McCosh

The Wheat and the Chaff gathered into Bundles

 

by James McCosh

 

The blog, Disruption Defaulters, explains what this book is and why excerpts are published here.

This book was written shortly after the Disruption when the events leading up to the Disruption were still clearly in the minds of the general public. Nowadays, some of what McCosh says is unclear except to those familiar with the details of the controversy. In particular, McCosh mentions the voting record in the General Assembly of those who seemed to support the Evangelical side but who did not in fact come out at the Disruption – the measures they supported. This is not the place to give a history lesson on the years leading up to the Disruption. But researchers can find a general presentation of the history during this period in Brown’s, Annals of the Disruption, Chapter 4 and Chapter 5.

The following documents mentioned in McCosh’s book are also available on line:



 

Adamson, John

Newton

Was not a supporter of the Church’s views in regard to non-intrusion, but held the doctrine of her spiritual independence. He was one of those who approved of Lord Aberdeen’s bill in 1840. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.24)


Allan, Robert

Little Dunkeld

A keen and forward supporter of the Evangelical side, professing anti-patronage sentiments. In 1838, concurred in the ordination of Mr Kessen, and was rebuked at the bar of the Court of Session. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Was a member of convocation, and adhered to the first series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.61)


Anderson, James

Cults

A keen supporter of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. In the end of March 1843, formally withdrew his adherence by letter, and went over to the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.73)


Anderson, Thomas

Crawford

Uniformly voted and acted with the Evangelical side. Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, and in that of 1841 voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.49)


Baird, John

Yetholm

A very keen and decided maintainer of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and inclining broadly to anti-patronage views. He subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill in 1840, and up to the movement of the Forty, to which he became a party, uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.30)


Balfour, Lewis

Colinton

Did not occupy a very prominent place in the oontroversy, but always professed to belong to the Evangelical party, and uniformly acted with them. He was in the Assembly of 1833, and then supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures and motion on calls, which in the following year resulted in the Veto Act. Subsequently he supported the Veto itself, and the independence of the Church. He was present at the Convocation in November 1842, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.18)


Balfour, Peter

Clackmannan

A keen advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and a steady supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions, but opposed the second, and never afterwards co-operated with his former party, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.66)


Barclay, Robert

Lunan

Always acted with the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but was candid enough to declare that he “would not suffer for them.” Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. Repented by the next day of having done so, and wished the Clerk privately to withdraw his name; but, as this could not be done, lacked moral resolution to make a formal application to that effect. Did not, however, forget to apply for and pocket his expenses from the Convocation Fund. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.78)


Barr, James

Port Glasgow

From the outset of his incumbency an ardent, zealous, and conspicuous partizan of the extreme section of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1835, he voted in favour of the chapel act, the veto act, and against the settlement of Young, the presentee to Auchterarder; and in 1840 he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the earlier stages of the controversy he frequently took part in public meetings, and spoke strongly against patronage and in support of the spiritual independence of the Church. Declares his sentiments to be now in all respects the same as ever they were, but has latterly used the platform and the press against his former party with at least as much zeal as ever he did in support of them. Since the disruption, has been presented to St Enoch’s, Glasgow, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.46)


Barry, John

Shapinshay

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly and earnestly supported the Evangelical side. It is believed that he would have joined the Free Church had he not unfortunately been, both before and since the disruption, incapacitated from taking any part in public affairs. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.105)


Begg, James

New Monkland

Throughout his long incumbency a constant and forward supporter of the Evangelical side, holding anti-patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1834, he supported the veto, and the admission of the chapel ministers, and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and the solemn Engagement. In the Assembly of 1842, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.47)


Begg, William

Falkirk

A loud and vehement assertor of the most extreme principles of the Evangelical party. In 1840, he subscribed the solemn Engagement. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.22)


Bennet, Andrew

Closeburn

A keen, active, and zealous professor of the principles of the extreme section of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1836, he supported the anti-patronage resolutions; in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.37)


Bennie, Archibald

Lady Yester’s,

Throughout belonged to what may be called the extreme section of the Evangelical party. He held anti-patronage principles, opposed Lord Aberdeen’s bill, subscribed the declaration against it, and likewise the solemn Engagement in defence of the liberties of the Church. Generally he bore a very marked and prominent share in the agitation in behalf of the principles maintained by his party; and, in particular, it may be mentioned that he took part in one or more of the series of lectures delivered in Edinburgh in elucidation of these principles, and afterwards published. Latterly, he gradually drew off; and although present at one diet of the Convocation, he did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.19)


Bethune, Hector

Dingwall

Gave an irregular but not very hearty support to the Evangelical cause. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and about a year ago, seconded an overture against patronage in the Synod of Ross. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and the solemn Engagement. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.96)


Black, William

Barony

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side, professing strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and originally inclined to favour anti-patronage sentiments, having supported the late Dr McGill’s overture on the subject in 1834. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto act and the chapel act, and again in that of 1835; and, in the latter year, likewise voted against the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Has repeatedly declared that he could not remain in the Establishment if non-intrusion and spiritual independence were not conceded. Latterly joined the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.53)


Blyth, Thomas

Birsay and Harray

A very keen and zealous partizan of the Evangelical cause, holding anti-patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1838, he supported the independence resolutions; and in that of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. He adhered to both series of the Convocation resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.104)


Boyd, Alexander

Crimond

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and lent a general, but cautious and guarded, support to the measures of the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.87)


Boyd, James

Ochiltrees

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. A uniform and active supporter of the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Branks, William

Camelon

Professing the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but cautiously avoiding any forward or decided advocacy of them. Since the disruption he has obtained a presentation to the parish of Torphichen. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.22)


Brewster, Henry

Farnwell

Generally supported the Evangelical cause, and professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but never took very high ground in their behalf. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.80)


Brewster, Patrick

Abbey, Paisley

A leader amongst the moral force Chartists, and under libel on the charge of preaching seditious sermons. Did not hold the doctrine of spiritual independence, and could not be said to be allied to the Evangelical side by anything more than his opposition to patronage, which, on his part, was probably as much of a political as a religious principle. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.45)


Bromfield, Robert Orange

Auldfield

Professed to entertain the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but very irregular and uncertain in his support of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Since the disruption has obtained a presentation to the parish of Sprouston, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.45)


Brotchie, James

Westray and Papa Westray

A strenuous assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1842, he supported the anti-patronage resolutions and Claim of Rights; and generally extended an unwavering support to all the measures of the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.105)


Brotherston, Peter

Alloa and Tillibody West

An ardent and steady supporter of the Evangelical side, holding anti-patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1835, supported the veto act, the chapel act, and the anti-patronage resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. Continued to maintain his constancy until a little before the disruption, when he made the discovery from prophecy that the “Two Witnesses” of the Apocalypse were to be slain in the Establishment, and remained in, it is to be presumed, for the purpose of being slain. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.66)


Brown, Andrew

Alva

A very steady and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1842, supported the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights, Just before the Convocation, encountered a very severe accident, which laid him aside from duty for several months, and prevented him from attending; but, after his recovery in March 1843, he invited Mr Bonar, now the Free Church minister of Larbert, to address his people on the subject, and otherwise acted cordially with his party. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.66)


Brown, Andrew

Cameron

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally supported the Evangelical side, but never very decided or zealous. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.74)


Brown, John Tod

Second Charge, DunfermUne

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence and, as he forcibly and elegantly expressed it in the Assembly of 1841, was anti-patronage to “the very extreme of antagonism and antipathy.” In 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement; but by the Assembly of 1841, had begun to draw off, having, in the Assembly of that year, while he supported the anti-patronage resolutions, opposed the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. Subsequently he has uniformly and zealously opposed the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.70)


Burness, David

Wistoun

A flaming partizan of the Evangelical side, given to declaiming against the encroachments of the Civil Courts, and, beyond the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, professed anti-patronage sentiments. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.49)


Burns, Thomas

Lesmahagow

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.49)


Burnside, George Macknight

Urr

Originally somewhat prominent in his avowal of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but latterly drew considerably back in his maintenance of them. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.36)


Burt, Alexander

Arngask

Professed anti-patronage sentiments, and long a steady supporter of the measures of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. Latterly, his zeal and forwardness flagged a good deal. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.63)


Cameron, Daniel

Ayton

Translated during the present year from Bridgegate, Glasgow, on the presentation of the Crown. Up to 1842, a very decided and thorough-going assertor of Evangelical principles. Professed strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was one of the first to join the movement of the Forty, and, like a number more of the same party, speedily obtained preferment at the hands of the Government. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.29)


Cameron, Donald

Laggan

A keen and zealous partizan of the Evangelical side in all their measures, and a leader amongst them in presbytery and synod. He entertained anti-patronage principles; and, in the Assembly of 1834, he supported the veto and the chapel act. Again, in that of 1838, he voted for the independence resolutions; and, in 1840, he subscribed the solemn Engagement. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions, and continued his support of Evangelical measures down to the very last. At the time of the disruption he was placed in rather peculiar circumstances in regard to an action for augmentation of stipend, which he was pursuing against his heritors, and which, after long dependence, was almost ripe for a decision, on which large expenses hung. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.101)


Campbell, Colin Fisher

Southend

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and adhered to the first series of the Convocation resolutions. After the disruption, he addressed his congregation from the pulpit on the subject, and intimated that he would take advantage of the few days left him by the General Assembly to make up his mind as to his future course. The impression produced by this address was, that he fully intended to withdraw from the Establishment, — so much so that one of the heritors stood up and implored him, before the whole congregation, to delay his secession till after the communion. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.58)


Campbell, Duncan

Inverary

Has of more recent years generally voted with the Evangelical side, but was never reckoned a very strenuous supporter of their cause. In the Assembly of 1838, he supported the independence resolutions; in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; while, in the Assembly of 1841, he opposed the anti-patronage resolutions, and did not vote for the Claim of Rights. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.56)


Campbell, Duncan

Moulin

Generally acted with the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but was never very forward in their behalf. In 1838, took part in the ordination of Mr Kessen, and was rebuked at the bar of the Civil Court. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.61)


Campbell, James

Kildonan

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence and generally supported the Evangelical cause. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.98)


Campbell, James

Traquair

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally supported the Evangelical cause. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and in the Assembly of 1841 voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.23)


Campbell, William

Coull

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and occasionally voted in support of them in Presbyteries and Synods, but never took any decided or prominent part in the controversy. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.84)


Carr, Robert

Luss

Was accustomed to support the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1835, he voted for the veto and the chapel act, and opposed the settlement of Young, the presentee to Auchterarder; and in that of 1840, he voted against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and in favour of the suspension of the Strathbogie recusants. Latterly, as the controversy thickened, became more and more allied with Moderatism. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.50)


Chalmers, Peter

First Charge, Dunfermline

A steady supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers and the overtures on calls. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. Long wavered what course to take, but at length, some days after the disruption, applied to the Free Assembly, and was admitted into the Free Church. Thereafter preached and intimated the communion to that portion of his flock who had quitted the Establishment along with him. Attended the first diet, but not the second, of the first meeting of the Free Presbytery of Dunfermline, declining, however, when called upon, to pray. At the first meeting thereafter of the Residuary Presbytery, attended personally, and craved re-admission to his charge in the Establishment, which was graciously accorded to his supplications. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.69)


Chapman, Alexander

Milbrex, Fyvie

Professed Evangelical principles; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


Charles, John

Garvock

Has been prevented for many years from attendance on church courts, by reason of feeble health and advanced age, but was a uniform and steady supporter of the Evangelical cause. Held strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was zealous in addressing his people and getting up petitions to Parliament on the subject, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.81)


Charteris, James

Newlands

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally supported th« Evangelical cause. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.23)


Charteris, John

Dunrossness

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally supported the Evangelical cause. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.106)


Christison, John

Biggar

Originally attached himself to the Evangelical side; and in 184O subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, but speedily relapsed into Moderatism. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.23)


Chrystal, James

Auchinleck

Uniformly voted with the Evangelical party, supporting the veto and spiritual independence, but taking little of a prominent or active share in business. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Clark, Alexander

Second Charge, Inverness

Immortalized as the hero of the editor of the Witness’s able article, “The Two Mr Clarks;” a flaming professor of spiritual independence, and holding non-intrusion, merely as a step towards the optimism of the entire abolition of patronage. In the earlier stages of the controversy, preached and printed sermons, and made many platform speeches, advocating these principles in the strongest and keenest style, and for years dunned presbyteries and synods with his motions and resolutions in their behalf. In the General Assembly of 1833, he supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls, and led the discussion against patronage. In the Assemblies of 1834 and 1835, he supported the veto act and the chapel act; and, in the latter Assembly, he likewise voted in favour of the anti-patronage resolutions, and against the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In the Assembly of 1836, he again voted for the anti-patronage resolutions; and he continued the same unwavering and strenuous support of the Evangelical party and their measures down to 1841. In the Assembly of that year he first gave token of change. While he recorded his vote for the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership, and concurred in finding the relevancy of the libel against the Strathbogie recusants, he opposed the sentence of deposition, and made a motion, which he found no one to support, with the exception of the respectable and sagacious Mr Tod Brown of Dunfermline, that it should be modified to suspension sine die. From that hour he may be said to have broken loose from the Evangelical side. Shortly after his return home, he denounced at a political dinner the Evangelical leaders as men who were seeking, “in the desperation of human pride, to overthrow the Establishment;” and latterly became as zealous in using the pulpit and the press to denounce his former principles, as ever he was in supporting them. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.93)


Clark, John

Grantown, parish of Cromdale

Made a profession of Evangelical principles, and was esteemed as belonging to the majority of the Church, until, nearly two years ago, he obtained a presentation to the parish of Daviot, and shewed a disposition to force his way into it against the inclinations of the great body of the parishioner’s. Their opposition sisted his settlement until after the disruption, but it has, subsequently to that event, been got through. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.113)


Clarke, Robert

Kinlochbervie

Strenuously maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and zealously supported the Evangelical side, in all their measures, up to the very last. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.98)


Clerk, Archibald

Ardnamurchan

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally supported the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.58)


Clouston, Charles

Sandwick

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally supported the Evangelical cause. He supported the veto act in presbytery, synod, and assembly; and in the Assembly of 1839, he voted for the very strong and solemn independence resolutions of that year. Soon afterwards, began to draw off from his former friends. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.104)


Cochrane, James

Cupar

While a preacher, and Secretary to the Church Extension Committee, &c., made a very high profession of the principle of spiritual independence, but never pretended to stand so much upon non-intrusion. Since his settlement in Cupar, has acted with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.73)


Colvin, Robert

Johnstone

A very decided and active supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1834, he voted for the veto and the admission of the chapel ministers, and in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1842, he supported the rejection of the commission from the deposed Strathbogie recusants and the Claim of Rights. Did not maintain anti-patronage views, and was not a member of Convocation. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.34)


Colvin, Walter Laidlaw

Shotts

Generally acted with the Evangelical side, but was never very forward or hearty in their behalf. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. Latterly, joined the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Cooper, John

Pittenweem

A strenuous adherent of the Evangelical cause, and vehement from the pulpit and otherwise in his advocacy of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1835, he supported the veto act and the chapel act, and opposed the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. He was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.74)


Cordiner, James

Forgue

A steady and zealous adherent of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was indefatigable in advocating them throughout the country. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. Now affirms Lord Aberdeen’s bill to be everything that any reasonable man could desire. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.88)


Cosens, Peter

Lauder

A steady and active supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the Veto, and the admission of the Chapel Ministers. In 1840, signed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.31)


Craik, James

Scone

Generally acted with the Evangelical side, but cautiously. Supported the veto, and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the popular election of the eldership. Since the disruption, has been presented to St George’s, Glasgow, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.63)


Crosbie, William Glendonwyn

Parton

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.40)


Cumming, John

Fraserburgh

A steady adherent of the Evangelical side, maintaining anti-patronage views, and belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1833, he supported the chapel act and the veto; in that of 1836, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions; and, in that of 1841, for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. During the progress of the controversy he was at much pains to enlighten his people with respect to it by frequent meetings and vehement appeals, the diffusion of tracts, &c., and, as the disruption has proved, was wonderfully successful in his efforts. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions, and up to the last expressed his determination to secede. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.87)


Cunningham, James

Glendevon

Uniformly supported the Evangelical side, and concurred with the majority of his Presbytery in all their proceedings relative to the Auchterarder case. Held public meetings in his parish during the progress of the controversy. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Concurred likewise in sending up anti-patronage overtures to the General Assembly. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.65)


Curdie, James

Gigha

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. In the Assemblies of 1832 and 1833, supported the overtures on calls; and, in that of 1835, voted for the veto act, the chapel act, and against the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and continued to the last to act with his party. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.58)


Dalziel, William

St Canmore, Dunfermline

Belonged originally to the Synod of Old Light Burghers, which was united to the Establishment some years ago. Held anti-patronage principles, and thought that the Evangelical party in the Church did not by any means go far enough in maintaining these principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; but as the controversy assumed a more serious aspect, drew gradually off from the Evangelical side, until at length he ended by supporting their opponents. Since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to Thurso, from an anti-patronage patron, Sir George Sinclair. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.69)


Davidson, Alexander

Northesk

Up to about the time of his obtaining a disputed presentation to North Leith, was a uniform and cordial supporter of the Evangelical party, and made a very high profession of their principles. Was a member of the Assembly of 1840, and voted with them in every question, including the rejection of Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and in the autumn of that year subscribed the solemn Engagement. Since the disruption, has obtained undisputed possession of North Leith, one of the richest benefices in the Establishment. Was a member of Convocation, and did not adhere to either series of resolutions; but a short time before the disruption, attended a meeting of adhering ministers and elders to select the most suitable sites for Free Churches and preaching stations, and made some suggestions as to the latter. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.25)


Dewar, Daniel

Principal,Marischal College, Aberdeen

One of the most marked and prominent of all the supporters of the Evangelical cause, constantly putting himself forward as a leader in their counsels, and extending an unfaltering advocacy with tongue and pen to all their measures. Made a very high and ultra profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assemblies of 1033-4-5, supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the veto act; and, in the last-mentioned Assembly, voted against the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In the Assembly of 1838, supported the Independence resolutions; and in 1040, opposed Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and subscribed the solemn Engagement. Likewise in the same year, supported the suspension of the majority of the Presbytery of Strathbogie; and then, and after their ultimate deposition, took an active part in preaching in their parishes, in enlightening the people as to the nature of the controversy, and in stirring them up to adherence to the Church. Also took a leading and prominent share in all the public movements in Aberdeen, &c., in relation to the controversy, throughout its whole course. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership; and in that of 1842, for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights. Subscribed the circular summoning the Convocation — was present, and adhered to the first series of the resolutions, but left for his estate in the Carse of Gowrie before the vote was taken upon the second. After the disruption, made his appearance in the Free Assembly, and found his way to a prominent seat on the platform, amidst the applause of the audience, but did not subscribe the deed of demission. Thereafter, see-sawed and hesitated for months betwixt the Free Church and the Establishment, now preaching for a minister of the one, next occupying a pulpit in the other, but finally settling down as a Residuary. The following is a copy of the letter in which he communicated his resolution to that effect to the Residuary Presbytery of Aberdeen: Overdurdie, Errol,20th Sept.1843 Rev. and Dear Sir,— In reply to your letter containing an extract of a minute of the Presbytery of Aberdeen, I beg leave, through you, most respectfully to state to the Presbytery, that I have not adhered to the Protest of the seceding ministers, nor signed any document whatever similar to the Protest: That I have not withdrawn from the Established Church of Scotland,nor from attending on its worship and ordinances: And, still further,that I have not joined myself to the body of separatists acting under said Protest.— I remain. Rev. and Dear Sir, your most obedient servant,. — (Signed) D. Dewar. The Rev. William Paul Clerk of the Presbytery of Aberdeen. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.83)


Dewar, Hugh

Stonehouse

So extreme an anti-patronage man that he would not take part in any mere non-intrusion movement, and, in support of his views in this behalf, he was both zealous and prominent. In the Assembly of 1833, he supported the admission of the chapel ministers, the overtures on calls, and the anti-patronage resolutions. In that of 1842, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.47)


Dickson, Charles

Wamphray

A very decided and active partizan of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers and the overtures on calls; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.34)


Dimma, Thomas

Queensferry

A maintainer of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1833 he supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls; and again, in the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Dingwall, George

Auchterless

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1835, voted in favour of the chapel act, and the veto act. Was not a member of Convocation, but continued to extend an unwavering support in church courts to all the measures of the Evangelical side up to the disruption. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.88)


Douglas, Henry

Alexandria

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions; and since the disruption has stepped into the pulpit of the good Mr Burns of Kilsyth. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.51)


Douglas, Robert

Kilbarchan

Professed to entertain the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but never very forward or zealous in their behalf. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.44)


Drummond, Peter

Kirkmichael

A keen and violent partisan of the Evangelical side, holding anti-patronage views, and belonging to the most extreme section. Was always very fierce against Moderatism, and complained of those who received Moderate ministers into their pulpits at communion occasions. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, the admission of the chapel ministers, and the anti-patronage resolutions. In 1838, concurred with the majority of the Presbytery in proceeding with the ordination of Mr Kessen in the face of the Court of Session’s interdict. Presided at the ordination, and preached a very strong sermon on the occasion; afterwards was rebuked, with the other members of the majority, at the bar of the Court of Session. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, but adhered to neither series of the resolutions, they not being extreme enough to meet his views. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.61)


Duff, William

Grange

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and throughout the whole of the trying scenes of the controversy, of which this Presbytery was in so especial a manner the battle ground, uniformly supported the Evangelical side, and acted and voted with them in all their measures, rendered necessary by the proceedings of the civil courts, in their endeavour to coerce the Church into an abandonment of her discipline against the Moderate majority of this Presbytery. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. A few days after the disruption, was called up to the bar of the Court of Session, along with his co-presbyters the Rev. Messrs Robertson (Gartly), Dewar (Bellie), Henry (Aberchirder), and Leith (Rothiemay); and the Rev. Messrs Davidson and Simpson; with Professor Brown of Marischal College, Aberdeen, the Rev. C. J. Brown of Edinburgh, and Dr Smyttan, elder, members of the Assembly’s Special Commission, to receive sentence for having proceeded with the settlement of Mr Henry at Aberchirder or New Marnoch, in the face of an interdict. A separate statement then given in for Messrs Duff and Leith was the first intimation of their intention to remain in the Establishment. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.98)


Duncan, Alexander

Coylton

In the Assembly of 1834, voted for the veto, and held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence — the latter very strongly. Uniformly supported the Evangelical side, but became one of the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Duncan, Andrew Bethune

First Charge, Culross

A very decided and steady supporter of the Evangelical side. Held strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto act and the chapel act; in that of 1838, the independence resolutions; and in that of 1842, the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.69)


Duncan, David

Abernethy

A constant and steady supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and likewise held anti-patronage sentiments. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Afterwards voted for the suspension of the Strathbogie ministers, and attended the great West Church Meeting in August 1841. Latterly professed himself one of the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.63)


Dunn, William

Cardross

A high professor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.51)


Easton, Thomas

Kirriemuir

Long a professor of very high Evangelical and popular principles. Was a candidate for the Greek Professorship at Glasgow when the late Sir Daniel K. Sandford was elected to the chair, and obtained his Doctorship from the Faculty immediately after his defeat. Was the author of a very singular and very vehement attack upon Dr Chalmers’ astronomical discourses, when they were first rising into renown, in the shape of an anonymous pamphlet, of which the most remarkable feature is the number of pages he contrives to fill exclusively with making merry at the idea of a universe being comprised within an atom. In the Assembly of 1835, supported the veto act, the chapel act, and the anti-patronage resolutions, and opposed the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In that of 1838, supported the independence resolutions. When affairs began to wear a serious aspect, published a letter, addressed to Sir R. Robert Peel, on the proper mode of settling the Church’s difficulties; and when this failed of duly swaying the Premier’s purpose, afterwards gradually drew off into the ranks of Moderatism. Since the disruption has been a most active and inveterate Residuary. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.75)


Elder, William

St Mary’s, Cupar

Was originally of the Old Light Burgher Synod, and belonged to the most extreme section of the Evangelical side, considering Drs Candlish, Cunningham, &c., as but middlemen, who never went half far enou2h to satisfy his views. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and the solemn Engagement. Was a member of convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. Since the disruption, has obtained a Crown presentation to the parish of Tealing, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.72)


Fairlie, James

Assistant and successor, Mauchllne

A strenuous maintainer of the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and a constant supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights — was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. Before the disruption had a site for a Free Church actually selected, under his own immediate direction, and went to Edinburgh, as was understood, for the purpose of demitting. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.43)


Farries, Peter

Edinkillie

Made a flaming and ultra profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was most vehement and indefatigable in their advocacy. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on calls; in that of 1835, the veto; and in that of 1842, he voted for the Claim of Rights. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions; and after his return home, was most active in his parish in procuring adherents amongst his parishioners, and in setting into operation a sustentation association under Dr Chalmers’ scheme. Was in Edinburgh at the the time of the disruption; and a day or two after, published a curious letter in the Witness, intimating his intention to remain in the Establishment for a time at least. Thereupon, returned immediately home; but on ascertaining, it is presumed, the state of feeling in his parish, again set out for Edinburgh, but stopped short on the wav, and once more returned home. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.92)


Ferguson, James

Inch

A keen, zealous, and indefatigable partizan of the Evangelical side, and the leader of his party in the Presbytery. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, was a member of the Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. Subsequently to the disruption he permitted himself to be put forward as a candidate for St George’s, Glasgow, but, finding that he was likely to encounter formidable opposition on the ground of his former professions, he deemed it advisable to withdraw. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.38)


Ferrie, William

Kilconquhar

Originally acted with the Moderates, and only of late years shewed any leaning towards Evangelical principles; and any support he ever lent them has been fitful and uncertain. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and for the popular election of the eldership. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.73)


Fleming, David

Carriden

All along a decided advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and for the Duke of Argyle’s bill. He attended the Convocation, and subscribed the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Fleming, James

Troon

A strenuous supporter of the Evangelical side, maintaining the doctrines of spiritual independence and non-intrusion. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Fowler, James Charles

Ratho

Recently translated from St Luke’s, Glasgow. Until 1842, he uniformly supported the majority. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants — for the anti-patronage overtures — for the Duke of Argyle’s bill — and the popular election of the eldership. In 1842, he was one of the first to connect himself with the movement of the Forty; and shortly thereafter he was presented to Ratho. Since then he has, in all vital and important questions, voted against his former friends. At present believed that he is to be presented to St John’s Glasgow, vacated by the Rev. Dr Brown, a man from whom he experienced much kindness and friendship. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.20)


Fraser, John

Chapel at Stobhill, parish of Newbattle

Professed general adherence to the Evangelical cause, and maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. Subscribed the declaration adopted by the adhering probationers in December 1842, in which they declare, “that humbly beseeching Almighty God to strengthen them in the day of trial, they will maintain these principles in their own practice, and must in duty acknowledge and adhere to the ministers who maintain the same inviolate, as the office-bearers of that Church whose standards they have subscribed.” Subsequently withdrew his adherence. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.111)


Fyfe, Andrew

Dumfries

A constant supporter of the Evangelical side, and made a high profession of their principles. A member of the Convocation, and subscribed both series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.36)


Gardiner, Alexander

Lethnot

While a preacher, officiated for some time as assistant to Mr Foote of the Second Charge, Brechin, during a period of severe domestic affliction, and was then remarkable for his avowal of extreme Evangelical principles, the keenness with which he on all occasions advocated them, and his strong antipathy to Moderatism. After his settlement in Lethnot, professed to maintain his original sentiments unchanged, but almost uniformly supported the Moderates. Since the disruption, has obtained possession of the pulpit of his former employer, Mr Foote. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.80)


Gardiner, Matthew

Bothwell

All along a warm supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and took a lead in the Presbytery in support of his views. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto, and, in that of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, also took part in the great meeting in the West Kirk, Edinburgh, in August 1841, but latterly joined the Forty. Was not present at the Convocation; and on being requested, as an old moderator, to subscribe the circular summoning it, declined. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.47)


Gerard, John

South Ronaldshay

Made a very high and full profession of the principles of Evangelism, and was a keen assertor of the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. Uniformly and strenuously supported the Evangelical side in all their measures, up to the Convocation, which he did not attend; and, in May last, he voted in Synod for an overture to repeal the veto. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.103)


Gibson, Alexander

Balmaghie

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.40)


Gifford, John

Nenthorn

Originally a keen adherent of the Evangelical side, and a zealous professor of anti-patronage principles. In the Assembly of 1833, he supported the admission of the Chapel Ministers, the overtures on calls, and the anti-patronage resolutions. In that of 1838, he voted for the Independence resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. As matters grew more serious he gradually drew off; and in the Assembly of 1842, he voted against the anti-patronage resolutions, and did not support the Claim of Rights. He became one of the Fortv. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.30)


Gillan, Robert

Wishaw Town

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and acted and voted with the Evangelical side. Latterly, joined the Forty, and since the disruption has obtained the presentation to a benefice vacated by one of the seceding ministers. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Gillespie, George

Cumbertrees

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical side, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.35)


Glover, William

Greenside, Edinburgh

All along a very keen and decided adherent of the Evangelical majority, and was, it is said, the very first to raise a public testimony in behalf of their principles in the Synod of Galloway previous to his translation to Edinburgh. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1841, voted in the majority for the deposition of the seven Strathbogie recusants, and in favour of the measure of non-intrusion introduced by his Grace the Duke of Argyle. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.19)


Gordon, David W.

Earlston

Professed anti-patronage principles — a uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.31)


Graham, James

North Church, Paisley

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was a member of a non-intrusion association. In the Assembly of 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill and the solemn Engagement. In the Assembly of 1842 voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.45)


Graham, Matthew

Calton, Glasgow

Seldom attended Church Courts, or otherwise took part in their proceedings, but always reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.52)


Graham, Robert Balfour

North Berwick

A strenuous and active maintainer of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the Veto and the Chapel Act; and in that of 1838, voted for Dr Buchanan’s Independence resolutions. Volunteered his attendance with the Presbytery of Dunkeld to the bar of the Court of Session, when rebuked for breach of interdict. In 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.26)


Grant, Charles

Rothiemurchus

Made a very high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and held at one time a newspaper controversy with the minister of Alvie, in which, amongst other things, he advocated the call, instead of the veto, contending stoutly that the latter fell far short of the people’s just rights. Up to the time of the Convocation, uniformly supported the Evangelical side in all their measures. Since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to Kingussie. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.91)


Grant, James

Cromdale

Made a keen profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and in the Assembly of 1835, supported the chapel act, and opposed the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. Up to the time of the Convocation, uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side in all their measures. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.91)


Gray, Andrew

Crosshill

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and has voted in support of anti-patronage views. Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. Since the disruption has obtained the presentation to Dumbarton, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Greig, Archibald Ochiltree

Chapel at Blairgowrie

Professed adherence to the Evangelical cause, and maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Since the disruption has obtained the presentation to Blairgowrie, vacated for conscience sake by Mr Macdonald. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.112)


Greig, James

Ballingray

Throughout his long incumbency a constant and earnest supporter of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the Convocation’s resolutions, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.71)


Hall, Adam

Fisherton

Was understood to entertain anti-patronage sentiments, but careful not to commit himself in Church Courts. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.43)


Harris, David

Fearn

Throughout his incumbency a steady and active adherent of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto; and in that of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Was a member of the Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.80)


Henderson, John

Carmunnock

A forward advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and a uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1835, supported the chapel act and the veto act, and voted for the rejection of the presentee to Auchterarder; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Latterly became one of the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.53)


Honey, John Adamson

Incbture

A flaming professor of extreme popular and liberal principles. Uniformly supported the Evangelical side until the crisis was near at hand, when he began to differ with them on minute points, and to draw off from them. Was a member of Convocation, but adhered to neither series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.78)


Horne, David

Corstorphine

Did not bear any very prominent share in the proceedings of Church Courts, but was a decided and uniform supporter of the Evangelical majority, and a steady assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. He attended the Convocation, and subscribed the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.20)


Houston, Robert

Dalmellington

A zealous and active partizan of the Evangelical side, belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto and the chapel act; in that of 1836, voted for the anti-patronage resolutions; and in that of 1842, for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Hume, Edward

Pitsligo

A steady adherent of the Evangelical side, made a stout profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, like his co-presbyter, Mr Cumming, was throughout the controversy most indefatigable in stirring up his people with respect to it. In the Assembly of 1835, he supported the chapel act and the veto act; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions, and to the very last continued to support all the measures of his party. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.87)


Hunter, Colin

Portnahaven

A keen and steady supporter of the Evangelical side, belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1838, supported the independence resolutions; and in 1840,subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill; and, in that of 1842, for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. At the disruption joined the Free Church, and subscribed the deed of demission, and, after all this, coolly returned to the Establishment. Has since secured a presentation to the parish of Kilninver. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.58)


Hunter, William

Assistant and successor, St Thomas’s, Glasgow

Was generally reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side, but latterly either did not attend church courts, or withdrew before the vote. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Imray, John

Longside

A flaming professor of the principles of the Evangelical cause, holding anti-patronage views, and belonging to the extreme section. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and throughout the whole controversy was most active and zealous in inculcating his principles upon his people, both from the pulpit and the platform. Was not a member of Convocation, but continued after it to support his party in all their measures, and gave it to be understood that he was determined to withdraw with his brethren from the Establishment. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.87)


Innes, John

Fordyce

A steady and zealous adherent of the Evangelical cause. Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto and the chapel act; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1842, supported the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. So late as March 1843, gave attendance on meetings of the Provisional Committee for making preparations for the disruption, and declared his intention of retiring from the Establishment if the principles of the Convocation should not be legalized; and, by his whole arrangements previous to the Assembly, gave indication of a fixed determination to withdraw. Subsequently to the disruption, solicited and obtained the presentation to Deskford, a smaller benefice, but with a population only half as numerous as Fordyce; but again abandoned it, and remains in Fordyce. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.89)


Jackson, Donald

Chapel at Cumlodden, parish of Lochgilphead

Was for some time reckoned to belong to the Evangelical side. Last year was presented to the parliamentary church of Lochgilphead. His settlement was opposed on special objections, and the case came up to the Assembly of 1843, but in consequence of the disruption the objections were fallen from, and he has since been settled. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.111)


Jamieson, Robert

Currie

Never entertained anti-patronage principles, and voted in the minority against the anti-patronage resolutions in the Assembly of 1842. He always, however, professed himself amongst the most warm and zealous assertors of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and bore somewhat of a prominent share in their advocacy. He opposed the Earl of Aberdeen’s bill, subscribed the solemn Engagement, and in the Assembly of 1842 recorded his vote for the memorable Claim of Rights. He attended the Convocation, but adhered to first set of resolutions only. After the disruption he became a candidate for St Mary’s, Edinburgh, vacated by his personal friend, the venerable and Rev. Henry Grey, and was nominated in the Town Council of Edinburgh for the vacancy. At his nomination a laboured defence of his consistency, in the shape of a letter from himself to his proposer in the Council, was read, and a discussion followed of a character fitted to be anything but soothing to his feelings. Ultimately, he was rejected without a vote, Mr Learmonth of Dean, amongst others, declaring that, after the explanations which had taken place, he could not support him. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.19)


Jardine, Fergus

Kinghorn

Originally a very steady and forward adherent of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. Afterwards drew off, and latterly acted uniformly with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.71)


Johnston, Alexander

Moffat

Throughout a long incumbency a very zealous and decided supporter of Evangelical principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Has of late years been much weighed down by the pressure of years and infirmities. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.34)


Johnston, Thomas

Anwoth

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.40)


Johnstone, Michael Stewart

Minnigaff

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, also held anti-patronage sentiments, and was very keen and active in advancing his views. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Did not attend the Convocation, but gave it to be understood that it was not his intention to remain in the Establishment in the event of a disruption. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.39)


Johnstone, Robert

Auchtermuchty

Long a keen partizan of the Evangelical side, and a Haniing professor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and until recently a leader in his Presbytery in struggling for them. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls. Was among the earliest to begin to draw off when the controversy began to assume a serious aspect, and latterly in most essential matters opposed himself keenly to his former friends. After the disruption received a presentation to Dunblane, which he accepted, but afterwards withdrew his acceptance, on the ground that his voice was too weak for the church, &c. Immediately afterwards, was brought forward as a candidate for St Mary’s, Edinburgh, was severely dealt with in the discussion which followed in the Town Council of Edinburgh, and ultimately experienced a cutting and ignominious rejection at their hands. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.72)


Jolly, Peter

Canisbay

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and constantly supported the Evangelical side in all their measures up to the Convocation, which he did not attend. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.99)


Keith, John

Keith-hall and Kinkell

A keen partizan of the Evangelical cause, and fierce against Moderatism. Held anti-patronage sentiments, and belonged to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1835, supported the veto act and the chapel act and, in that of 1838, voted for the Independence resolutions. Uniformly and zealously supported his party in all their measures up to the Convocation. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.86)


Keith, Peter Hay

Hamilton

Generally acted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Was rather favourable from the first to a repeal of the veto, and latterly joined the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Kelly, Daniel

2d Charge, Campbelton

From the outset uniformly and steadily supported the Evangelical side. Voted with the late Dr Andrew Thomson, of St George’s, Edinburgh, on the orders in Council regarding prayers for Queen Caroline. In the Assemblies of 1833 and 1834, supported the veto and the chapel acts. Was, in 1836, suspended sine die. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.57)


Ker, John

Polmont

A maintainer of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence from the outset. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on calls; and in 1840, he opposed Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and voted for the suspension of the Strathbogie recusants. He never bore any very prominent share in the controversy. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Kirkwood, Robert

Holywood

Maintained the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was throughout, up to the very last, a zealous and active partizan of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on calls and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. He was a member of Convocation, and subscribed both series of the resolutions; and, when the Moderate majority in the Presbytery resolved, after the Stewarton decision, to eject the quoad sacra brethren from their seats, he was one of the minority who withdrew to form a separate Presbytery, in which he moderated. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.36)


Lang, Gavin

Glassford

Customarily acted and voted with the Evangelical side, but not remarkable for his zeal in their behalf. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls; and, in that of 1838, the independence resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Lawrie, John

Row

In the Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, and the admission of the chapel ministers; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted with the evangelical side. Some months before the Convocation, began to draw off. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.50)


Learmonth, William

West Calder

A keen and zealous advocate and propagator of the principles of the Evangelical majority. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, he supported the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. He was present at the Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.22)


Leishman, Matthew

Govan

From the commencement of his incumbency a keen and forward adherent of the Evangelical side — maintaining strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and originally holding anti-patronage sentiments also, having voted for the anti-patronage resolutions in the Assembly of 1833. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and, in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Latterly the acknowledged leader, the very “head and front” of the movement of the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.53)


Leith, Harry

Rothiemay

Is to to be placed in all respects in the same category as Mr [William] Duff[, Grange]. Like him he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and both series of the Convocation resolutions; participated in all the measures of the Evangelical side, and ultimately united with him in the separate statement before referred to. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.98)


Lochore, Alexander

Drymen

In the Assembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls; and in that of 1836, voted for the anti-patronage resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and uniformly and zealously acted with the Evangelical side down to the period of the Convocation, when he began to draw off. After the Civil Court’s decision in the Stewarton case, voted with the Moderates for the exclusion of the quoad sacra brethren from their seats in the Presbytery. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.50)


Logan, David

Stenton

From the first a steady adherent of the Evangelical party. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1842, he voted for the rejection of the commission from the deposed Strathbogie recusants, for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of the Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.26)


Logie, William

First Charge, Kirkwall

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and gave a general support to the measures of the Evangelical side, up to the Convocation, which he did not attend. In 1836, he voted in Presbytery for an overture, calling upon the Assembly to adopt the full call; and, like his co-presbyter, Mr Gerard, voted in Synod in May last for the repeal of the veto. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.103)


Loudon, George

Inverarity

Long a decided and steady supporter of Evangelical principles. Never held anti-patronage sentiments, but made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was active in their advocacy. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto; and in that of 1838, the independence resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, supported the Claim of Rights. After the Convocation, strongly opposed his former friends. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.76)


Macbean, Hugh

Ardclach

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally voted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.94)


Maccallum, Duncan

Rasay and Rona, Portree

Previous to the disruption professed Evangelical principles, and was always reckoned as belonging to the majority of the Church. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


Macdonald, John

Rannoch

A keen and uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was forward in their advocacy. Last year moved, in Presbytery, the rejection of the presentee to Glenlyon under the veto act. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.62)


Macdougall, John

Lochgoilhead and Kilmorich

A constant and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side — maintaining the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions; and, in that of 1842, for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.57)


Macfarlane, James

Duddingston

It may be doubted whether he ought not rather to have been placed in Class First of the Residuary Presbytery, as he has for years uniformly acted and voted with them in all questions of ecclesiastical polity. He was, however, at one time, while in St Bernard’s Church, Edinburgh, a supporter of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and accustomed to speak strongly in their behalf. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.20)


Macfarlane, James

Muiravonside

A keen supporter of the principles of the Evangelical majority. In 1840 he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill and the solemn Engagement. In the Assembly of 1842, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. He adhered to both series of the Convocation resolutions; but afterwards, by letter, formally withdrew his adherence. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.22)


Macfarlane, Patrick John

Dron

A professed friend of the Evangelical cause and of the spiritual independence of the Church, but never took a prominent part in public matters, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.64)


Macintosh, W.

Missionary of Christian Knowledge Society; station, Flota, parish of Walls and Flota

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and professed adherence to the Evangelical cause. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.111)


Mackellar, Donald

Mearns

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Maintained the doctrines otf spiritual independence and non-intrusion, and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.45)


Mackenzie, John

Gaelic Church, Cromarty

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally acted and voted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.96)


Mackenzie, Kenneth

Borrowstounness

A very ardent professor of the principles of the Evangelical majority, and belonging to the extreme section. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and in the Assembly of 1841 he voted in the minority on Dr Cunningham’s motion declaring patronage to be a grievance and an evil which ought to be abolished, likewise for the deposition of the Strathbogie seven, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. He attended the Convocation, and subscribed both series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Mackenzie, Mungo Campbell

Lasswade

Throughout the whole of the Church’s contendings he maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1833, he supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 1838, he voted for Dr Buchanan’s Independence resolutions. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. He was a member of Convocation, but did not subscribe either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.24)


Macmorland, Peter

St Matthews, Glasgow

A strenuous adherent of the extreme section of the Evangelical side — holding the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and maintaining anti-patronage views. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and the solemn Engagement; and in the Assembly of 1842 supported the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Latterly joined the Forty. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the Resolutions; nevertheless, up to the disruption, and even after it, gave various indications of joining the Free Church. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Macnair, Robert

Abbey, Paisley

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, in the earlier stages of the controversy, lectured in several parishes on the subject. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Latterly has acted zealously and uniformly with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.44)


Martin, Angus

Duirnish

A very keen partizan of the Evangelical cause, and a strenuous assertor of anti-patronage principles. So decided a non-intrusionist that, when in the course of his settlement, the Moderate majority of the Presbytery shewed a disposition to set aside the veto regulations, after consulting with the Procurator of the Church, he gave in a paper expressive of his adherence to that law, and of his wish to be settled according to its provisions. He was not present at the Convocation, but sent a letter of apology, and about two months after it gave in his adherence to the first series of resolutions. Now a very strong opponent of his old friends; and in preaching the church of Bracadale vacant, selected for his text, 1 John, 2d chap. 19th verse, “They went out from us, but they were not of us,” &c., — certainly a great and palpable truth, even in its accommodation. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.101)


McArthur, John

Kilcalmonell

Held strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was very forward and energetic in their advocacy, as leader of his presbytery on the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto act and the chapel act; in that of 1838, the independence resolutions; and, in that of 1841, the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Since the disruption has become minister of North Bute, a quoad sacra parish, erected by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.57)


McCalman, Hugh

Seamen’s Chaplain,

A keen and vehement partizan of the Evangelical side, speaking frequently and violently at non-intrusion meetings. “Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. At the disruption joined the Free Church, adhered to the protest, preached repeatedly at various places in her service, and was on terms for a fixed station in her borders. The one week unhesitatingly and cheerfully subscribed the deed of demission, and the next sent a letter to the moderator of the Free Presbytery, requesting him to withdraw his name, and another to the Residuary Presbytery, entreating to be received back into the Establishment. Has since been presented to the benefice of one of the seceding ministers. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.111)


McCulloch, Colin

Hags, Denny

A very high and ardent professor of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and a thorough-going supporter of the Evangelical side up to the era of the Convocation. Since the disruption has obtained the presentation to Denny, vacated by that venerable and faithful man of God, Mr Dempster. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.66)


McCulloch, James Melville

Kelso

Originally a keen partizan of the extreme section of the Evangelical side, and during the first years of the controversy bore a prominent share in its public agitation, presiding at or otherwise taking part in non-intrusion meetings, &c. In the Assembly of 1833, he supported the admission of the Chapel Ministers and the overtures on calls. In that of 1836, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Afterwards he took a leading and active share in originating and carrying forward the unhappy movement of the Forty. Subsequently to the disruption he was proposed in the Edinburgh Town Council for St Mary’s, Edinburgh, but his election was strongly opposed by a large section of the Council, and he was most unpleasantly handled in the course of the discussion which followed. Ultimately he was elected by a small majority, but declined the presentation. Has now obtained and accepted the presentation to the West Church, Greenock, the richest benefice in the Establishment. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.30)


McDonald, Donald

Benbecula, parish of South Uist

Previous to the disruption he made a profession of Evangelical principles. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


McEwen, John

Milton

Held anti-patronage sentiments, and steadily voted with the Evangelical side until the last. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.71)


McFie, Daniel

Harris

Maintained Evangelical principles; and, shortly after the disruption, made application to the Free Presbytery of Skye to be received as a minister of the Free Church, consideration of which was delayed till their next meeting. This application he has not farther prosecuted before the Presbytery. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


McGregor, Alexander Murray

Balquhidder

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.67)


McIntosh, Duncan

Amulrie, parish of Rannoch

Previous to the disruption, made a profession of Evangelical principles. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


McIntosh, Simon

Third Charge, Inverness

One of the vetoed presentees to Daviot. Previous to his obtaining the presentation to Daviot, used to be reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side, and to profess non-intrusion principles. After his settlement at Inverness, maintained a strict neutrality until the approach of the disruption, which perfectly removed all the indecision under which he had previously laboured. Since then, has obtained the presentation to one of the Aberdeen city charges. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.94)


McKenzie, George

Skene

Professed the principles of non-intrusioa and spiritual independence, but not very strongly, and never lent more than a timid and hesitating support to the measures of the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Latterly eschewed any share in ecclesiastical movements. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.84)


McLachlan, Donald

North Knapdale

Formerly, when in Caithness-shire, a high professor of Evangelical principles, and uniformly and strenuously supported the party. After his entry upon his present charge, subscribed a non-intrusion petition, and made other movements in the same cause. Latterly has lapsed into Moderatism. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.56)


McLaren, John

Grandtully, parish of Dull

Previous to the disruption made a profession of Evangelical principles. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


Mclver, Farquhar

Glensheil

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.100)


McPherson, Charles

Tomintoul

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence inclining to anti-patronage views. In the Assembly of 1834, he supported the veto and the chapel acts; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Up to the time of the Convocation, he was a most zealous, active, and determined supporter of the Evangelical side in all their measures. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.91)


McPherson, Lewis

Inch

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.91)


Menzies, William

Keir

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1840, he voted against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and in favour of the suspension of the Strathbogie recusants. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.37)


Menzies, William

Lanark

Was settled under the auspices, and introduced to his people by the late venerable and Rev. Sir Henry Moncrieff, of the West Kirk Edinburgh, and throughout his prolonged incumbency has steadily and warmly supported the Evangelical side. Did not hold anti-patronage sentiments, but maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, in the Assembly of 1833, supported the veto. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.49)


Middleton, William

Culsalmond

Was intruded by the majority of the Presbytery as assistant and successor at Culsalmond, but his settlement was reversed by the General Assembly of 1842. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.86)


Mitchell, Gordon

Kilmadock

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.67)


Mitchell, Graham

Whitburn

A decided advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence from the first, and active in maintaining them. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on calls; and in 1840, he voted against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. He attended the Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Mitchell, Robert

Carrington

Uniformly and zealously maintained and advocated the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. Since the disruption he has obtained and accepted the presentation to the parish of Craig, in the Presbytery of Brechin, vacated by the excellent and venerable Dr Brewster. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.24)


Mitchell, William

Chapel at Persie, parish of Bendochy

Professed adherence to the Evangelical cause, and after the disruption declared his determination to join the Free Church, but did not act upon his resolution to that effect. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.112)


Moncrieff, William Scott

Pennicuik

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical party down to a period subsequent by some years to the enactment of the Veto, and made a strong profession of their principles, but has, during a few recent years, as uniformly opposed them. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.24)


Monilaws, George Hope

Tulliallan

A keen and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side in all their measures, belonging to the extreme section, professing anti-patronage principles, and the leader of his Presbytery. In the Assembly of 1842, voted for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. In April 1843, was elected by the Evangelical majority moderator of the Synod of Perth and Stirling, and in this capacity was served with an interdict from the civil courts forbidding the Synod to proceed to business so long as the quoad sacra members were allowed to retain their seats. He immediately dissolved the Synod and quitted the chair, as being under civil coercion, which impeded all conscientious deliberation. Gave repeated public indications of an intention to join the Free Church, but as often drew back, and has latterly become one of the most active and useful of the Residuaries. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.67)


Montgomery, Thomas

Sanquhar

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, in the Assembly of 1838, voted for the Independence resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration agaiust Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.37)


Morison, James

Kintail

Made a very high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Extended an unwavering support to all the measures of the Evangelical side until the period of the Convocation. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.100)


Morison, Walter

Morebattle

A very decided advocate of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical party, and supported them in all their measures, so long as they remained in the Establishment, refusing to join in the movement of the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.29)


Morren, Nathaniel

North Kirk, Greenock

Professed anti-patronage principles, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. When the controversy began perceptibly to wax towards a crisis, became less forward in their support, and latterly assailed his former friends from the pulpit, with some smartness and much bitterness, in a series of discourses, afterwards published under the title of “My Church Politics, or Letters to my People,” &c. In one of these letters he nevertheless declares it to be his determination to quit the Establishment, if the decisions of the Civil Courts should be submitted to by the Church. A fitting commentary on this declaration is his presentation by the Crown, since the disruption, to the first charge of Brechin. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.46)


Muir, John

Kirkmabreck

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was very active and zealous in promoting them. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.39)


Muir, John

St James’, Glasgow

Throughout his long incumbency a high professor of Evangelism, uniformly acting and voting with his party. Maintained strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, though of late years but seldom attending the meetings of Presbytery, repeatedly voted in support of them. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but adhered to neither series of the resolutions. Entertains a theory respecting the Popish relief bill of 1829, which serves him on many occasions as an effectual refuge upon points of difficulty in ecclesiastical principle and polity; and, as this must be a matter of considerable interest to many in times like the present, it may not be without its use to present his own account of it, as given in a letter to a brother presbyter, dated in February 1842, in reply to a request that he would signify his concurrence in a certain overture to the Assembly. “My reply,” says the Doctor, “is that I heartily concur in that part of the overture that condemns the intrusion of ministers upon reclaiming congregations; but, holding as I do that the favour of God was necessarily withdrawn from us when, in the year 1829, the nation as a nation ceased to protest publicly, in the face of the world, for Christ and against Antichrist, by passing what is commonly called the Popish Emancipation Act, and against which deed our National Church, as such, never protested, I cannot concur in that part of the overture which seeks, in present circumstances, the abolition of patronage. Any innovation upon the constitution, as it stood prior to that period, must now be turned into a curse, instead of proving a blessing; and the immediate abolition of patronage would, in my opinion, be the removal ot the last prop that yet, under God, upholds the Establishment of the true Protestant reformed religion in Scotland. “You are at liberty to make what use you please of this letter “, (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.52)


Murdoch, John

Clerkston

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side, and professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. Supported the independence resolutions in the Assembly of 1838, and in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Since the disruption, has obtained the presentation to the Middle Church, Perth, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Murray, David

Dysart

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and held anti-patronage views. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.71)


Myles, Thomas

Chapel at Auchmithie, parish of St Vigeans

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and generally professed adherence to the Evangelical cause. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.111)


Napier, Peter

St George’s in the Fields, Glasgow

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and supported the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Latterly but rarely attended Church Courts, and joined the Forty. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.53)


Nicoll, Walter

Norriston

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.67)


Nivison, Alexander

Roberton

Originally supported the Evangelical side, and in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, but speedily relapsed into Moderatism. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.32)


Nivison, William B.

Kirtle

Originally acted with the Evangelical side, and maintained their principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, but speedily relapsed into Moderatism. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.35)


Noble, James

St Madoes

A warm, zealous, and decided advocate of the Evangelical cause, and a sufferer by interdicts and otherwise at the hands of his heritors, in consequence of his activity in promoting non-intrusion meetings, &c, In the Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, and the admission of the chapel ministers; and in that of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill and the solemn Engagement. Attended the great West Church Meeting in August 1841; and in the Assembly of 1842, supported the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. Was present at the meeting of members of Convocation preliminary to the Assembly of 1843, when the disruption was finally resolved on. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.63)


Paisley, Robert

Partick

A constant supporter of the Evangelical side, belonging to the extreme section. Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was a keen advocate of anti-patronage views. Was a member of Convocation, but entirely disapproved of the resolutions as not, in his view, occupying sufficiently extreme grounds. Since the disruption, has obtained the presentation to St Ninian’s, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Paterson, William

Whiteness, parish of Tingwall

Previous to the disruption; he professed Evangelical principles, and approved of the Assembly’s resolution against patronage. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


Paton, Robert

Straiton

A strong assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and a leader in his presbytery on the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and, in that of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Paul, John

St Cuthbert’s, Edinburgh

Long the colleague in the ministry of the late eminent and godly Dr Dickson, and, like that good man, uniformly and earnestly maintained the cause of Evangelism. He did not profess anti-patronage principles, but he opposed Lord Aberdeen’s bill, subscribed the declaration against it, and steadily maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. He was present at the Convocation, but did not adhere to either of the series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.19)


Phin, Kenneth Macleay

Galashiels

Previous to obtaining a Crown presentation to Galashiels was one of the most active and vehement advocates of the principles of the Evangelical side, and is reported to have entertained extreme anti-patronage views; but since his settlement in that parish he has usually acted and voted with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.32)


Pitcairn, David

Evie and Rendall

Made a very full profession of the principles of Evangelism, and was most earnest and ultra in his assertion of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1836, he moved in the Presbytery the overture in favour of the call above mentioned, and was constant in his approval and support of all the measures of the Evangelical party. For some years back he has been resident in England, on account of bad health, and did not adhere to the resolutions of Convocation. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.104)


Proudfoot, Peter

Arroquhar

A steady, unwavering partizan of the Evangelical side, professing anti-patronage principles, and belonging to the extreme section. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Did not adhere to the Convocation resolutions; but, at the disruption, withdrew with the Free Churchmen from the Establishment, and subscribed the deed of demission. Thereafter repented of the step he had taken, and sought and obtained re-admission to the Establishment — a proceeding in which he has only the example of another two or three to keep him in countenance. It is but just to say that he had previously been in very broken health. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.50)


Proudfoot, William

Avondale

Professed at one time to be very strong on non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was bustling and forward in their advocacy. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Latterly, joined the Forty, and seemed, if appearances may be judged from, the only man amongst them thoroughly persuaded that in doing so he had done something to be proud of. In the Residuary Assembly of 1843, was most amusingly vivacious on their having “fortified the Church,” but was cruelly cut short by his more discreet brethren. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.47)


Ralph, Hugh

Aberdour

A recent importation from Liverpool. Assumed a very high spiritual and evangelistic tone in the Presbytery, enlarging much upon prayer, &c,; and while voting on every question with the Moderates, professed to entertain, after a fashion, the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. On the occasion of electing presbyterial representatives for the Assembly of 1842, maintained that no man could pray who did not adhere to the usual rotation system; and on the similar occasion in 1843, voted that it should be departed from. The immense body of his parishioners are zealous Free Churchmen, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.70)


Ranken, James

Maxwellton

A keen partizan of the Evangelical majority, making a strong profession of their principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions, but afterwards formally withdrew his subscription by letter. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.36)


Reid, James Seaton

Professor of Church History

A minister of the Synod of Ulster, and making a full profession of all the principles maintained by that highly Evangelical body. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Reid, John

Brownfield, Glasgow

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Latterly joined the Forty; and since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to the benefice of one of the seceding ministers. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Reid, John

Johnstone

Came into the Establishment along with the Old Light Burgher Synod, whom he had joined shortly before. Was a keen opponent of patronage, and a general, though not a very consistent or uniform, supporter of the Evangelical side. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.45)


Reid, William

Kettle

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly and zealously supported the Evangelical side, up to his settlement in Kettle; but since then has acted with the Moderates. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.72)


Riddel, Henry

Longformacus

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in 1840 voted in the majority for the suspension of the Strathbogie ministers. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.28)


Ritchie, William

Athelstaneford

Throughout the whole controversy, an ardent and zealous partizan of the Evangelical majority. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was accustomed to speak against patronage, contending that patrons had no right to compensation because they had received both the price and the purchase. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.25)


Ritchie, William

St Martin’s

Maintained anti-patronage sentiments, and was chosen by the people in 1838 to be minister of the parish as an avowed supporter of popular principles. Since the disruption, has been preferred to the parish of Longforgan, vacated by Mr Walker, whose principles throughout the controversy were never so extreme as his own. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.64)


Robertson, James

Yell

A keen assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls and the admission of the chapel ministers, and in that of 1835, voted for the veto and the chapel act. He uniformly supported the Evangelical side in all their measures. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.106)


Robertson, James H.

Coldinghame

Professed the principles of spiritual independence and non-intrusion, but never very active or forward in maintaining them. Generally supported the Evangelical side when he took part in the business of Church Courts, which was seldom. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.29)


Robertson, John

Houndwood

For a time a cautious and hesitating assertor of the principles of Evangelism — latterly a confirmed Moderate. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.29)


Robertson, William

Logie

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1835, voted for the veto act, and the chapel act. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.67)


Rose, Lewis

Duke Street, Glasgow

Before the Evangelical side attained the ascendancy in the Church, used to be their zealous and constant supporter in the General Assembly and the inferior Church Courts, but since his translation to Glasgow, and their becoming a majority, has passed into the ranks of their opponents, and uniformly voted with the Moderates. About two years ago published a pamphlet, bitterly assailing his former party, which may be characterized as about the worst tempered and silliest which has made its appearance on either side throughout the whole controversy. Since the disruption, has obtained the presentation to the parish of Kincardine, Ross-shire, vacated by a seceding minister, to which he was lately inducted, along with the presentees to two other parishes in the Presbytery of Tain, in one forenoon, in the good old Moderate style, at Dingwall, many miles from the parishes, the Presbytery being alarmed to trust themselves near the locality of the indignant parishioners. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.53)


Runciman, David

Newington, Edinburgh

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical party, and supported them in their measures. He voted for the original Independence resolutions brought forward by Dr Buchanan of Glasgow in the Assembly of 1838, was present at the Convocation, and subscribed both series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.19)


Russell, John

Dalserf

In the Assembly of 1834, voted for the veto and the admission of the chapel ministers, and generally both before and since acted with the Evangelical party. Has latterly been in a very feeble state of health. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.47)


Russell, Robert

Yarrow

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in the Assembly of 1832 supported the overtures on calls. Throughout a long incumbency steadily acted with the Evangelical party, though not taking any active or prominent share in the more recent struggles. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.32)


Rutherford, James

Channelkirk

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. A general but cautious supporter of the Evangelical side, taking by no means a prominent share in the controversy. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.31)


Scott, James

Dalmeny

A very zealous professor of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and an attender of anti-patronage meetings, though generally voting against anti-patronage overtures in Church Courts. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on calls; and in 1840, he opposed Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and voted for the suspension of the Strathbogie recusants. He was likewise present at the Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Sibbald, James Hope

Cranshaws

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical party — was a member of Convocation, and subscribed both series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.28)


Simpson, Alexander L.

Kirknewton

Acquired considerable notoriety for the share he took in originating and heading the movement of the “Forty” in 1842, to which so much of the subsequent disasters of the Church may be traced. Originally acted with the Moderate party, but became the strenuous adherent of the Evangelical side from about the era of their rising into a majority. He warmly advocated the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in the earlier stages of the controversy took a considerable share in arousing the attention of the people to a sense of their importance. In 1840, he strongly opposed Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and in the Assembly of that year spoke and voted against it, and continued, up to a late period, a member of the General Assembly’s Non-intrusion Committee. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.18)


Sloan, Nicholas

Dornock

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally acted with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.98)


Smellie, George

Assistant and successor, Lady

Made a full and earnest profession of Evangelical principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and down to the very last he continued an unwavering support to the measures of the majority. It was generally understood that he had resolved to connect himself with the Free Church; but, although at the time of the disruption in Edinburgh, he did not formally do so. He was then, however, just on the eve of sailing for an appointment in Canada, and it is possible that, in his peculiar circumstances, the omission may have been one merely of inadvertence. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.105)


Smellie, James

Crosshill

Held very decidedly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence.. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.43)


Smith, Colin

Inverary

A constant and uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and held repeated public meetings in their behalf. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto; in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.56)


Smith, George

Birse

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. In the Assembly of 1835, voted for the veto act and the chapel act, and against the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. As the controversy thickened, and its aspects grew serious, gradually drew off from his former friends. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.84)


Smith, James

Ettrick

Professed to belong to the Evangelical party, and supported the Veto. Has for several years back been gradually drawing off from them. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.32)


Smith, James

Borthwick

Formerly of the Relief Synod, afterwards of Chalmers’ Church, Glasgow. Up to the Assembly of 1841, he uniformly acted with the Evangelical majority, and made a high profession of their principles, but, since his presentation to Borthwick, has voted as a confirmed Moderate. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.25)


Smith, John

Ecclesmachen

A steady supporter of the Evangelical side, and held very decidedly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but did not take any prominent share in their advocacy. In the Assembly of 1840, he voted on all questions with the majority. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.22)


Smith, Robert

Old Machar

Long an active and zealous partizan of the Evangelical cause, belonging to the extreme section. Was one of the warmest opponents of patronage, at a time when there were but few of his sentiments in the Church; and some years after his ordination, brought into the Assembly an overture from the Presbytery of Irvine against it. Made a strong profession of the principles of non-iutrusion and spiritual independence, and was a strenuous advocate of the veto and the chapel acts. As the controversy thickened, gradually drew off, and became estranged from his former friends; and after the decision of the Stewarton case, in spring 1843, voted with the Moderates in presbytery and synod for the ejection of the quoad sacra brethren from their seats. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.83)


Somerville, Robert

Chapel at Bargrennan, parish of Minnigaff

Was generally considered to belong to the Evangelical side, and to maintain their principles. On one occasion he gave an honourable and practical proof of his attachment to the principle of non-intrusion, for having obtained a presentation to be assistant and successor to the incumbent of the parish of Kirkcowan, he was vetoed by the people, and submitted himself to the law of the Church. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.112)


Steven, Charles Bannatyne

Stewarton

Held anti-patronage sentiments, and altogether may be placed very much in the same category as Dr [John] Wilson.[Irvine]. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.44)


Stevenson, Robert

East Parish, Airdrie

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and has supported with his vote anti-patronage resolutions. Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill and the solemn Engagement. Since the disruption has obtained the presentation to Forfar, vacated by a seceding minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.48)


Stevenson, Robert

Middle Church, Paisley

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was a member of a non-intrusion association. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and, in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.45)


Stevenson, William

Arbroath

Always belonged to the Evangelical side, and made a high profession of their principles. Entertained the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; but, in the earlier stages of the controversy, was laid aside from his parish and the duties of the ministry by protracted indisposition. Was restored when affairs had assumed a serious aspect, and cautiously kept aloof from taking a side with either party, expressing his satisfaction that he could, from a loop-hole, as it were, look forth upon the strife without being personally involved in it, just as if he lay under no responsibility to God in the matter. Was not a member of Convocation; but, most unexpectedly to all parties, a short time after the sittings had terminated, called a meeting of his congregation, and addressed them at considerable length on the state of the Church, giving them to understand that, should the disruption which appeared to be impending take place, and the Evangelical party quit the Establishment, he could not remain behind them in alliance with Moderatism, but expressing at the same time his fears whether the delicate state of his health would permit him to undertake the labour of forming a new congregation in connection with the Free Church, and suggesting his probable retirement into private life, After the disruption, addressed a letter to his people expressive of his high satisfaction with the Government bill. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.79)


Stevenson, William

Northmavine

Was a keen assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the measures of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1834 he recorded his vote for the veto. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.107)


Stewart, Harry

Oathlaw

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and generally acted with the Evangelical side, but not very decided, and his support at all times of a wavering, eccentric description, never to be reckoned upon. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.76)


Stewart, James

Abernethy

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.91)


Stewart, John

Sorn

In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto and the chapel act, and was throughout the whole controversy a loud and vehement assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and strenuous in his efforts to promote them. Before the disruption became a strong advocate for the repeal of the veto, and after it obtained a presentation to the wealthy parish of Liberton, in the Presbytery of Edinburgh, vacated, for conscience sake, by the Rev. James Begg. It was the first Crown presentation laid on any Presbytery table after the disruption. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Stobie, Robert

Eday, parish of Stronway

Previous to the disruption, he professed Evangelical principles, and was always reckoned as belonging to the majority of the Church. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.114)


Strachan, James Yeaman

St James’, Forfar

An ultra-professor of ultra-liberal politics, and at one time a delegate to some anti-corn law or Chartist or other kindred convention, held in England. Professed to be opposed to patronage, and to be friendly to the other principles held by the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.76)


Strong, David

Low Church, Kilmarnock

In the Assembly of 1834, voted for the veto and the admission of the chapel ministers; but, when the controversy began to run high, grew cautious in his support of the Evangelical side, and, though he often seemed to favour them in his speeches in the Presbytery, his vote was generally against them. Since the disruption has obtained a presentation to the parish of Dailly, vacated by a faithful minister. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.44)


Struthers, John

Rhynd

Signed the “memorial” addressed by the divinity students of Edinburgh to the General Assembly in 1840, expressing admiration and gratitude to Almighty God for the resolute stand made by the Church against the aggressions of the secular power, and vindicating the principle of non-intrusion. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.64)


Sutherland, David

Strathy

Entertained anti-patronage sentiments, and generally made a very high and full profession of the principles of the Evangelical side, and extended an unwavering support to all their measures, up to the very last. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions, and subsequently was very active and successful in procuring adherences amongst his parishioners. A short time before the disruption, intimated publicly to his congregation his intention of adhering to the Establishment, and, under cover of the Stewarton decision, renounced his attendance on church courts. After all, makes a strenuous disavowal of Moderatism, while he acts cordially with the party in all things, not excepting their proceedings against his more faithful and self-sacrificing brethren. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.99)


Symington, James

Muirkirk

A uniform and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1833 recorded his vote for the overtures on calls and the admission of the chapel ministers; in that of 1838, for the independence resolutions; and in that of 1842, for the Claim of Rights. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.42)


Tait, Adam Duncan

Kirkliston

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was especially strong upon the latter. In 1839, he supported Dr Chalmers’ resolutions, solemnly pledging the Church to maintain the principle of non-intrusion at all hazards, notwithstanding the Auchterarder decision. He has long ceased to act with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.21)


Tannoch, John

Kinross

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Uniformly supported the Evangelical side, until his translation to Kinross; since which, he has acted with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.70)


Thom, Alexander

Nigg

Maintained strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and in the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions. Was a faithful and steady adherent of the Evangelical cause, but was latterly in a very feeble state of health. At the time of the disruption, was on his death-bed, and only survived it a few weeks. Had he been spared, there is little doubt that he would have joined the Free Church. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.84)


Thomson, James

St Clement’s, Dundee

Throughout his long incumbency a steady active partizan of the Evangelical cause, belonging to the extreme section, and for very many years the leader of his party in the Presbytery. Throughout the recent controversy maintained a high and flaming profession of the great principles at issue, and by his votes and speeches in church courts, and his frequent appearances at public meetings, took a prominent share in their advocacy. In the Assemblies of 1833-4-5, he supported the veto act, and the chapel act, and in the latter year he likewise voted against the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In the Assembly of 1836, he supported the anti-patronage resolutions; and, in 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement. In the Assembly of 1841, he supported the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill; and, in that of 1842, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. Some months afterwards, suspicions began to be entertained respecting his adherence to his pledges, and in consequence almost his entire Session resigned, as he failed to satisfy them on the point. Thereafter, and so late as 1st April last, he published a letter in the Dundee Warder, in which, referring to the report that he had withdrawn his concurrence to the proceedings of Convocation, he felt it “proper to give it a direct negative,” and declared that “he had not even in thought swerved from it to this moment.” Since the disruption, he has been about the most active of all the Residuaries. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.77)


Thomson, Robert Burns

Spott

Always professed to maintain the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical party up to the Convocation, which he did not attend. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.26)


Traill, David

Panbride

Became a decided supporter of the Evangelical cause about the time of the famous Marnoch intrusion, and in consequence of that intrusion adopted anti-patronage sentiments. Thereafter, presided at an anti-patronage meeting in his parish, and was present at various public meetings in Dundee in behalf of the same cause. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.78)


Tulloch, Weir

Tibbermore

An editor of the Perthshire Advertiser during the ferment of the Reform Bill. A vehement advocate of popular principles. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. Took part in a great non-intrusion meeting held at Perth in October 1841, presided over by the Marquis of Breadalbane, and moved the third resolution, that if the principles against which the Church was contending were established, they would “be subversive of the government appointed by the Lord Jesus in his Church,” &c.; and that “the administration of the affairs of the Church, on such a footing, could not be conducted or submitted to by the office-bearers holding the principles set forth in the preceding resolution.” This resolution he supported in a very strong speech, in which he declared, amongst other things, “that the Church had not submitted, and, without being guilty of a great sin, never could submit, to the encroachments of the civil courts;” that “exclusive jurisdiction in things spiritual is a privilege which the office-bearers are bound to defend at all hazards and in defiance of all difficulties;” and, amid great applause, called upon all true sons of the Church to rally round her, “if they would not see the blightening influence of Moderatism and violent settlements again over- spreading the land— if they would not transmit as a legacy to their children a church which might insult their holiest feelings and disregard their best interests, and when again, as formerly, they might be fed with husks of Christianized heathenism, instead of the pure bread of life — if, in a word, they would not prove base traitors to the King of kings and the Lord of lords.” &c. Likewise presided at a meeting in his own parish in February last, for explaining the principles and forwarding the object of the Convocation. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.63)


Tulloch, William

Dallas

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Generally voted in church courts with the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.92)


Turnbull, John

Tingwall

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and throughout his long incumbency uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. Latterly, like many others, inclined to anti-patronage views. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.106)


Turner, Alexander

Gorbals

Originally an editor of the Presbyterian Review, the great Evangelical organ. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in the outset professed anti-patronage views. In the Assembly of 1835, supported the chapel act and the veto act, and voted against the settlement of the Auchterarder presentee. Was amongst the earliest to draw off and become estranged from his former friends. In 1840, declared in favour of Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Has recently been presented to the parish of Port of Menteith. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Underwood, John

Greenhead

Was reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side; but becoming a member of Presbytery when matters were hurrying to a crisis, either did not attend church courts, or at least usually avoided the vote. Since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to Kirkcudbright. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.54)


Veitch, James

St Cuthbert’s, Edinburgh

At one time supported the Veto, and professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; but of late years he took but little share in the business of Church Courts, and generally, when he did so, acted with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.20)


Waddel, David

Stow

A keen adherent of the Evangelical party, holding the principles of the extreme section, and extending an unflinching support to all their measures. In the Assembly of 1842, supported the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights, was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.31)


Walker, James

Muthil

A loud and flaming professor of Evangelical principles, holding anti-patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extremest section. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 1835, the chapel act and the veto act. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and the solemn Engagement. Not only concurred in all the proceedings of his Presbytery during the dependence of the Auchterarder case, but invariably attempted to lead on the subject, and constantly urged the most decided measures. Frequently held meetings in his own parish during the progress of the controversy, and assisted at many others in different parts of the country. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. Turned round shortly before the disruption, and opposed his former friends in the Presbytery. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.65)


Walker, John H.

Legerwood

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and steadily supported the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the Independence resolutions; and in that of 1841, for the anti-patronage resolutions, the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Afterwards evinced symptoms of halting, though giving it to be understood that he would not remain in the Establishment in the event of the Evangelical party being driven out. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.31)


Watt, Alexander

Dalgety

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but avowed himself a warm admirer of patronage. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls, and generally acted with the Evangelical side. During the controversy, withdrew to the Continent, on the score of ill health, where he remained upwards of a year, having but little communication with his parish, or with the presbytery. In the course of his rambles, reached as far as Rome, and had his name called out in English during the Carnival; was at length summoned home by the Presbytery; and after his return, sided warmly with the Moderates, declaring that, during his residence abroad, he had enjoyed far better opportunities of studying the controversy than his brethren at home, , (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.70)


Waugh, Thomas

Deerness

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.104)


Weir, George

Abbey, Arbroath

Made a strong profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and occasionally took a part in public meetings and other demonstrations in their behalf. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill; and in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle’s bill. Since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to the parish of Humbie. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.79)


Weir, Walter

Walls and Flota

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion, and spiritual independence, and was an earnest and strenuous supporter of the Evangelical cause. In the Assembly of 1838, he voted for the independence resolutions; and in that of 1841, for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle’s bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Soon afterwards, he began to draw off from his former party. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.104)


Welsh, Alexander

Cranstown

Was a supporter of the Veto, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical party for several years after it had become the law of the Church; but when the controversy thickened, he ceased to support them, and on all important matters voted with their opponents. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.24)


Welsh, David

Carsphairn

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the popular election of the eldership. Was a member of Convocation, but did not subscribe to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.40)


White, James

Methlic

Formerly of Chalmers’ Church, Glasgow. While in that charge the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical side in all their measures. Since his settlement at Methlic has relapsed into Moderatism. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.86)


Whitson, John

Crossmichael

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the Independence resolutions; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. In the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.40)


Wilson, Alexander

Caputh

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly and zealously supported the Evangelical side. In 1838, concurred in the ordination of Mr Kessen, and was rebuked at the bar of the Civil Court. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions, and afterwards gave various public indications of an intention to withdraw from the Establishment. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.61)


Wilson, James

Abernyte

Throughout his incumbency a warm and zealous supporter of the Evangelical cause. Held strenuously the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence; and, in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Has of late years, through the pressure of years and infirmities, been laid aside from the performance of the active duties of the ministry. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.77)


Wilson, James

Chirnside

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but not particularly zealous in maintaining them. Generally supported the Evangelical cause when he took part in the business of Church Courts, which he was cautious in doing. Latterly inclined towards the Moderates, and after the Stewarton decision, voted with them for the exclusion of the quoad sacra brethren. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.29)


Wilson, John

Irvine

Long a zealous and active partizan of the Evangelical side, and an aspirant to leadership in the Presbytery. Cherished extreme anti-patronage sentiments when there were comparatively few to favour them. Of late years has acted entirely with the Moderates. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.43)


Wood, Alexander

Rosemarkie

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 1835, voted for the veto act and the chapel act, and opposed the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill, and continued his support of the Evangelical cause, in a greater or less degree, to the last. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.96)


Wyper, William

New Church, Annan

Originally connected with the Independent body; but circumstances having occurred to detach him from it, his case was warmly taken up by Dr Duncan, the Free Church minister of Ruthwell, by whose instrumentality he was received into the Establishment, and large contributions towards his place of worship made by the Evangelical party. Since the disruption he has been preaching in the Presbytery of Cupar, in Dundee, and elsewhere throughout the country where vacancies existed, and has ultimately succeeded, in securing a call from some residuum of a congregation about Paisley. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.35/a>


Yair, Joseph

Eckford

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but was very far from being active or zealous in their advocacy. In Church Courts generally extended a cautious support to the measures of the Evangelical side. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.31)


Young, James

Chryston

Belonged to the Evangelical side, but has not attended Church Courts for several years past. In the Assembly of 1836, supported the anti-patronage resolutions. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.53)


Young, Thomas

Gask

From the outset of his incumbency, a steady supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen’s bill. Concurred in all the proceedings by his Presbytery which led to the celebrated Auchterarder case, and in their refusals, at the successive stages of the proceedings, to take the presentee on trials, as required by the civil courts, and, on one of the latest occasions of the kind, moved the resolution to that effect. Concurred also in sending up anti-patronage overtures to the General Assembly. (McCosh, The Wheat and the Chaff, p.65)