes born in 1868 in Govan, Glasgow.

(5) Alexander McInnes born in 1872 in Govan, Glasgow.

(6) Catherine McInnes born about 1877 Govan, Glasgow.

(7) Emma Owen McInnes born in 1879 in Kelvin, Glasgow.


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MACKAY, MURDO

 

The Edinburgh Presbytery on 27th July, 1896, received an application from Rev. Murdo Mackay, late missionary in Holyrood Free Church, Edinburgh, who had studied one year at the Free Church College, for admission to the UOS church with a view to being employed in Home missionary work. (He enrolled in New College, Edinburgh, 1890-91.) It was laid on the table, along with a number of Certificates and testimonials in his favour, till the next meeting. On 28th February, 1897, the Presbytery noted that four years of study were required and Mackay was only willing to do one more, therefore the Presbytery did not feel it should encourage Mackay or send in his application to the Synod.

There is a man of this name who appears in the 1891 census, living at 1 West Norton Place, and designated as a Free Church missionary. Ten years previously he was “a jobbing gardener (also art student)”. We are taking it that this is the man who applied to the UOS Presbytery.

Background
He was born about 1853 in Olrig, Caithness, the son of John Mackay, gardener in Olrig House, and Georgina Morrison.

Marriages
He married Hannah or Susannah Mckenzie at Torbreck, Rogart, Sutherland, on 15th June, 1879 (Registration: 1879 055/ 2 Rogart). She was born about 1850 in Rogart, Sutherland, the daughter of William Mckenzie, blacksmith, and Elspeth Mckay.

Occupation
At the time of his marriage he was a gardener in Falkirk. Thereafter he appears in the Post Office Directories at various addresses and with various designations in Edinburgh. In 1881 he lived at 12 Gladstone Place; in 1884 at 24 Argyle Place and he was a gardener. There follow a number of years where he has no designation. But by 1901 he has a business as a gardener and florist – The Vineyard, Morningside Park. Later the business was at 29a Merchiston Crescent and he lived at 11 Viewforth Gardens.

During this period he was actively identified with the formation of the Edinburgh Working Men’s and Women’s Christian Sabbath Society.

About 1905 he disappears from the Edinburgh PO Directory. He then went abroad.

Ministry
He returned from America about 1919 and became a minister of the Free Church of Scotland and had short ministries in Kincardine, Ross and Cromarty; Kilmuir Easter, Ross and Cromarty; Burghead, Moray; and Fort Augustus and Dores, Inverness-shire.

Death
He died of pneumonia on 23rd March, 1936, at 14 Ballifeary Road, Inverness (Registration: 1936 098/A 157 Inverness). “He was a man of strong convictions and expressed himself fearlessly on such subjects as Romanism and Sunday observance” (The Scotsman, 25th March, 1936, p.10).

He predeceased his wife. A possibility is that she died in 1951 in Inverness aged 101.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) John William Mackay born in 1880 in Newington, Edinburgh.

(2) William Mckenzie Mackay born in 1881 in Newington, Edinburgh.

(3) George Mackay born in 1883 in Newington, Edinburgh.

(4) Elspeth (Elsie) Mackay born in 1884 in Newington, Edinburgh.

(5) Georgina (Ina) Mackay born about 1886 in Edinburgh.

(6) Kenneth Mackay born about 1889 in Edinburgh.

(7) Christian Mackay born about 1892 in Edinburgh.


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MCKENZIE, ALEXANDER

 

Background
He was from Rogart, Sutherland.

Education
In May, 1871, there was brought before the Synod the application of Alexander Mckenzie, a student connected with the Free Church, who sought admission to the UOS Theological Hall, with the view of studying for the ministry. Matthew Murray, Mains Street, Glasgow, stated the case. It appeared that the applicant had nearly completed his arts course at Aberdeen University, and had produced satisfactory certificates attesting his attendance at the various classes and his diligence as a student. After conversation, it was agreed to remit the application to the Perth and Aberdeen Presbytery, within whose bounds Mr. McKenzie resided, with instructions to examine him on an early day, and, if satisfied, admit him to Church fellowship, and certify him to the Hall Committee for admission to the Divinity Hall accordingly.

The Presbytery found that he had attended Aberdeen University for three sessions, and that he was of irreproachable moral character. He had been examined by the Presbytery in some subjects but it was difficult to do this because of the distance at which he lived. Moreover, he had not attended his fourth session at the University, though he had given good reasons for this. However in May, 1873, it was reported that he had completed his University course.

The following year the Synod agreed to instruct the Perth and Aberdeen Presbytery to license him on receiving from him a solemn pledge that he would embrace the first favourable opportunity of renewing the Covenants and subscribing the Bond. He was therefore licensed by the Presbytery of Aberdeen and Perth on 6th August, 1874.

He cannot readily be identified thereafter.


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MCKINNON, DUNCAN

 

Background
He was born in Kilsyth, Stirlingshire, in 1855, the son of Donald McKinnon, dairyman, and Lilias Curr. He was a first cousin of Thomas MacGregor who was at one time interested in studying in the UOS Divinity Hall. Their mothers were sisters.

Education
He became known to the Glasgow Presbytery on 26th September, 1876, as a 2nd year student in Arts from Kirkintilloch who desired to be acknowledged by the Presbytery. Thereafter he was routinely examined by the Presbytery. On 4th June, 1878, he was certified as ready for the Divinity Hall. But there was obviously some concern over him because William B. Gardiner, Pollokshaws, was appointed to speak with him regarding his intentions. On 6th June, 1882, it was agreed that the Presbytery put to the Hall Committee the view that McKinnon be admitted to trials for licence at the end of his third year, given the protracted length of his studies and “the present exigencies of the Church”. Accordingly trials for licence were appointed for him on 1st August that year. On 28th November, 1882, he did not appear because of family bereavement. But it was believed he might not take licence till he had completed his degree – a course of action from which the Presbytery wished to dissuade him. It does not seem that they were successful because McKinnon himself asked that they delay his trials. He graduated M.A. from Glasgow University in 1883. Eventually on 5th June, 1883, he was licensed by the Presbytery of Glasgow.

Marriage
He married Jessie (or Janet) Gardner Archibald on 11th November, 1891, in Hardgate, Kirkintilloch, Dunbartonshire (Registration: 1891 498/ 63 Kirkintilloch). He was then a Free Church minister living at 3 Muirhead Street, Kirkintilloch. She was born in Stirling in 1857, the daughter of William Archibald, drysalter, and Jane Brown.

Ministry
He received a call from Dromore, Ireland, which was dealt with by the Presbytery of Ayr on 27th November, 1883. He asked for more time to consider the matter. But on 29th January, 1884, the Presbytery of Glasgow received two letters from McKinnon and a Committee was appointed to deal with the matter. The matter was clarified on 25th March: he had difficulties assenting to certain questions of the Formula and could not accept a call but would reconsider the matter and state his decision to the Committee. On 27th January, 1885, he did that: he wrote that “he had not been able to overcome his difficulties and that he has decided to take a situation.” The Presbytery wrote “expressing the hope that his difficulties might yet be overcome.”

Notwithstanding this, he received a call from the Kirkcaldy congregation which he declined to accept.

He was received into the Free Church in 1888 and became a Free Church minister: see here.

Death
His wife’s death was registered in 1944 in Portree, Isle of Skye, Inverness-shire.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Patrick Alexander McKinnon born in 1898 in Wanlockhead, Dumfries-shire.

(2) Catherine Jane McKinnon born in 1900 in Wanlockhead, Dumfries-shire.


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MACLEAN, A.

 

Education
A man Maclean appears as a student under Glasgow Presbytery on 2nd December, 1852. In 1856, the Synod instructed the Presbytery of Perth and Aberdeen to converse with Mr A. McLean, student in divinity, with a view to his being taken on trials for licence.

This may be Alexander Thomson Mclean who became a United Presbyterian minister – but that remains to be confirmed. See Small, History, Vol.2, p.135


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MCLEAN, CHARLES

 

Ministry
On 24th September, 1878, William F. Aitken, of Mains Street, Glasgow, introduced to the Glasgow Presbytery, Charles McLean, M.D., who had recently returned to Scotland from the USA. He wished to apply for admission to the UOS ministry. He presented certificates from the Arts course at Glasgow University; certification of his attendance at the Presbyterian College, Montreal; a certificate of his ordination as a minister of the gospel at Cleveland, USA, on 25th September, 1874, as a Baptist; and a diploma as a practitioner in surgery and medicine. He said he had been Free Church before going abroad; expressed regret at forming a connection with the Baptists. He was dissatisfied with the “unsatisfactory state of matters in the Free Church”. It was agreed to leave this matter over till 15th October and to invite brethren from other presbyteries to be present.

On 15th October, 1878, McLean produced further letters from Rev. Evan Gordon and Dr A. Bonar. The Moderator put to him the Questions of the formula, which were satisfactorily answered, after which he was formally declared to be admitted as a minister, and received the right hand of fellowship from all the brethren who were present

However, on 24h December, 1878, the Presbytery met pro re nata and in camera to consider a fama regarding Dr McLean.

Gardiner read a paragraph from the Reformed Presbyterian Advocate dated April, 1876, published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It alleged that, while under the care of the Reformed Presbytery of Philadelphia, Mclean had been charged with aggravated immoralities, which were well supported. So far the report from America. McLean was present and repudiated this “in the strongest and most solemn manner”. Nonetheless the Presbytery of Glasgow suspended McLean from any church work pending enquiry.

At the end of January, they continued McLean’s suspension pending yet further enquiry. McLean stated he wished no further connection with the UOS Church. Nevertheless enquiry continued. A letter from Cleveland stated they had no knowledge of a Charles McLean being ordained. A photo was also received from the USA, proving McLean’s identity with the man that had been disciplined by the Reformed Presbyterian Presbytery there. McLean meanwhile was thought to be officiating in a Baptist Church in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire. Finally, on 13th September, 1879, he was declared to be no longer a minister or member of the UOS Church.


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MACLEOD, RODERICK SAMUEL

 

The man whose life and ministry are described here is the man who appears in the 1901 census as a minister of the Presbyterian Church of Canada. This is what connects him with his dealings with the UOS church.

Background
He was born about 1847 in Lochs, Isle of Lewis, Ross and Cromarty, the son of Roderick McLeod, crofter, and Mary McAulay.

Education
In his and his wife’s death records, he claims to be a Free Church minister, so it is presumed that he studied under the auspices of the Free Church and was licensed by a Free Church Presbytery.

Marriage
He married Margaret Clark in 1883 in Kingussie and Insh, Inverness-shire. She was the daughter of Alexander Clark, forester deer, and Margaret Grant.

Ministry
He was ordained in Canada in 1889 – in Little Narrows, Nova Scotia.

But for whatever reason, he did not remain there long for on 4th August, 1891, Roderick S. MacLeod from the Presbyterian Church of Canada appeared before the Glasgow Presbytery in support of his application to be accepted as a minister of the UOS Church. He impressed them most favourably and a Committee was appointed to deal with him.

On 10th September, 1891, he presented a certificate of licence from the Presbytery of Victoria and Richmond. He had been ordained in the congregation of Little Narrows and resigned from there. He was asked by the UOS Presbytery of Glasgow to deliver a sermon on John 3:3: “Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” On 27th October, 1891, he withdrew his petition to be received as a UOS minister and asked for his papers back.

Death
He died of paraplegia on 14th October, 1912, at 167 Renfrew Road, Govan, his former residence being 25 Houston Street (Registration: 1912 646/2 1004 Govan). His wife died on 10th February, 1897, in Laggan, Inverness-shire (Registration: 1897 104/ 4 Laggan)

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Neil McKinnon McLeod born in 1886 in Partick, Glasgow.

(2) Margaret (Maggie) Isabel McLeod born in 1888 in Kingussie and Insh, Inverness-shire. She married John Brown in 1908 in St George, Edinburgh. She died in 1935 in Hillhead, Glasgow.

(3) William McKinnon McLeod born in 1891 in Kilmore and Kilbride, Argyll. He married Christina D. McNicol in 1925 in Pollokshields, Glasgow. He died in 1952 in Cathcart, Glasgow.

Source
Yearbook


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MAIN, ARCHIBALD

 
Background
He was born in Partick, Glasgow, on 17th December, 1876, the son of Archibald Main and Janet Kirkpatrick.

Education
He attended Garnethill School there.

He was first presented to the Glasgow Presbytery on 1st September, 1896, by William F. Aitken as a 3rd year Arts student wishing to study for the ministry and he was duly received under the Presbytery’s inspection. He graduated M.A. from Glasgow University in 1899 and gained the Snell Exhibition of £400. In June, 1900, the Presbytery heard that he was attending Oxford University and was not able to attend the UOS Hall. And nothing further is heard of him in the UOS records.

He gained his B.A. degree from Oxford in 1903. He was subsequently awarded by Glasgow University the following degrees: D.Litt. in 1912; D.D. in 1921; and LL.D. in 1943..

Marriage
He married Mary Jardine Giffen on 25th June, 1907, in Anderston, Glasgow. She was born in 1874, in Milton, Glasgow, the daughter of Andrew Giffen, horse dealer, and Mary McAuslan.

Ministry
He was licensed by the Church of Scotland Presbytery of Glasgow in 1903. He was ordained to St Madoes, Perthshire, on 28th April, 1904. He was translated to Old Kilpatrick, Dunbartonshire, on 9th May, 1912. He was admitted to the Chair of Ecclesiastical History, St Andrews, Fife, on 11th October, 1915. In 1918-19 he was Chaplain to the 52nd Division. He was admitted to the chair of Ecclesiastical History on 5th October, 1922. He demitted his chair and was admitted to Kirkbean, Wigtownshire, on 30th April, 1942. He demitted this charge on 13th February, 1946.

Death
He died in Glasgow on 14th March, 1947. His wife died in Dumfries in 1945.

Family
They had issue:

(1) Mary MacAuslan Main who married Robert Henderson Budge on 11th December, 1940, in Hillhead, Glasgow. He was minister of Selkirk West.

Sources
1904, St Madoes, FES, Vol.4, p.247; 1912, Old Kilpatrick, FES, Vol.3, p.355; 1915, Professor, St Mary’s, FES, Vol.7, p.434; 1922, Professor, Glasgow, FES, Vol.7, p.410FES, Vol.8, p.717


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MASTERTON, DAVID GRAHAM

 

Background
He was born in 1879 in New Monkland, Lanarkshire. He was the son of David Scott Masterton, F.E.I.S., teacher, and Mary Gardner Graham.

Education
On 5th April, 1910, D.G. Masterton, Longriggend, teacher, offered himself to the Glasgow Presbytery for mission work. He was sent the questions to be answered by students and ministers from other denominations seeking admission; and a committee was set up to interview him. On 3rd May, 1910, it was reported that the Committee had met with him and had advised him that “should he be prepared to give in his accession to the principles of the Church”, he should attend the Hall as a student of Theology. He had given in a paper expressing his approbation of the teaching of the Testimony. But his case was remitted simpliciter to the Synod. Meanwhile he was attending the Divinity Hall with a view to helping him make up his mind on the matter. Later that year the Hall Committee recommended that David Graham Masteron be recognised as a theological student of the first year. But his path to licence was not a smooth one.

Firstly, in January, as part of the Presbytery’s supervision of his studies he delivered a sermon on John 7:37: “In the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink.”. It was “unanimously agreed to ask him to reconstruct the discourse and to deliver it at a future meeting.”

Secondly, on 6th February, 1912, a Presbytery Committee was appointed to confer with him “in regard to the contents of letters he had sent to the clerk as to inter-sessional studies and the duration of his course of study”. The result was satisfactory and he was certified to the Hall as third year student.

Thirdly, he was admitted to the Hall as fourth year student but on condition that he would pass his Hebrew exam.

Marriage
He married Agnes Dawson Hendry on 24th December, 1918, at Claremont, Larbert, Stirlingshire (1918 485/A 52 Larbert). She was born there in 1882, the daughter of John Hendry, hotel keeper, and Mary McLaw.

Ministry
On 29th July, 1913, he was licensed by the Glasgow Presbytery. But his difficulties were not over. On 7th December, 1915, a committee of Presbytery was appointed “to deal with Mr Masterton, probationer under the inspection of the Presbytery, regarding an application which he had made for admission into the United Free Church in which the applicant declared that he had left the United Original Secession Church.” On 1st February, 1916, the correspondence with Masterton was laid on the table; approval was expressed regarding the way in which the committee had acted; and Masterton was cited to appear before making a final decision.

On 7th March, 1916, Masterton wrote declining to appear and it was agreed “that, as Mr Masterton has declined our jurisdiction, we formally declare him no longer under our Jurisdiction.” If he should appeal to Synod, a committee was appointed to draw up reasons for the decision. At the Presbytery on 2nd May, 1916, he laid on the table a protest against the Presbytery’s decision in his case. It was agreed to transmit it to the Synod if Masterton would state his reasons. But in the event, Masterton let his appeal drop.

However, on 3rd September, 1918, the Presbytery considered a letter from him asking to be received back into the church as a probationer. It was agreed “that the Presbytery cannot see their way to resile from decisions arrived at regarding Mr Masterton on 7th March, 1916.”

Death
He died on 9th August, 1943, at 25 South Broomage Avenue, Larbert, Stirlingshire. On his death certificate he was described as an Original Secession Church Minister. His wife died there in Larbert in 1946.

Family
There is no evidence that they had issue.

Source
The Mastertons


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MATHIE, JOHN

 

In July, 1872, he was a student of literature in his second year at Glasgow University and he was taken under the supervision of the Presbytery of Glasgow. References to him continue until September, 1876.

So who is this man?

Background
The most obvious conclusion is that he was the John Mathie who was born to John Mathie, cabinet maker, and Jane Park on 10th September, 1852. He was baptised on 21st October, 1852, in Glasgow Original Secession Church. His mother died in 1855. In 1881 he was a student of medicine living with his aunt, Janet Park, who was a Hall Keeper at 16 Douglas Street, Glasgow – that being the address of the UOS Divinity Hall and the place where the Presbytery of Glasgow frequently held their meetings.

Education
It is tempting to think that he was the John Mathie who graduated M.B., C.M. from Glasgow University in 1888 and who worked thereafter in Bilston, Staffordshire, England. In that case, his birth date given in the University records as 10th August, 1853, is wrong.

The John Mathie, physician, who was living in Bilston, in the censuses was recorded as John P. Mathie and he was married to Jean S. Mathie; and John Park Mathie married Jane Somerville Thomson in Blythswood, Glasgow, in 1884.

Death
A John Mathie died in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England, aged 76 in the 2nd quarter of 1929 and a Jean S. Mathie died there in the 4th quarter of 1947 aged 89. Bilston was in the Wolverhampton registration district.

Family
They had issue, all registered in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England, including:

(1) John Park Mathie born in the 1st quarter of 1885. His death was registered in Rowley Regis, Staffordshire, England, in the 1st quarter of 1960.

(2) Mary Miles Mathie born in the 1st quarter of 1887. She may have married Thomas H. Hill in the 1st quarter of 1925 in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England.

(3) William Sidney Mathie, born in the 1st quarter of 1888. He died of wounds received in action (Glasgow University Alumni.)

(4) George Cecil Mathie born in the 3rd quarter of 1889. He died in the 1st quarter of 1946 in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England.

(5) Frederick Douglas Mathie born in the 2nd quarter of 1891. He died in the 1st quarter of 1892.

(6) Dorothy Gladys Mathie born in the 3rd quarter of 1892. She may have married Bernard L. Holloway in the 3rd quarter of 1919 in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. They lived in the USA and raised a family there (New York Times).


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MUNRO, _____

He was a student under the Glasgow Presbytery: first mentioned on 4th February, 1862, when he was said to be in his second year. Last mentioned on 14th April, 1863.

This may be the Donald Munro who conducted a long running conflict with the UOS Church. For him, see here>/a>.


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RICHMOND, ROBERT H.

 

On 31st July, 1905, R.H. Richmond was accepted provisionally as a student by the Glasgow Presbytery. The Synod, the following May, noted that he had been received as a regular student. But in January, 1907, it was noted that he was unable to attend University that year on account of business and family affairs. In November that year a committee of Presbytery was appointed to meet with him “to converse with him as to his position and prospects as a student in connection with the church”. In January, 1908, the Committee reported and it was agreed “to inform Mr Richmond that he was no longer regarded as a student under the inspection of the Presbytery.” On 31st March, 1908, he wrote saying that he had decided to sever his connection with the church as a student, and his resignation was accepted.

There are several possibilities in regard to who this is, but a definite possibility is that he was Robert Hill Richmond who became a Church of Scotland minister: see here and scroll down to “Richmond, Robert Hill: 1920, Shapinsay”.


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SCOTT, DAVID

 

Education
On 1st December, 1861, the Glasgow Presbytery considered an application from David Scott that he should be taken on trials for licence. The Presbytery recognised that it was ultra vires (outwith their powers) to do so and referred the matter simpliciter (without any recommendation, one way or the other) to the Synod. He had done some studies already, including studies in the UOS Hall – but his undergraduate course was irregular and his attendance at the Hall had not been under the supervision of the Presbytery.

As a result of this, the Presbytery was instructed to examine him – which they did on 3rd June, 1862, and he was admitted to the Hall as a regular student. Thereafter he came under the supervision of the Presbytery in the normal way. He was licensed by the Glasgow Presbytery on 2nd June, 1863. However, on 5th December, 1865, he intimated to the Presbytery that he was resigning all connection with the UOS Church – because of conscientious convictions. These convictions had clearly to do with the Church’s stance that all her ministers had to take the Covenants at the earliest possible opportunity. The Presbytery asked him to reconsider his step but in a speech to the Presbytery on 6th February, 1866, he refused to withdraw and defended his convictions at length.

A week later, the Presbytery declared him to be no longer a preacher or member of the UOS Church. And they did so in no uncertain terms. “The following findings were unanimously adopted by the Presbytery as their decision upon the whole case: first, that Mr. David Scott’s intimation of having renounced all connection with the United Original Secession Church, while engaged as a preacher, and under the regular appointments of the Synod’s Committee of Supplies, without even submitting his difficulties to the Presbytery, in regard to the profession and practice of the Body anent Covenanting, or the terms of ministerial communion, to which he had so recently cordially assented at license, is irregular, and in violation of his solemn pledge, ‘to submit himself willingly and humbly in the spirit of meekness unto the admonitions of this Presbytery, agreeable to the Word of God, and to be subject thereunto in the Lord.’

“Second, that this violation of ecclesiastical law and order has been greatly aggravated by the reasons assigned and defended by Mr. Scott for this abrupt renunciation of all connection with the United Original Secession Church—namely, an imaginary supposition, that should he submit his difficulties the Presbytery would deal harshly and tyrannically with him in the exercise of discipline, while admitting that hitherto their conduct towards him had been uniformly kind and considerate. In consideration of the nature of Mr. Scott’s act of self-excision, as directed against the first principles of social obligation, and the baseless reasons assigned and defended for this act, this Presbytery feel constrained to express in the strongest manner their reprobation of conduct which, if it were general, would dissolve the bonds of society.

“Third, that seeing the Presbytery have used all diligence to remove Mr. Scott’s difficulties in regard to the professions which he has twice solemnly made in pledging himself to the Formula, and to induce him to withdraw his letter renouncing all connection with the United Original Secession Church, and seeing, moreover, that Mr. Scott maintains his own misinterpretations of the acknowledgment of sins in the face of all evidence to the contrary, and that he manifests a spirit which affords no reasonable ground to hope that he will be induced to abandon the unwarrantable position he has assumed, or submit his case in a regular way for the consideration of the Court to which he owes subjection in the Lord, the Presbytery, though it cannot accept of his self-excision, the act of resignation already condemned, yet feel constrained, in regard to his whole conduct in this matter, to declare, as they did and hereby do declare, Mr. David Scott no longer a preacher or member of the United Original Secession Church.”

He was David Scott who became a Free Church minister, having studied in the UOS Hall.


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SCOTT, JOHN B.

 

The UOS records tell of a John B. Scott who resigned as a probationer with a view to labouring in the colonial field. The following is the only person that I could find that fits that description.

Background
John Bain Scott was born on 28th March and baptised on 4th April, 1836, in Redgorton, Perthshire, the son of William Scott and Amelia Bain.

Education
He appears in the 1861 census as a divinity student, living with his family in Dundee.

Marriage
He married Margaret Elliott Moscrip on Wednesday, 17th March, 1875, in St Mary’s, Perth, Ontario, Canada. She was born in Ontario, Canada, about 1841, the daughter of someone Moscrip and his wife Margaret, who was born in Scotland.

Ministry
He was licensed by the Presbytery of Aberdeen and Perth on 25th September, 1861. At that stage he was connected with the Dundee congregation.

He informed the Synod in May, 1873, that it was his design to connect himself with another section of the Presbyterian Cburch, with a view to his labouring in the Colonial field. He tendered his resignation as a licentiate of the Church, and asked the Court to grant him the requisite disjunction certificate. His resignation was accepted and the necessary certificate granted. It was also agreed that, inasmuch as his connection with the Synod was thereby dissolved, the Committee of Supplies were instructed to cancel his appointments for May and June.

From 1881 till 1901 he shows as a Presbyterian minister in Leamington, Essex South, Ontario.

Death
His wife died sometime between 1891 and 1901. There is no sign of him in the 1911 census.

Family
They had issue including:

(1) Margaret Emily Scott born on 11 April, 1876, in Ontario, Canada.

(2) William Caven Moscrip Scott born about 1878 in Ontario, Canada.


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TYNDAL, JOHN

 
Background
He was born about 1807 in London, England, the son of David Tindal, master baker, and Margaret Henning?.

Education
He had been brought up in the Original Burgher Synod which entered the Church of Scotland in 1839. He was licensed by the Church of Scotland Presbytery of Lanark in 1838.

Ministry
“John Tindal, Lanark” was a name on the Roll of Probationers adhering to the Free Church. He functioned as a probationer within the Free Church. But he became disillusioned with the Free Church on various counts, not least their lack of attachment to the Second Reformation. He then became attached to what was known as the Associate Presbytery and occasionally occupied the pulpit of Lauriston Street, Edinburgh. He became dissatisfied with them and was excluded from membership on 19th October, 1868. He then preached in a hall for a time to a small number of supporters.

On 15th March, 1881, he petitioned the Edinburgh Presbytery of the UOS Church to be received as a preacher of the gospel. This was recommended favourably to the Synod and on 24th May, 1881, his petition was granted and he was duly licensed that day. He was employed as a salaried preacher to vacant congregations.

He appeared in the 1881 census in Edinburgh as a preacher and author. His services in occasional preaching were also mentioned from time to time in the Synod Reports. By 1885 the Report recorded that “his services have not been much called into requisition during the year.” He gave six weeks’ supply. In 1887 it was reported that he had not been able to preach often through growing infirmities. Two years later: “Owing to increasing age and infirmities Mr. Tyndal has been unable to take any appointments.”

Death
He died of heart affection on 12th May, 1895, at Broomhill Home, Kirkintilloch (Registration: 1895 498/ 145 Kirkintilloch).

Publication
Protest of John Tyndal to the Free Church Presbytery of Edinburgh, with the view of being forwarded to the General Assembly, May 1862

Family
He never married.

Sources
MacWhirter


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WALKER, SAMUEL

 

He studied Arts at Queen’s College, Cork, Ireland.

In 1885 he applied to the Presbytery of Ayr for permission to enter the Divinity Hall. He was then transferred to Edinburgh Presbytery in 1887, because he wass resident in Edinburgh during the winter months. He was regularly examined by that Presbytery and was ready for licence when difficulties arose. The Presbytery of Edinburgh, on 27th February, 1889, had conversations “in regard to the difficulties in the way of his taking licence in the usual way.” He was then asked if he could answer the questions unconditionally. “To the grief of all present Mr Walker expressed himself to the effect that he was not.” So they didn’t license him at that time because he could only answer the regular questions on conditions that the Presbytery was not able to accept.

After further dealings with him, he reported to the Presbytery on 18th March, 1889, that his difficulties had been so far removed that he was now prepared to receive license and he was therefore duly licensed. But the following year a Committee reported with deep regret that Mr. Samuel Walker had intimated to the Committee that he would cease taking appointments from the fourth Sabbath of January, [1890,] as he had resolved to leave for one of the Colonies.