Congregations 8


 

36. PRESBYTERY OF AUCHTERARDER

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ABERUTHVEN

Early in his ministry at Auchterarder, Dr. Smeaton began mission work here, and in 1848, with the assistance of friends, secured the appointment of a missionary. A church was erected in 1851. The charge was sanctioned in 1853. The manse was built in 1855. This was the only church in the district, the nearest being 3 miles distant. The population diminished with the decline of handloom weaving.

Membership

1855, 165;

1900, 124.

Ministers

J. MacDonald, M.A., 1853-1891

R. A. Reid, M.A., 1891 — .

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AUCHTERARDER

The congregation was formed here at the Disruption. A tent was erected for field preaching. The church was erected in 1843-44, and the manse in 1850. The “Auchterarder case” was naturally followed with the deepest interest here. It will be remembered that only two persons signed the call to Mr. Young. The Disruption period was one of profound spiritual quickening in the district. The Free church was the only place of worship for Auchterarder and the populous village of Aberuthven till 1851, when a church was built at the latter place.

Membership

1848, 770;

1900, 439.

Ministers

P. W. Robertson, M.A., 1855-1858

William Milne, 1858-1874

W. E. Brown, 1875-1883

Duncan Colvin, 1883-1893

William Todd, M.A., 1893-1899

G. A. F. Knight, M.A., 1899 — .

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BLACKFORD

This congregation was formed in the summer of 1843, through the efforts of Samuel Grant, minister of Ardoch. The church was built, and opened in December 1844. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. A school was erected in 1847, and the manse in 1851.

Membership

1848, 193;

1900, 189.

Ministers

Andrew Donald, M.A., 1845-1898

D. S. Maclachlan, M.A., 1891 — .

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BRACO (ARDOCH)

The minister of Ardoch quoad sacra parish, and a large proportion of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of the church in December following. The Free Church people were interdicted from burying in the parish churchyard, and had to secure ground for a separate cemetery. The church was built in 1843-44, and the manse in 1849. The rural population declined very rapidly.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 172.

Ministers

Samuel Grant, 1843-1846

Peter Grant, 1847-1850

John Williamson, 1851-1859

William Milne, M.A., 1860-1892

J. M. Rose, 1893 —

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COMRIE

The minister of Comrie and many of his people adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. Church and manse were forthwith erected. Services were held in different parts of the parish. In 1857, by the liberality of Mr. Drummond of Drumearn, a small church was built at St. Fillans. A new church was erected in Comrie in 1879 with a legacy left by a member of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 613;

1900, 308.

Ministers

James Carment, 1843-1880

C. D. Kay, D.D., 1880-1887

A. C. Watt, M.A., 1888 — .

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CRIEFF

The minister of the West quoad sacra church, and many of his people, “came out” in 1843. In 1848 they were deprived of their church, and built another in Commissioner Street. The manse was built in 1863. A new church was erected in 1882. A building, formerly an Original Secession church, of which Thomas M’Crie (junior) was minister, was bought by Mr. Campbell of Monzie, and gifted to the congregation. The town declined with the failure of the weaving industry, but later in the century it flourished greatly as a health resort.

Membership

1848, 600;

1900, 555.

Ministers

F. Macalister, 1843-1862

A. Henderson, D.D., 1862 — .

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DUNNING

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining a site. The congregation worshipped in a tent, until a church, near the Dunning Burn, was opened in February 1844. A school was erected, and maintained till 1872, when it was made over to the School Board. The manse was built in 1853. The population greatly decreased, owing to the disappearance of a once flourishing weaving trade.

Membership

1848, 200;

1900, 189.

Ministers

C. C. Stewart, 1843-1847

R. S. Clazy, M.A., 1896 — .

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MADDERTY

Regular supply was provided for Madderty immediately after the Disruption, and the charge was sanctioned in August 1844. Delayed by difficulty in securing a site, church and manse were not built till 1845. Both were renovated in 1891, an addition being made to the manse. The district is entirely rural. The population steadily decreased after 1843.

Membership

1848, 163;

1900, 88.

Ministers

Thomas Gunn, M.A., 1844-1886

L. C. M. Wedderburn, M.A., 1874 — .

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MONZIE

The minister of Monzie, with three-fourths of the entire population of the parish, and six of the eight elders, “came out” in 1843. The parish church being open and unoccupied, they worshipped there for two Sabbaths. After that they met in the open air, until the wooden church, erected at the sole charge of Alexander Campbell of Monzie, was opened in August 1843. The manse was built in 1861. A new church was erected in 1869, on the border of Monzie, Foulis Wester, and Crieff, serving all these parishes.

Membership

1848, 371;

1900, 210.

Ministers

J. R. Omond, D.D., 1843-1892

George Henderson, B.D., 1880 — .

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MUTHILL

Those who adhered to the Free Church in Muthill were formed into a congregation immediately after the Disruption. Church and manse were soon erected. A new church was built in 1896, the old church becoming the village public hall. Handloom weaving was the main industry, but some practised other trades as well. Masons, e.g., worked at their trade in summer and at the looms in winter. The population decreased with the decline of weaving.

Membership

1848, 418;

1900, 201.

Ministers

W. Douglas, 1843-1874

J. A. Fletcher, 1874-1880

A. N. Sutherland, M.A., 1881-1886

William Muir, B.D., B.L, 1886-1890

John Laidlaw, B.D., 1890 — .

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37. PRESBYTERY OF DUNFERMLINE

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ABERDOUR

The congregation here was organised immediately after the Disruption, and church and manse were erected. The popularity of the place as a summer resort was helpful to the congregation.

Membership

1848, 318;

1900, 117.

Ministers

David Purves, 1843-1853

William Ross, LL. D., 1854-1865

Thomas Ireland, 1866-1877

John Brown, 1878 — .

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CARNOCK

William Gilston, minister of the parish, and many of his people, “came out” at the Disruption. The church was built, and opened in October 1843. The manse was erected in 1848-49, on a site granted by Adam Rolland of Gask and Luscar. A new church, the memorial-stone of which was laid by the Earl of Moray, was built in 1898-99. The opening of the Forth Iron Works at Oakley brought a great increase of membership in the “fifties” and “sixties,” but by the closing of the works it was much reduced in numbers.

Membership

1848, 165;

1900, 109.

Ministers

W. Gilston, 1843-1881

Thomas Scott, M.A., 1882-1886

Adam M’Alpine, 1887 — .

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CULROSS

John Balfour, one of the parish ministers, adhered to the Free Church in 1843, but at once left the district. [Vol.1 implies he was minister till he died in 1845.} A congregation was, however, organised, and in 1846 it was recognised as a station. A church was built in 1847. The charge was sanctioned in 1867, mining operations having brought a change for the better in the district. A manse, having the ancient right of sanctuary attached to it, was purchased in 1873. A hall was built in 1883, and dedicated to the memory of the Rev. W. C. Stephen, formerly session clerk. In 1873 a legacy of £1500 was received from Robert Kilgour, the annual interest to supplement the minister’s stipend.

Membership

1869, 92;

1900, 113.

Ministers

John Jenkins, M.A., 1871-1876

D. W. B. Fleming, 1877 — .

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DUNFERMLINE – ABBEY

The minister of the Abbey Church was enrolled a member of the Free Church Assembly at the Disruption, but shortly afterwards withdrew from the Free Church, “in consequence of conscientious scruples as to the change recently made by him.” A congregation was at once organised, consisting of those who had “come out” of the Abbey Church, and a congregation of Original Seceders who had joined the Church of Scotland in 1893 [1839]. Their church in Canmore Street was purchased, and opened for the new congregation in January 1844. A manse was acquired shortly afterwards. A new church was erected on the old site in 1883-84. The manse was sold in 1890, and a new one erected.

Membership

1848, 400;

1900, 558.

Ministers

Alexander Philip, M.A., 1845-1849

James Mackenzie, M.A., 1849-1869

J. M. Shiach, M.A., 1870 —

Alexander Badenoch, M.A., 1890 — .

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DUNFERMLINE – NORTH

The minister and congregation of this Church Extension charge adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to use the church until deprived of it by interdict in 1849. A new church was erected in 1849, and a manse in 1872. The church, situated in the centre of the town, drew its members from a wide area. Mission work was carried on in outlying parts.

Membership

1848, 379;

1900, 444.

Ministers

Charles Marshall, 1843-1882

James B. Brown, M.A., 1866 — .

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DUNFERMLINE – ST. ANDREW’S

The minister of this charge, with his congregation, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption, and retained their church for two years, when, after litigation, they were obliged to leave it. A new church was built, and opened in 1847. The manse was erected in 1861.

Membership

1848, 343;

1900, 401.

Ministers

A. Sutherland, M.A., 1843-1855

Andrew Brydie, 1856-1875

D. Imrie, 1876 — .

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LASSODIE

This congregation was formed as a station in 1866 to meet the needs of a growing mining population. The church was built in 1869 on land granted under the feu charter of James Dewar of Lassodie. The charge was sanctioned in 1874. The manse was erected in 1877. Originally in the Presbytery of Kinross, it was transferred to that of Dunfermline in 1881, at the request of the minister.

Membership

1875, 155;

1900, 167.

Ministers

James Clark, M.A., 1874-1900

J. W. Duncan, M.A., 1900 — .

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NORTH QUEENSFERRY

Regular services were provided here at the close of 1874. A church was erected, and opened in July 1878. The charge was sanctioned in 1881. The manse was built in 1890. The building of the Forth Bridge brought great numbers to the district when the congregation was formed. Captain Elder of St. Margaret’s gave much valued assistance.

Membership

1881, 57;

1900, 98.

Minister

A. S. Wilson, M.A., B.Sc., 1881—..

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SALINE

This congregation was organised in August 1843, at the request of Free Church residents in the district. The church was erected, and opened in June 1844. The manse was built in 1845.

Membership

1848, 243;

1900, 158.

Ministers

J. Robertson, 1843-1866

James Masson, 1867-1875

J. Calder, 1876 — .

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TORRYBURN

The minister of Torryburn, and four-fifths of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped for a time in a shed fitted up by the proprietor. The church was built in 1843, and the manse a few years later. Both were renovated in 1869, when the earthen floor of the church was replaced by one of wood.

Membership

1848, 243;

1900, 98.

Ministers

Thomas Doig, M.A., 1843-1866

Alexander Lundie, 1867 — .

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TOWN HILL

In response to a request for ordinances from local residents, the Home Mission Committee, in 1883, provided an iron church here, which was at once crowded. The charge was sanctioned in 1884. The manse was built in 1888, and a new church in 1893.

Membership

1885, 194;

1900, 267.

Ministers

J. B. Smellie, 1884-1887

A. Thomson Miller, 1887 — .

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TULLIALLAN

After long hesitation the minister of Tulliallan, in June 1843, decided to remain in the Establishment. A Free Church congregation was organised in August, and a temporary place of worship secured. The new church was opened in 1844. A congregation of Old Light Burghers in the village of Kincardine, who had joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, adhered to the Free Church andunited with Tulliallan Free Church, the minister, James Duncan, being translated in December 1843. The manse was erected in 1849. The church was renovated and a hall added in 1871. By arrangement with the Presbytery of Dunblane, to which it originally belonged, the congregation was transferred to that of Dunfermline.

Membership

1848, 250;

1900, 147.

Ministers

W. Gillespie, 1844-1858

James Freer, 1859-1862

J. W. Laurie, M.A., 1862-1893

David Smith, D.D., 1894 — .

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38. PRESBYTERY OF KINROSS

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BLAIRINGONE

Andrew Noble, minister of this chapel-of-ease, “came out” in 1843. The church building, claimed by the Established Church, stood empty till 1849. It was found impossible to maintain a Free Church congregation here, and when the minister was translated to Fossoway, Blairingone was reduced to a station.

Minister

Andrew Noble, 1843-1844

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COWDENBEATH

A station was established here in 1856 to meet the needs of what was then a growing mining village. The congregation worshipped in a public hall till their own church was opened in 1863. The charge was sanctioned in 1872. A new church was erected in 1891. A manse was also built.

Membership

1873, 100;

1900, 384.

Ministers

Andrew Anderson, 1874-1889

James Muir, B.D., 1889-1896

T. Mitchell, 1896 — .

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FOSSOWAY

The minister of this parish was enrolled a member of the Free Church Assembly at the Disruption, but he repented the step, and in January 1844 was declared to be no longer a minister of the Free Church. The congregation was organised by the Presbytery of Kinross, and a church was erected. A fruitless attempt was made to unite the congregations of Blairingone and Fossoway. In 1844 the Fossoway congregation called the minister of Blairingone, and the latter was reduced to a station.

Membership

1848, 197;

1900, 151.

Ministers

Andrew Noble, 1844-1847

Thos. Gillison, 1849-1896

Alexander Murray, M.A., 1895 — .

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KELTY

William Wallace Duncan, minister of Cleish parish, and many of his people, “came out” at the Disruption. A Free Church congregation was formed in the village of Kelty. Mr. Duncan was shortly translated to Peebles, and not till May 1844 was the congregation in a position to call a minister. A church was erected forthwith. The manse was built in 1893. A new church was erected, and opened in 1894. Kelty became an important mining centre, and the congregation grew with the increase of the population.

Membership

1848, 70;

1900, 286.

Ministers

W. W. Duncan, M.A., 1843

James Cullen, 1844-1874

William Stephen, 1876 — .

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KINROSS

The congregation here was formed at the Disruption, and church and manse were erected. The population declined through fluctuations of trade, and especially in consequence of the passing away of handloom weaving.

Membership

1848, 230;

1900, 202.

Minister

John Wright, M.A., 1844 — .

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MILNATHORT See ORWELL.

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ORWELL (MILNATHORT)

This congregation, formerly Old Light Burgher, joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, and adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The church, built in 1741-42, was rebuilt in 1821. The manse was erected in 1850. In 1845 the Presbytery resolved that the church should bear the name of the parish (Orwell), not that of the village (Milnathort).

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 155.

Ministers

J. Thornton, 1843-1874

J. Henderson, 1848-1853

W. C. Smith, D.D., LL. D., 1854-1858

A. S. Mitchell, M.A., 1859-1882

A. M. Sutherland, 1883-1897

R. W. Macnaughton, M.A., 1898 — .

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PORTMOAK AND FLOCKHOUSE

The minister of the parish, and a considerable portion of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were erected at Portmoak. Services at Flockhouse were conducted in the school. Many of the congregation in early days were employed in weaving. Mining operations in the Ballingry district were begun later.

Membership

1848, 230;

1900, 116.

Ministers

Hugh Laird, D.D., 1843-1849

James Swinton, 1850-1877

James A. Paton, M.A., 1877-1879

John Bethune, 1880-1886

S. Thomson, 1887-1893

C. Mason, 1893 — .

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STRATHMIGLO – NORTH

This congregation, originally Reformed Presbyterian, united with the Free Church in 1876, and was placed in the Presbytery of Cupar. In 1891 it was transferred to that of Kinross. The property consisted of church and manse. A union was effected in 1899 between this congregation and that of Strathmiglo, South. Many members who were opposed to the union left the church.

Membership

1877, 131;

1900, 158.

Ministers

[Thomas Martin, 1876-1879 – Vol.1]

Nathan Cosh, 1876-1885

Charles Davidson, 1886-1899 [Vol.1 and entry unter Hightae says he was translated in 1900.]

J. M. Munro, 1900 — .

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STRATHMIGLO – SOUTH

A congregation of the adherents of the Free Church was formed here soon after the Disruption. A church was erected in 1843, and a manse in 1847. When the first minister died in 1889, a fruitless effort was made to unite the two Free Church congregations in Strathmiglo. The South Church was put in charge of an “ordained preacher”; an arrangement continued till 1899, when the two congregations were united to form Strathmiglo Free Church. There was then a large secession to the Established Church.

Membership

1848, 236

1893, 97

Minister

W. Macara, 1844-1889

[Thomas Paterson, 1895-1900 Vol.1]

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LUMPHINNANS [station]

This congregation was organised on the footing of a preaching station in 1896, and a temporary iron church was erected. The membership in 1900 was 75.

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39. PRESBYTERY OF KIRKCALDY

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BUCKHAVEN

In response to a request from Free Church residents here, a station was established in 1866. Church and manse were erected, and in 1875 the charge was sanctioned. The development of the mining industry brought increase of the population.

Membership

1876, 153;

1900, 240.

Minister

William M’Ghie, 1875 — .

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BURNTISLAND

The minister of Burntisland “came out” at the Disruption. Through the liberality of a friend he was able at once to erect a place of worship. A manse was provided at Craigholm Crescent. A new church was built in High Street in 1861. The congregation profited by the shale works at Binnend, which employed 800 men. The opening of the Forth Bridge, and the failure of the shale works the same year, told heavily against Burntisland, which till then had been a railway terminus. The development of the coal export trade somewhat improved conditions again. While the shale works lasted at Binnend a lay missionary was employed there, a hall having been erected for the services.

Membership

1848. 380;

1900, 441.

Ministers

David Couper, D.D., 1843-1882

T. B. Kilpatrick, D.D., 1882-1888

A. W. Kinmont, M.A.. 1888 — .

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DYSART

The minister of the parish, and a considerable congregation, “came out” in 1843. The church was erected in 1844, and the manse in 1851. In 1874 the church was sold to the Earl of Rosslyn, and a new church was built. The linen and mining industries in the town and district improved after 1843, but the town suffered from failure of the spinning industry.

Membership

1848, 170;

1900, 296.

Ministers

John Thomson, 1843-1848

N. M. L. Walker, D.D., 1850 —

James Laing, M.A., 1892 — .

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EAST WEMYSS

This congregation was formed in June 1843, and regular services provided. They worshipped in the open air, or, when weather was bad, in a hall over Dr. Small’s stables, until in 1846 their church was ready for use. A manse also was erected. A catechist employed at West Wemyss had gathered a congregation in a church belonging to the proprietor. As a majority of the people adhered to the Free Church, the proprietor granted use of the building for Free Church services. The catechist was ordained and settled there in November 1843. Just then it became known that permission to use the building was to be withdrawn. The newly ordained minister generously agreed to retire, and the congregation continued as a mission till 1854. In 1857 a school and teacher’s house were built at East Wemyss. These were subsequently occupied as a church hall. About 140 members from East Wemyss attached themselves to the new charge at Buckhaven. The population in the district greatly increased, but only a small proportion could be attracted to church.

Membership

1848, 331;

1900, 324.

Ministers

G. F. Knight, M.A., 1844-1891

L. A. Muirhead, D.D., 1881-1892 [Vol.1 says he was translated 1893.]

J. C. B. Geddes, 1893 — .

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KENNOWAY

After the Disruption services were provided at Milton, and a church was built at Windygates. By March 1844 services at Milton had become unnecessary, and at the request of the local Free Church residents a station was established at Kennoway, in connection with an “Old Light” congregation, in whose church services were at first held. The charge was sanctioned in 1848, in which year their own church was opened. A station was established at Windygates in 1897.

Membership

1855, 163;

1900, 158.

Ministers

John Lister, B.A., 1849-1856

D. M. Macalister, 1858-1878

G. Campbell, 1878 — .

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KINGHORN

In the summer of 1843 a Free Church Association was formed here. Regular services were provided in November of that year, and in May 1844 a probationer was appointed to superintend the congregation. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. The church was erected in 1846, and the manse in 1850. A succession of industrial failures greatly retarded the progress of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 108;

1900, 129.

Ministers

J. H. Ballingall, 1846-1879

Charles Shaw, 1880-1886

Alex. Mitchell, 1886 — .

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KINGLASSIE

In July 1843 occasional supply was provided here. A church was erected in 1844. Occupying a central position in a large district good progress was made, and the charge was sanctioned in 1845.

Membership

1848, 130;

1900, 212.

Ministers

John Speirs, 1845-1878

A. D. Paterson, M.A. (ordained preacher), 1878-1887

G. C. Dalziel, B.D., 1890 — .

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KIRKCALDY – ABBOTSHALL

The minister of the parish, together with a substantial congregation, “came out” in 1843, and formed the Free Church congregation of Abbotshall. Church and manse were erected.

Membership

1848, 330;

1900, 385.

Ministers

A. O. Laird, 1843-1848

J. R. Simpson, 1848-1858 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1858.]

W. Gibson, 1858-1878

A. MacMillan, M.A., 1878—.

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KIRKCALDY – DUNNIKIER

This congregation represents the Antiburgher section of the Linktown congregation of Seceders, from which a large minority seceded at the union of the Antiburgher and Burgher synods in 1820. It joined the Free Church in 1852. The church had been built in 1763. The manse was in Townsend Place. A new manse was acquired at Old Dunnikier House, Pathhead.

Membership

1859, 241;

1900, 415.

Ministers

James Black, M.A., 1852-1880

William Fairweather, D.D., 1881 — .

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KIRKCALDY – GALLATOWN

In response to a request from “Gallatown Mission Committee” in 1857, a station was established here. A church was erected in 1861-62, and services were conducted by probationers under the Home Mission Committee. The charge was sanctioned in 1875. The manse was built in 1877. A new church was erected in 1883, the old one being used as a hall. The development of mining, floor-cloth and linoleum manufacture, and tramways, added greatly to the population.

Membership

1876, 136;

1900, 274.

Ministers

A. D. Donaldson, M.A., 1875-1878

William Agnew, 1878-1898

W. H. Harrowes, M.A., 1899 — .

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KIRKCALDY – INVERTIEL

The minister of this Church Extension charge, with a considerable congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They were not deprived of the building till 1856. A new church and manse were erected during Mr. Macaulay’s ministry.

Membership

1848, 330;

1900, 355.

Ministers

J. Isdale, 1843-1856

G. Macaulay, 1856-1863

W. Milne, M.A., 1864 — .

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KIRKCALDY – PATHHEAD

The minister of this Church Extension charge, with his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. After about nine months they were deprived of the building, and were afforded the use of the Secession church until their own was opened in May 1844. The manse was built in 1849. The church walls were heightened, and galleries put in, in 1856. A church hall was added in 1873. The manse was sold in 1897, and a new one purchased in Loughborough Road. The growth of engineering, linen, linoleum, and cabinetmaking industries added considerably to the population.

Membership

1848, 415;

1900, 565.

Ministers

C. Jameson, 1843-1870

J. Cameron, 1870-1874

John Buchan, 1875-1888

Alfred Coutts, B.D., 1889-1899

D. Gray, M.A., 1899 — .

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KIRKCALDY – ST. BRYCEDALE

The minister of the parish, and a large congregation,”came out” in 1843. The Secession congregation of Cowan Street or Port Brae, which joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, also “came out,” and joined with this congregation. They worshipped in Port Brae quoad sacra church till November 1844, when the Tolbooth Church was opened. The first manse was built in 1851. A new manse was erected in 1873. A new church was built in 1881, on a site gifted by Provost Swan, of St. Brycedale House; hence it was called St. Brycedale. The development of Kirkcaldy in manufactures and commerce brought a great increase of population.

Membership

1848, 570;

1900, 893.

Ministers

J. Alexander, D.D., 1843-1863

H. M. Douglas, 1860-1866

G. W. Thomson, D.D., 1867-1874

James Stalker, D.D., 1874-1887

W. J. Macdonald, M.A., 1887 — .

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LESLIE

At the Disruption the adherents of the Free Church here formed a congregation, and worshipped in the Original Secession church till their own church, in Murray Place, built in 1844, was ready for occupation. They were ministered to by Mr. Laird, who, engaged by Mr. Fergus, the proprietor of Prinlaws Mill, had been working at Prinlaws, Leslie. Until his settlement in October, Mr. Fergus generously continued his salary. The manse was built in 1850. A new church, in High Street, was erected in 1879.

Membership

1848, 272;

1900, 227.

Ministers

H. M. Laird, 1843-1852

P. W. Robertson, M.A., 1852-1855

John Logan, 1855-1894

John Urquhart, 1889-1892

R. T. Fairbairn, M.A., 1893 — .

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LEVEN

This congregation was formed of those who “came out” of Scoonie Church in 1843. A church was built, and opened in December following. The manse was built in 1846. A new church was erected in 1871. The old church was sold, and converted into the Town Hall. In 1897 the Bain Hall was gifted to the congregation by David Bain of Bellevue Cottage, the last survivor of the original contributors to the first Free church in Leslie. In 1867 a number of members joined the new congregation in Buckhaven, and in 1893 several associated themselves with the church opened in Methil. Through the opening of docks at Methil, and the development of the coal industry, the population of the district greatly increased.

Membership

1848, 280;

1900, 453.

Ministers

Adam Forman, M.A., 1843-1865 [Vol.1 and under Innerwick says he was translated here in 1844.]

D. Fergusson, 1865-1897

J. J. Mackay, M.A., 1881-1884

H. Y. Reyburn, B.D., 1884-1893

Hugh Elder, M.A., 1893 — .

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LOCHGELLY

In 1849 services were arranged for in a subscription school, and continued by ministers of the Presbytery and probationers, until the charge was sanctioned in 1856. The church was erected in 1857, and the manse in 1860. The church was enlarged by putting in a gallery in 1880; and a hall was added in 1884. The whole district underwent an entire change, through the opening of the rich coal-fields of west Fife, and many new congregations sprang up in the wide district at first served by Lochgelly.

Membership

1859, 153;

1900, 453.

Ministers

P. Macainsh, 1856 — [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1892.]

Duncan Brown, M.A.. 1892 — .

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MARKINCH

The minister of the parish, and many of his people, “came out” in 1843. The church and manse were built and presented to the congregation by two lady members.

Membership

1848, 412;

1900, 320.

Ministers

J. Sievewright, D.D., 1843-1852

Ninian Jamieson, 1853-1857

Alexander Anderson, 1858-1863 [-1873, Vol.1]

A. B. Campbell, 1864-1897

Alex. Macinnes, M.A., 1897 — .

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METHIL

The quoad sacra parish church here was shut up after the Disruption. For many years mission work was carried on by Leven Free Church and by the students of New College. In 1852 a station was formed. It was discontinued in 1860, evening service and Sabbath school only being maintained. Full mission work was resumed in 1888. The charge was sanctioned in 1894; and a brick church was erected. The docks, the mining, and export coal trades largely increased the population.

Membership

1895, 200;

1900, 213.

Minister

Robert Francis, 1894 — .

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THORNTON

A station was established here in 1895 to meet the growing needs of the village as a railway and mining centre. Services were held in the public school, until a hall, designed as the hall of the future church, was ready for occupation.

Membership

1900, 101.

Minister

Thos. Orr, 1900 — .

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WINDYGATES

This congregation is the outcome of the mission enterprise of Kennoway Free Church. Owing to the development of the mining and distilling industries the mission made rapid progress, and in 1899 the charge was sanctioned. The church, which had been erected as a public hall, was bought by the congregation. The manse was purchased in 1900.

Membership

1900, 108.

Minister

Robert Stewart, 1899 — .

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40. PRESBYTERY OF CUPAR

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ABDIE AND NEWBURGH

The ministers of these parishes adhered to the Establishment. Those who adhered to the Free Church were formed into a congregation under the minister of Dunbog, who with many of his people “came out” at the Disruption. A favourable site was granted by the Earl of Zetland, and church and manse were erected.

Membership

1848, 190;

1900, 132.

Ministers

John Murray, 1843-1882

J. D. Williamson, M.A., 1882-1891

A. H. Davidson, 1891 — .

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AUCHTERMUCHTY

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, and services were at once provided. Church and school were built in 1843 on a site generously given by the Misses Moncrieff of Southfield. Much gratuitous labour was given. The manse was erected in 1846.

Membership

1848, 194;

1900, 180.

Ministers

John Renton, 1843-1875

William Affleck, B.D., 1867 — .

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CERES

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, and Sabbath evening services were provided by members of Presbytery. At first public worship was held in a wooden structure; but before long a substantial church and manse were erected. The congregation suffered from decay of the weaving industry; and also, unfortunately, at one period from internal discord.

Membership

1848, 214;

1900, 92.

Ministers

J. Donaldson, 1844-1879

J. W. Geddie, 1861-1864

David Imrie, 1865-1876

A. Macmillan, M.A., 1876-1878

J. P. Berry, 1879 — .

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COLLESSIE

The minister of the parish, and a considerable congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church, manse, and school were erected at Giffordtown. It was at one time intended to unite the congregations of Collessie and Monimail under one minister; but the growth of Ladybank made this impracticable. In 1875 the congregation removed to Ladybank, where a new church had been erected.

Membership

1848, 190;

1900, 253.

Ministers

J. Macfarlane, D.D., 1843-1844

William Reid, 1844-1854

J. A. Anderson, 1855-1866

James Cameron, 1866-1870

Hugh Ross, 1870-1883

P. C. Stewart, M.A., 1884 — .

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CUPAR

The minister of Cupar, with a large congregation, “came out” in 1843. A church was built, and opened in November 1844. The manse was erected in 1849. A new church was built in 1878, the main cost being defrayed by a legacy left by Sir David Baxter of Kilmaron. Depopulation of the rural district in the vicinity of Cupar largely accounts for decrease in membership.

Membership

1848, 800;

1900, 472.

Ministers

Adam Cairns, D.D., 1843-1853

John Laird, D.D., 1853-1896

J. T. Ferguson, D.D., 1881.

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DAIRSIE

The parish minister, and a large majority of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. A church was erected on a site granted by David Meldrum of Craigfoodie, and opened in October 1843. Up till then worship was conducted in the open air, or in a joiner’s shop. A school was built in 1845, and maintained till the passing of the Education Act in 1872. The manse was erected in 1846. The church was renovated in 1876. The manse was burned down, and rebuilt in 1884. The estate of Craigfoodie, on which the buildings were erected, was bequeathed in 1876 to the Free Church by Mr. Meldrum, for behoof of the New College; his annual contribution to the Sustentation Fund of the congregation being a perpetual charge on the income.

Membership

1848, 243;

1900, 107.

Ministers

A. M. M’Gillivray, 1843-1873

John Murray, M.A., 1874 — .

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FALKLAND

The minister of Falkland, with many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. He conducted the first Free Church communion service on the West Green, on July 16, 1843. The congregation worshipped for five months in the Congregational church, and then in the Town Hall, till March 1845, when the new church was opened. An unfortunate division over the election of a successor to Dr. Smeaton retarded progress. The manse was built in 1867. Mrs. Deas, wife of the Provost of Falkland, and mother of Lord Deas, was a powerful supporter of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 142;

1900, 118.

Ministers

George Smeaton, D.D., 1843

Thomas Burnside, 1845-1867

A. Mackenzie, 1868-1900.

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FLISK AND CREICH

Dr. Taylor, minister of Flisk, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. The adherents of the Free Church in Flisk and Creich, and in the adjacent parts of Balmerino and Kilmany, were organised as a congregation, and Dr. Taylor was settled as minister in October 1843. The church was erected on a convenient site in 1843. The manse was built in 1844. The population of the district was mainly agricultural, and very sparse. It declined somewhat with the disappearance of handloom weaving.

Membership

1848, 130;

1900, 71.

Ministers

J. W. Taylor, D.D., 1843-1894

P. S. Mackintosh, M.A., 1884 — .

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KETTLE AND CULTS

The Free Church adherents in these parishes were formed into a congregation at the Disruption, and were greatly indebted for counsel and help to Mr. Heriot of Ramornie, afterwards Sheriff Maitland Heriot. The church was built on the border between the two parishes, about a mile from Kingskettle. The manse was erected about 1860. Depopulation accounts for fall in membership.

Membership

1848, 164;

1900, 131.

Ministers

Macadam Grigor, 1843-1854

William Stewart, 1854-1860

Alexander Maxwell, 1860-1879

W. L. Craig, M.A., 1879 — .

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LOGIE AND GAULDRY

The minister of Logie adhered to the Free Church in 1843. A church was built in the village of Logie, and opened in January 1844. A manse was erected in 1846. From May 1843 a station was maintained at Gauldry. At Mr. Melville’s death the Assembly directed the union of Logie and Gauldry in one charge, recommending that a church should be built on a site convenient for both. The proprietor, however, refused a site, and the charges remained separate, the churches being three miles apart. The union was effected in 1852. The majority of the people were at Gauldry, where a weaver’s shop was converted into a church in 1867. It was renovated in 1892. The district never recovered from the extinction of handloom weaving.

Membership,—1848, 103;

1900, 124.

Ministers

Andrew Melville, 1843-1848

G. R. Somerville, 1852 —

Donald Gray, M.A., 1890-1899

Thomas Crichton, M.A., 1899 — .

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MONIMAIL

The minister of the parish, and many of his people, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. A church was erected at Bow of Fife, and opened in 1844. The site was granted by D. M. Makgill Crichton, then of Rankeillor. The church was renovated in 1878. A new and beautiful church was built in 1898, and presented to the congregation by Sir Michael Nairn of Rankeillor. The population tended to decrease, but this did not affect the prosperity of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 146;

1900, 148.

Ministers

James Brodie, M.A., F.G.S., 1843-1878

William D. Beattie, 1877 — .

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