Congregations 5


 

21. PRESBYTERY OF HAMILTON

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AIRDRIE – BROOMKNOLL

This congregation, formerly Burgher (Associate Synod), joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, and adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The church was built in 1806, and the manse in 1826. The deed conveying the property to the Established Church was on the point of completion when the Disruption took place. The transaction was not concluded, and the congregation retained the buildings. A new manse was erected in 1875, and a new church in 1889.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 508.

Ministers

James Findlay, M.A., 1843-1844

James M’Gown, 1846-1864

William Reid, 1867 — .

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AIRDRIE – GRAHAM STREET

Originally Reformed Presbyterian, this congregation joined the Free Church in 1876. The church was built in 1833. From the retiral of Mr. Berry in 1886 till the ordination of Mr. Campbell in 1890, the church was in charge of a succession of probationers. The manse was purchased in 1898.

Membership

1877, 73;

1900, 182.

Ministers

David Berry, 1876-1886

Charles Campbell, B.D., 1890 — .

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AIRDRIE – HIGH

The congregation of this quoad sacra church adhered to the Free Church in 1843. No steps were taken to deprive the congregation of the use of the church, on which there was a considerable debt. It was built in 1838. In 1853 the Established Presbytery surrendered their right of property in the building, a stated sum being paid to them. The manse was erected in 1846.

Membership

1848, 400;

1900, 441.

Ministers

Robert Stirrat, 1843-1845

R. W. Lawson, 1845-1895

John Cook, B.D., 1889 — .

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AIRDRIE – WEST

William Jackson, minister of the West parish, “came out” in 1843 with many of his congregation. The church was built in 1844, a vestry being added in 1845. A schoolhouse was erected in 1848, afterwards used as hall and church-officer’s house. The manse was purchased in 1849. In 1856 a dwelling-house was bought for the schoolmaster. The town was a great centre of the coal trade. Later, engineering and iron works, a cotton mill, and tube works, employed a large population.

Membership

1848, 360;

1900, 374.

Ministers

William Jackson, M.A., 1843-1869

J. A. George, M.A., 1870-1878

William Gillespie, 1879 — .

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BAILLIESTON, MURE MEMORIAL

This was the first congregation fostered by the Miners’ Mission of the Free Church. Services were begun in 1873. In June 1874 an iron church, the gift of the children of the Free Church, was opened. The congregation profited greatly by the revival of 1874. The charge was sanctioned in 1875. Mrs. Mure Macredie of Perceton gave £1000 to aid in building a church at Baillieston in memory of her husband and two sons. The Mure Memorial Church was erected and opened in October 1882. An old house on the church feu was unfortunately made into the manse. Owing to damp it had to be vacated in 1900. The Braehead Mission, started in 1873, was put under care of this congregation. The failure of the City of Glasgow Bank, the partial failure of coal-mining in the district, and the erection of an Established Church, adversely affected the growth of the congregation.

Membership

1876, 154;

1900, 186.

Ministers

John White, M.A., 1875-1877

Alexander M’Millan, 1878 — .

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BELLSHILL

Services begun here in September 1873 were for a time held in Mossend school. The charge was sanctioned in 1874. Church, hall, and manse were erected in 1875. The rapid growth of the population, employed in coal mines and iron works, favoured the development of the congregation.

Membership

1875, 143;

1900, 477.

Minister

William Macdonald, 1874 — .

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BLANTYRE

James Anderson, minister of the parish, and many of his people, “came out” in 1843. At the outset the congregation was greatly indebted to Mrs. Hutton of Calderbank for sympathy and support. A church was built forthwith, and a manse in 1846. In 1871 the church was burned down. For a time the congregation worshipped in the parish church, kindly offered by the minister, Paton J. Gloag; and afterwards in the schoolroom of Blantyre works. A new church was built, and opened in October 1872. In 1891 it was enlarged by the introduction of galleries.

Membership

1848, 180;

1900, 282.

Ministers

James Anderson, 1843-1860

Robert Macdonald, 1860-1881

James Campbell, 1882 — .

BLANTYRE – EAST

Services were begun here in 1878, and a mission hall erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1889. The church was built in 1892. The only industry was coal-mining, and the population steadily increased up to 1900.

Membership

1890, 141;

1900, 185.

Minister

John Burleigh, 1889 — .

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BOTHWELL

The congregation was formed here at the Disruption by local adherents of the Free Church. Church and manse were built in 1844. A new church was erected, and additions made to the manse in 1860. Bothwell Free Church at first supplied the wants of a wide district, including Bellshill, Uddingston, and Blantyre. The provision of churches at these places restricted the membership at Bothwell.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 259.

Ministers

John Buchanan, M.A., 1844-1858 [According to Vol.1, he became senior minister in 1856 – but he was very active after that in various places.]

John Harper, M.A., 1859-1875

Andrew Doak, M.A., 1872-1879

J. A. Fletcher, 1880-1894

Douglas Ferrier, M.A., 1894 — .

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BOTHWELL – PARK

This congregation began as a mission station on February 12, 1897. A lady gifted £600 through Mr. Macdonald of Bellshill. This made possible the erection of a hall. The charge was sanctioned in 1899. The village is made up almost entirely of miners’ rows, with a population of some 2000. Those who were brought into the congregation, for the most part had no previous Church connection.

Membership

1900, 167.

Minister

John R. Bruce, 1899 — .

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CAMBUSLANG

Services were begun here in 1846. The church was erected in 1856, and in that year the charge was sanctioned. The manse was built in 1870. The church was enlarged in 1878, and reconstructed in 1898. There were also two halls. Mining and weaving were at first the main industries. Westward the town became a residential resort. To the east were the works of the Steel Company of Scotland, with workmen’s dwellings.

Membership

1859, 120

1900, 497

Ministers

J. L. Marr, 1857-1859

G. C. Minty, 1859-1862

R. J. Sandeman, D.D., 1862-1867

A. D. Johnston, D.D., 1868-1877 [He is A. O. Johnston – see Vol.1.]

H. G. Shepherd, M.A., 1877 —

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CAMBUSNETHAN

Work was carried on for some years here on the basis of a preaching station. The church was built in 1851. The charge was sanctioned in 1854.

Membership

1859, 212

1900, 304

Ministers

P. G. Millar, 1854-1892

W. M. Clow, D.D., 1881-1886

Charles Steele, M.A., 1886-1895

Andrew Aitken, 1895-1898

F. Cairns, 1898 — .

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CHAPELHALL

Services were conducted here for a time by a probationer. The church was erected about 1856. The charge was sanctioned in 1857. The congregation met at first in Prentice’s Hall, then in a wooden building, until the church was opened. The manse was built in 1863. The main industries were coal-mining and steel manufacture.

Membership

1859, 92;

1900, 242.

Ministers

Alexander Stewart, 1859-1868

H. M. Mackenzie, 1869-1883

James Jack, 1884-1893

Robert Asher, B.D., 1894 — .

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CHAPELTON

David Paton, minister of Chapelton quoad sacra church, and nearly all his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of their church, and for a time worshipped in the open air; then in the school. A church was built very soon, in spite of much opposition from influential quarters. The decline of handloom weaving seriously affected the congregation, no other industry taking its place. The congregation was reduced to a preaching station in 1849. Sanction was restored in 1855. A new church was built in 1888. The congregation was joined by a number from the Relief Church.

Membership

1859, 170;

1900, 132.

Ministers

David Paton, 1843-1844

Robert Young, 1845-1847

William Campbell, 1856-1863

John Leiper, 1864-1876

W. R. Paton, 1876 —

R. R. Hewitt, 1893 — .

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CLELAND

This congregation was begun as a mission station by the Free Church of Cambusnethan. The church was built in 1877. The charge was sanctioned in 1879. The manse was erected in 1881. The planting of a new Established Church, and the disjunction of a number of members who were dissatisfied over an election of office-bearers, hindered the progress of the congregation.

Membership

1880, 95;

1900, 204.

Ministers

George Booth, 1879-1882

Thomas Ramage, 1883-1887

George Home, M.A., 1887 — .

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COATBRIDGE – EAST

This congregation, originally Reformed Presbyterian, begun in 1868, joined the Free Church in 1876. Church and manse were built in 1873.

Membership

1877, 501;

1900, 859.

Ministers

John Kay, D.D., 1876-1878

John Dickson, 1878-1882

P. A. G. Clark, 1882-1887

Adam Maxwell, 1888 — .

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COATBRIDGE – MIDDLE

This congregation was formed in 1843. They worshipped first in Brownlie’s smithy, then in Ronald’s Hall. After great difficulty a site was secured, and church, manse, and school erected. The school was made over to the School Board in 1873. In 1876 the church was sold to the Miners’ Mission, and a new church built. In 1889 the old manse was sold and a new one purchased.

Membership

1848, 264;

1900, 515.

Ministers

Samuel Connell, B.A., 1844-1858

William Graham, 1859-1860

John Henderson, 1861-1876

Alexander Ogilvy, M.A., 1877 — .

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COATBRIDGE – WEST

When the Middle congregation moved to their new building in 1876, some of the members remained in the old church, which had been purchased by the Miner’s Mission, and engaged in mission work. The charge was sanctioned the following year.

Membership

1878, 163;

1900, 113.

Ministers

William M’Killiam, M.A., 1877-1882

W. C. M’Dougall, 1883-1899.

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COATBRIDGE – WHIFFLET

In January 1874, a mission station was formed here for the benefit of the village of Carnbroe and Whifflet. An iron church was erected in 1875. The charge was sanctioned in 1879. The church was built in 1883, and the manse in 1896. The population of the district slowly but steadily increased.

Membership

1880, 102;

1900, 255.

Ministers

R. M’Grouther, 1879-1881

William Fulton, M.A., 1882 — .

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CRAIGNEUK

Regular services were begun here in 1884, held first in the public school, and then in a wooden building. The charge was sanctioned in 1891. The manse was built in 1893, and the church in 1897. The opening of new public works brought a considerable increase of population.

Membership

1892, 137;

1900, 164.

Minister

William Hood, M.A., 1891 — .

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EAST KILBRIDE

At the second meeting of Hamilton Free Church Presbytery, on June 29, 1843, Sir Henry W. Moncreiff, Bart., minister of East Kilbride, and three of his elders applied for admission to the Free Church. They were duly received. They worshipped first in a barn known as “the Spale Kirk.” The church was erected in 1845, and the manse in 1848. The church was subsequently enlarged and renovated.

Membership

1848, 160;

1900, 184.

Ministers

Sir H. W. Moncreiff, Bart., D.D., 1843-1852

R. G. Balfour, D.D., 1852-1858

J. Oswald Dykes, D.D., 1859-1861

W. Ross Taylor, D.D., 1862-1868

R. A. Mitchell, M.A., 1869-1877

Thomas Pearson, M.A., 1877-1899

E. E. Andersen, M.A., 1899 — . [His surname is Anderson in Vol.1.]

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GREENGAIRS

Services begun in 1873 were held for a time in the village school. Church and manse were erected in 1874, in which year the charge was sanctioned.

Membership

1875, 94;

1900, 84.

Ministers

A. S. Houston, 1874-1881

Thomas Brown, M.A., 1882-1897

D. B. Muir, M.A., 1897 — [Vol.1 says he was translated to Glasgow – London Road, 1900.]

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HAMILTON – ST. JOHN’S

William Buchan, minister of this quoad sacra church, and his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. After the Disruption, at a meeting of subscribers towards the erection of the church, the building was handed over to trustees who held it on behalf of the congregation. A school was erected. The manse was built about 1872. It was acquired by the North British Railway Company in 1880. A new manse was purchased in 1884. St. John’s school was carried on under the rectorship of John Adams and others till 1898, when it was taken over by the School Board. West and Low Waters congregations were off-shoots from St. John’s.

Membership

1848, 320;

1900, 489.

Ministers

William Buchan, 1843-1869

P. W. Robertson, M.A., 1870-1875

G. Wallace, D.D., 1875 — .

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HAMILTON – LOW WATERS

For twenty years work had been carried on here by St. John’s congregation. Latterly it was put on the footing of a preaching station; and the services were held in a hall which was designed to form part of the permanent church buildings. The charge was sanctioned in 1897. The population of the district had greatly increased within twenty-five years, owing to the large coalfields of Cadzow, Eddlewood, and Neilsland.

Membership

1898, 125;

1900, 144.

Minister

Robert Mitchell, B.D., 1897 — .

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HAMILTON – WEST

This congregation, an offshoot from St. John’s, was begun as a preaching station in 1874. The church was erected in 1875, in which year the charge was sanctioned. In 1882 a new church was built, the old one having become structurally unsafe. The congregation was greatly indebted to the liberality of Alexander Kirkpatrick of Allanshaw and his family. Designed at first to supply the spiritual needs of the miners flocking into Hamilton, especially Burnbank, the charge was called “Hamilton, Burnbank.” In 1881 the name was changed to “Hamilton, West.”

Membership

1876, 139;

1900, 476.

Minister

Thomas M. B. Paterson, 1875 — .

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HOLYTOWN

A congregation was formed here in 1843. The church was built in 1844, the manse in 1848. A cemetery was secured in 1849. A school, opened in 1861, was handed to the School Board in 1874. A new church was built in 1880, and a hall in 1893.

Membership

1848, 125;

1900, 326.

Ministers

Hugh Jaffray, 1845-1881

Robert M’Gregor, M.A., 1873 — .

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LARKHALL

Evening services were appointed at Larkhall in July 1843. There is no evidence of progress till after a visit by Home Mission deputies in 1857. A mission station was formed in 1859. The charge was sanctioned in 1860. The church was built in 1861, and the manse in 1868.

Membership

1866, 153;

1900, 245.

Minister

William Findlay, D.D., 1861 — .

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MOTHERWELL – CLASON MEMORIAL

This congregation was formed and sanctioned in 1892, and a territorial district with 6000 inhabitants assigned to it. The church, built in 1892, was enlarged in 1900. The manse was erected in 1894.

Membership

1893, 89;

1900, 364.

Minister

James Dewar, 1892 — .

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MOTHERWELL – DALZIEL

James Clason, minister of the parish, “came out” at the Disruption. The new church and manse were built in Mothcrwell, then a quiet country village. Little progress was made. When Mr. Clason retired it was reduced to a preaching station. Sanction was restored in 1854, when, owing to the opening of new industries in the district, a remarkable increase in the population began. The church buildings were greatly improved, and a suite of halls added.

Membership

1848, 89;

1900, 726.

Ministers

James Clason, 1843-1851 [Vol.1 says he died 1852.]

David Ogilvy, D.D., 1854 —

Thomas Marshall, M.A., 1896 — .

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SHOTTS

This congregation was begun as a mission station in 1846, services being held in Hall Road. The church was erected, and the charge sanctioned in 1848. The manse was built in 1858. A new church was erected in 1878. The population depended for employment on the Shotts Iron Works. The prosperity of the congregation fluctuated with that of the works.

Membership

1854, 148;

1900, 306.

Ministers

R. C. Smith, 1850-1861

R. Gilchrist, 1861 — .

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STONEHOUSE

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. A church was built, and opened in December 1843. The manse was erected in 1845, and the school and teacher’s house in 1853. In 1873 the church was demolished and a new church built, which was opened in October 1874. In 1894 about a third of the members seceded and formed a Congregational church.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 220.

Ministers

W. K. Hamilton, 1843-1887

James Laing, M.A., 1878-1893

J. H. Deas, B.D., 1894 — .

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STRATHAVEN

Alexander Rankin, minister of the quoad sacra church here, with most of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. In July following they were deprived of their church, and were accommodated for a time in the West Relief Church. The new church was opened in February 1844. The manse was built in 1847, and the school at Ballgreen in 1856. The school was transferred to the School Board in 1881. A new church replaced the old in 1884. The population of the parish decreased considerably.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 251.

Ministers

Alexander Rankin, 1843-1900

Thomas M. Dey, B.D.. 1899 — .

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UDDINGSTON

A mission was started here in 1854 by the Free Church minister of Bothwell; but this had been long in abeyance when, in 1876, the congregation was formed and sanctioned. The church was built the same year. The growth of the village as a suburb of Glasgow greatly helped the progress of the congregation.

Membership

1878, 133;

1900, 329.

Ministers

Ivy M. MacLauchlan, 1877-1885

W. M. Clow, D.D., 1886-1889

Frank Rae, M.A., 1890 — .

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WISHAW

Early in 1872, to meet the needs of a growing population, a few people hired a hall in which services were held. In March of that year the congregation was organised as a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1873. The manse was purchased in 1875, and the church erected in 1876. The town continued to grow steadily; but Wishaw was subject to violent changes in the matter of work, and a section of every congregation was nomadic.

Membership

1875, 232;

1900, 516.

Ministers

David Brunton, 1874-1894

J. J. Kelly, 1894 — .

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22. PRESBYTERY OF LANARK

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ABINGTON AND CRAWFORDJOHN

A station was formed at Crawfordjohn in 1843, and one at Abington in 1845. The services were held at Abington in a school; at Crawfordjohn in a ruinous house. A church was erected at Crawfordjohn in 1853, and one at Abington in 1861. The charge was sanctioned in 1866. The manse was built at Abington in 1869. The district served by the congregation is 20 miles in length, and sparsely populated.

Membership

1869, 110;

1900, 131.

Ministers

Robert Logan, 1866 — [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1891.]

E. T. Thomson, 1891 —

James Hamilton, M.A., 1900 — .

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CARLUKE

This congregation was formed by seven members who “came out” at the Disruption. Regular services were provided from July 1843. The charge was sanctioned in May 1844. The church was erected in 1844, and a manse some years later. A new church was built in 1864, and a new manse in 1893. The population of the district increased, but new congregations formed at Crossford and Law affected the growth of membership.

Membership

1848, 240;

1900, 491.

Ministers

John White, 1845-1861

John White (second pastorate), 1862-1893 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1892.]

D. L. Fraser, B.D., 1893-1900

Duncan Ross, B.D., 1900 — .

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CARNWATH

This congregation was organised immediately after the Disruption, when church and manse were erected.

Membership

1848, 600;

1900, 314.

Ministers

James Walker, D.D., 1843-1891

G. Gordon MacLeod, 1876-1881

A. H. Gilruth, 1881-1883

D. Harvey, 1884 — .

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COALBURN

Services were begun here in the autumn of 1893, and an iron church was erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1895. The main industry in the district was coal-mining.

Membership

1896, 167;

1900, 184.

Minister

Peter Walker, 1895 — .

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CROSSFORD

Services were begun by James Manson, a retired Free Church minister who came to reside here, and continued regularly in premises provided by him. The charge was sanctioned in 1870. The church was erected in 1874.

Membership

1872, 147;

1900, 113.

Minister

John Mathewson, 1871 — .

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DOUGLAS

Services were provided at Douglas immediately after the Disruption. The church was erected in 1845, a site having been gifted by William Greig, apothecary, Glasgow. In that year the charge was sanctioned. Subsequently a manse was built.

Membership

1848, 230;

1900, 197.

Ministers

John Jeffray, 1846-1858

J. Lamb Marr, 1859-1861

Charles Gordon, 1861 — .

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DOUGLAS WATER

This congregation, originally Reformed Presbyterian, split on the question of the Union in 1876. The majority joined the Free Church; but the minority retained the buildings, on the Lesmahagow side of Douglas Water. They ultimately joined the Established Church. A new church was built at Rigside and opened in May 1886. A manse was also erected. The congregation was composed mainly of miners.

Membership

1877, 103;

1900, 141.

Ministers

Thomas Ramage, 1876-1883

John Berry, 1884 — .

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FORTH AND WILSONTOWN

This congregation was formed as a preaching station in 1868. The charge was sanctioned in 1870, the church and manse being then in course of erection. The population was mainly mining; and the congregation reflected the fluctuations usual with this class.

Membership

1871, 200;

1900, 275.

Minister

John Bain, 1870 — .

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LANARK

The minister, Thomas Stark, and practically the entire congregation of St. Leonard’s quoad sacra, church, “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of their church in 1845. They purchased the old Associate Burgher church in Hope Street, and adapted it for their own use. Tlie manse was built in 1849. A new church and halls were erected on the old site in 1883. The manse was altered and improved in 1897.

Membership

1848, 360;

1900, 470.

Ministers

Thomas Stark, 1843-1869

D. Mackintosh, 1870 — .

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LAW

Services were begun here, under the session of Carluke Free Church, in 1878. A church was built in 1879, and the charge was sanctioned in 1883. The congregation benefited by a revival in the district soon after the church was opened. The population increased owing to the opening of coal pits, the establishment of a large railway centre, and the starting of a fruit preserving factory.

Membership

1884, 113;

1900, 131.

Minister

W. MacLellan, 1883 — .

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LEADHILLS

In 1882 many members of the local Established Church petitioned the Free Church Presbytery of Lanark to receive them into the Free Church of Scotland, urging that they were compelled “to seek recognition and shelter under a Church constitution which would respect their religious liberties.” They were received by the General Assembly in 1883 as a ministerial charge. The church was built in 1885, much labour having been given free. A manse was erected in 1889. Leadhills, on account of its altitude and isolation, was not an easy sphere of labour. There was no surplus population from which to draw new members.

Membership

1884, 248;

1900, 216.

Ministers

Robert Scobie, 1884-1886

John M’Garrity, 1887 — .

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LESMAHAGOW

At the Disruption there were two churches in Lesmahagow, and both ministers adhered to the Free Church. One was the Burgher congregation which had joined the Church of Scotland in 1839. On their minister being called away in 1843, this congregation at once transferred themselves and their property to the Reformed Presbyterian Church, but did not survive till the Union of 1876. With Dr. Parker, minister of the parish, about eight hundred members “came out.” Church, manse, and school were erected in 1844. This congregation became the mother of several new congregations in the surrounding district, parting with many of its members for the purpose.

Membership

1848, 750;

1900, 499.

Ministers

A. B. Parker, D.D., 1843-1855

James Laing, M.A., 1856-1872

J. A. Gray, 1872 — .

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23. PRESBYTERY OF DUMBARTON

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ALEXANDRIA

The congregation of the quoad sacra church here “came out” in almost unbroken strength in 1843, although the minister remained in the Establishment. They worshipped for a time in Dalmonach Hall, and then acquired an old independent church. A manse was built soon after the Disruption. A new church was erected, and opened in 1899.

Membership

1848, 299;

1900, 434.

Ministers

William Campbell, 1844-1851

William Beattie, M.A., 1851-1873

William Sutherland, B.D., 1874 — .

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ARROCHAR

This congregation was formed in 1843 of those who adhered to the Free Church in the parish. Church and manse were erected in 1844, on the road between Arrochar and Tarbet. In 1867, the roof having become dangerous, the church was taken down, and a new one built on the same site.

Membership

1848, 65;

1900, 61.

Ministers

Colin Mackenzie, M.A., 1844-1882

James Kippen, 1867-1881

J. R. Elder, 1882-1897

Alexander Prentice Telfer, M.A., 1897 — .

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BALDERNOCK

John Pollock, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were erected not far from the parish church. The town of Milngavie, about 2 miles distant, was also under the minister’s care. In 1896 a new church and hall were built in that town, and became the principal meeting-place of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 258;

1900, 265.

Ministers

John Pollock, M.A., 1843-1855

John Gillison, 1856-1872

William Young, M.A., 1873 — .

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BONHILL

In December 1844 a mission station was formed here, James Ewing of Levenside supporting the missionary. Church and manse were built in 1846, and the charge was sanctioned in 1847. The Bonhill Institute was erected in 1886 by the congregation for Sunday school and evangelistic work. The introduction and rapid growth of calico printing and turkey red dyeing industries led to a large increase in the population.

Membership

1848, 129;

1900, 414.

Ministers

Andrew Stevens, 1848-1854

D. A. Jarvis, 1855-1856

H. M. Douglas, 1857-1860

John Tully, M.A., 1861-1877

Thomas Collins, 1877 — .

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BOWLING

The village of Bowling was originally under charge of the minister of Old Kilpatrick. A church was erected, and a house bought and enlarged for a manse in 1869. The charge was sanctioned in 1878. D.D. Robertson of Old Kilpatrick became minister of the new charge, 4 elders, 1 deacon, and 81 members going with him. A hall was erected in 1893.

Membership

1878, 106;

1900, 170.

Ministers

D.D. Robertson, M.A., 1878-1885

George Macaulay, 1886-1895 [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1890 and died in 1895.]

D. Georgeson, M.A., 1890 — .

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CARDROSS

This congregation was formed in 1843 by those who “came out” at the Disruption. The minister of the parish, while favourable to the principles contended for, did not see his way to adhere to the Free Church. His great and deserved popularity diminished the number of seceders, and gave the Established Church a commanding hold on the parish. The first church was opened in June 1844. The manse was erected in 1855. Both sites were granted by Mr. Bontine of Ardoch. The feu-duty was bought up in 1891. A new church, erected in 1871, was the gift of Mr. Burns of Kilmahew. The deed of gift provided that “it shall go with that portion of the Free Church uniting with the United Presbyterian (in the event of a union), without any compensation to those members not joining the union.” The “Cardross Case” is matter of familiar history.

Membership

1848, 69;

1900, 111.

Ministers

John MacMillan, 1844-1858

A.B. Bruce, D.D., 1859-1868

Thomas Crerar, M.A., 1869-1879

R. Boog Watson, LL. D., 1879 —

A. Mitchell Hunter, M.A., 1897 — .

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CLYDEBANK – HAMILTON MEMORIAL

To meet the needs of the growing industrial population here, this congregation was formed in 1883. The foundation-stone of the new church was laid by the Hon. Mrs. Brucc, mother of Lord Balfour of Burleigh. Miss Hamilton of Barns and Cochno contributed £3000 towards the building. The church was opened in 1885; in which year the charge was sanctioned. The manse was erected in 1886, on a site given by Miss Hamilton. In recognition of her generous gifts the church was called the Hamilton Memorial Church.

Membership

1886, 206;

1900, 382.

Minister

Buchanan Blake, B.D., 1885 — .

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CLYDEBANK – WEST

The extension of Clydebank westward led to the opening of a new mission by Hamilton Memorial Church in 1896. Progress was so rapid that the charge was sanctioned in 1897. Worship was conducted at first in the public school. A hall was erected in Kilbowie Road in 1897.

Membership

1897, 98;

1900, 310.

Minister

Roderick M’Leod, 1897 — .

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DUMBARTON – HIGH

James Smith, minister of Dumbarton, “came out” in 1843, carrying with him a considerable congregation. Church and manse were built in 1843. In 1864 the old church was sold and a new one erected on another site. A new manse was built in 1863.

Membership

1848, 265;

1900, 794.

Ministers

James Smith, M.A., 1843-1862

John Tait, 1861 —

Alex. S. Inch, M.A., 1898 — .

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DUMBARTON – NORTH

This congregation was begun as a mission by the High Church. Leave to dispense sealing ordinances was granted in 1865. The charge was sanctioned in 1874. At first the congregation met in the Burgh Hall; then they purchased the church vacated in 1864 by the High congregation. A new church was erected on the old site in 1878, in which year the manse also was built.

Membership

1875, 293;

1900, 478.

Ministers

Daniel Gunn, 1875-1887

J. C. Barry, M.A., 1888 — .

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DUNTOCHER

William Alexander, minister of the parish, and the great majority of his people, “came out” in 1843. A church, with small hall and vestry, and also a manse, was forthwith erected. The hall was enlarged about 1887. About 1860 the stoppage of the mills hurt the congregation. It profited by the opening of Clydebank shipyard, and Singer’s factory in the “eighties.” Later the drift of population to Clydebank, and the influx of Roman Catholics, adversely affected it.

Membership

1870, 157;

1900, 280.

Ministers

William Alexander, 1843-1890

James Harvey, M.A., 1885-1890

J. E. Falconer, M.A., 1890 — .

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GARELOCHHEAD

The minister of Shandon held evening services here from the time of the Disruption. A preaching station was formed in 1865. The charge was sanctioned in 1873. That year the church was erected. A manse was purchased in 1874. The congregation was greatly indebted to the liberality of Edward Caird of Finnart. It was also helped by summer visitors and villa residents.

Membership

1874, 75;

1900, 129.

Ministers

David Kilpatrick, D.D., 1873-1879

W. E. Ireland, M.A., 1880 — .

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HELENSBURGH – PARK

To meet the needs of the growing population a station was formed in 1860. Progress was so rapid that the charge was sanctioned in 1861, under the name of Park Church. The new church was opened in 1863. The manse was the gift of Richard Kidston. It was afterwards enlarged.

Membership

1866, 335;

1900, 421.

Ministers

W. H. Carslaw, D.D., 1863 — [Vol.1 says 1862-1899 when he resigned.]

Henry Norwell, M.A., 1898 — .

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HELENSBURGH – WEST

This congregation, originally Old Light Burgher, joined the Church of Scotland in 1839. John Anderson, the minister, and most of his people, adhered to the Free Church in 1843, and had to pay £400 to the Church of Scotland for their buildings. A new church was built in 1853, and a new manse in 1860. In 1841 school and teacher’s house were erected. Both were enlarged later. The school was carried on till the passing of the Education Act in 1872. Then it was used for Sabbath school and church meetings. Owing to the increase of the congregation with the growing population, a new congregation, that of Park Church, was formed in 1862.

Membership

1848, 207;

1900, 532.

Ministers

John Anderson, 1843-1867

Alexander Anderson, 1863-1881 [1873-, Vol.1]

William Leitch, D.D., 1882 — .

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KILLEARN

This congregation was formed in 1845, chiefly through the efforts of John Pollock, minister of Baldernock. He was greatly helped by John Buchanan of Carbeth, who gave sites for church and manse. These were erected in 1845, session-house and hall being added later. There was also a church in Balfron, the gift of Mrs. Weir, sister of the first minister; and services were held every Sunday in Killearn and Balfron. Sir Michael Connall gifted a property to the church. His mother gave ground for a manse garden. The Disruption was not a popular movement in any of the five parishes of Strathendrick.

Membership

1848, 137;

1900, 89.

Ministers

Patrick Lumsdaine, 1845-1857

John Fiddes, 1857-1896

Hugh Sanderson, 1896 — .

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LUSS

In 1843, through the influence of Janet, Lady Colquhoun of Luss, a congregation was formed and services carried on at Arnburn. The charge was sanctioned in 1844, in which year the church at Baudry was erected. The manse was built in 1846. Church and manse were renovated in 1883. William Colquhoun of Rossdhu left £1350, the annual interest to be paid to Sustentation Fund. Daniel Stewart left £450 for maintenance of the church fabric.

Membership

1848, 113;

1900, 51.

Ministers

Neil Stewart, 1844-1890

T. E. Jubb, M.A., 1883 — .

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OLD KILPATRICK

Dr. Matthew Barclay, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. The church was built in 1844. Manse, school buildings, and stables followed. The school buildings and stables at a later time were converted into dwelling-houses and church halls. The congregation at Bowling was an offshoot from Old Kilpatrick. The commencement of Hamilton Memorial Church, Clydebank, was also due to the initiative of this congregation. The manse was built by Dr. Barclay at his own expense; and at his wife’s death, in terms of his will, it was made over to the congregation. Dr. Barclay left a sum of £1400 for support of the Free Church school. Since the passing of the Educational Endowments Act this has been administered by the Barclay Trust, in the interest of higher education in the parish.

Membership

1848, 240;

1900, 200.

Ministers

Matthew Barclay, D.D., 1843-1865

John Stewart, 1861-1866

George Macaulay, 1866-1874

D. D. Robertson, 1875-1878

R. Munro, 1878 — .

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RENTON – GAELIC

In March 1845 some 400 “Highlanders in the Vale of Leven” asked to have a Gaelic missionary to labour among them. Nothing seems to have come of this; and in 1852 the Highland Committee took up the case. In 1856 their purpose to build a church was opposed, on the ground that a new congregation in Renton was unnecessary. They were, however, allowed to proceed; and the charge was sanctioned in 1859.

Membership

1861, 25;

1900, 200.

Ministers

Alexander Cameron, LL. D., 1859-1874

James Dempster, 1875-1879

D. Colvin, 1880-1883

Alexander Miller, 1884-1891

Andrew Douglas, 1892-1900.

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RENTON – LEVENSIDE

From this congregation, formerly Old Light Burgher, certain elders, deacons, and members seceded to the Church of Scotland in 1840. The minister and the majority of the congregation united with the Reformed Presbyterian Church in 1842. The congregation joined the Free Church in 1876, taking their church and manse with them.

Membership

1877, 205;

1900, 206.

Ministers

George Davidson, B.Sc., 1876

Archibald Bell, 1877-1886

James M’Robert, M.A., 1886-1897

John Riddell, B.D., 1898 — .

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RENTON – MILLBURN

In September 1844, at the instance of Mr. Campbell of Tillichewan, a mission was begun here. Worship was conducted for a time in Murdoch’s Hall, at the north end of the village. A church, the gift of William Campbell, was erected in 1845. The manse was built a few years later. The charge was sanctioned in 1846. The turkey red and calico printing industries brought many people to the district.

Membership

1848, 135;

1900, 197.

Ministers

W. M. Dempster, 1848-1891

John Blades, 1891 — .

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ROSENEATH

On June 11, 1843, at Knockderry School, Cove, this congregation was formed by those who had seceded from the Establishment. They met on alternate Sabbaths at Knockderry and at Campsail sawmill, the interior of which had been fitted up for the purpose. The church was opened in April 1844. The manse was built in 1847. It was enlarged in 1883. The congregation owed much to the hearty support of Lorne Campbell, Chamberlain to the Duke of Argyll. After 1850, when feuing began, the population increased at Kilcreggan and Cove. The Established Church began services at Craigrownie in 1854; and a United Presbyterian Church was opened at Kilcreggan in 1862. This tended to restrict the members going over the hill to Roseneath.

Membership

1848, 126;

1900, 106.

Ministers

John Grant, 1843-1855

John M’Ewan, 1856 — [Vol.1 says 1857.]

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SHANDON

Immediately after the Disruption services were provided on the Gareloch, and a congregation formed. The church was built at Shandon in 1844, the school in 1845, and the manse in 1864. Until the erection of the charge at Garelochhead the whole district from Row to Garelochhead was under the Shandon minister. The church was enlarged and renovated in 1884. The manse was enlarged in 1900.

Membership

1848, 104;

1900, 139.

Ministers

Neil Brodie, 1844-1862

A. M. MacCallum, 1862-1874

John Brechin, M.A., 1875-1881

Hugh Miller, M.A., 1882 — .

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STRATHBLANE

After the Disruption the adherents of the Free Church here were under the charge of the minister of Baldernock. A station was formed in 1864, and the charge was sanctioned in 1870. The church was erected in 1867. It was enlarged in 1893. Half the population left the district in 1898, owing to the closing of the calico print works. The years for which the figures are given were the worst in the history of the congregation.

Membership

1871, 71;

1900, 59.

Ministers

George Renny, 1870-1871

Thomas F. Robertson, 1872-1889

Theodore Johnston, M.A., 1889 — . [His surname is Johnson in Vol.1.]

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24. PRESBYTERY OF GLASGOW

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BEARSDEN

In view of the growth of the village of Bearsden as a residential suburb of Glasgow, services were begun here in the public school in May 1887. The charge was sanctioned in 1888. The church was opened in February 1889. The manse was purchased in February 1900.

Membership

1889, 97;

1900, 190.

Ministers

George H. Knight, 1888-1895

J. Colville Peattie, M.A., 1895 — .

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BISHOPBRIGGS

In August 1843, evening services were begun in Auchinairn, a mile and a half from Bishopbriggs. A mission station was formed in 1862. The charge was sanctioned in 1865. Shortly thereafter church and manse were built in Bishopbriggs. Mining, quarrying, and agriculture were then the main local industries. Mining and quarrying were largely wrought out in course of time; but the extension of the tramway from Glasgow made the district more residential.

Membership

1869, 93;

1900, 244.

Ministers

James Fordyce, 1865-1891

William Lindsay, M.A., 1892-1895

Robert W. Reid, 1896 — .

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BUSBY

A preaching station was established in Busby in 1862. The charge was sanctioned in 1865, in which year the church was built. It was called Carmunnock Free Church, being situated in that parish. Subsequently a church was erected in the village of Carmunnock, as the centre of mission work there, to which the name was transferred, the church in Busby taking the name of that town. A house was purchased for a manse. The church was enlarged in 1874. The calico print works and agriculture were the chief local industries.

Membership

1868, 160;

1900, 231.

Ministers

Alex. Andrew, D.D., 1865-1873

George Charles, B.D., 1873-1877

A. C. Henderson, 1878 — .

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CAMPSIE

Services were provided for Campsie immediately after the Disruption. As a result of the 1859-60 revival, a regular station was formed. The meetings were held in the Commercial Inn Hall, Lennoxtown. In 1861 the church was erected, and in 1862 the charge was sanctioned. At Mr. Duke’s retiral in 1898, an ordained preacher was put in charge.

Membership

1866, 101;

1900, 147.

Ministers

William Scott, M.A., 1864-1867

D. D. MacLeod, 1867-1872

James Dewar, 1874-1879

John Duke, 1879-1898.

[George L. Wilson, settled as ordained preacher 1898 and inducted 1900 – Vol.1.]

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CATHCART

A station was begun here in 1862. A church was erected and the charge was sanctioned in 1865. Situated between Mount Florida and Cathcart, members were drawn from both of these places. With the extension of the city of Glasgow southward, the neighbouring population greatly increased.

Membership

1866, 131;

1900, 556.

Ministers

Malcolm White, M.A., 1865-1867

William Keith, 1868-1895

William Lindsay, M.A., 1895 — .

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CATHCART – NEW CATHCART

With a view to forming a new congregation in connection with the Church Extension movement, a site was obtained and a church hall erected in the town of Cathcart. By authority of the Assembly, with the approval of the Presbytery and Home Mission Committee, Thomas Pearson, minister at East Kilbride, was appointed in 1899, to gather and organise the new congregation.

Membership

1900, 129.

Minister

Thomas Pearson, M.A., 1899 — .

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CHRYSTON

At the instance of those who at the Disruption adhered to the Free Church in the parish of Cadder, a station was formed here in 1845. The church was built in 1846. The charge was sanctioned in 1848. School, teacher’s house, and manse were also erected. The congregation profited greatly by the revival of 1859-1860. In 1881 over fifty members were disjoined to form the station at Glenboig.

Membership

1848, 140;

1900, 332.

Ministers

William Burnet, 1848-1868 Vol.1 says he was translated from here in 1867.]

R. MacMorran, 1868-1870

T. Macadam. 1870-1880

Andrew Shepherd, M.A., 1881 — .

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CUMBERNAULD

Formerly Original Secession, this congregation joined the Church of Scotland in 1839. The minister and congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The church, dating from 1743, was partly rebuilt in 1825. The manse was built about 1870. The church at first supplied a wide district, in which other congregations came to be formed. Lying off the railway lines, and having no local industry, the population of Cumbernauld tended to decline.

Membership

1848, 264;

1900, 168.

Ministers

John Cochrane, 1843-1844

D. K. Macmickan, M.A., 1844-1890

Thomas Adam, M.A., 1883 — .

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GLASGOW – ANDERSTON

The minister and congregation of Anderston quoad sacra church “came out “in 1843. The building they left stood vacant till 1849, when it was burned to ashes. The congregation worshipped for a time in Catherine Street Hall, then in the Relief Church, by courtesy of Dr. Struthers. A church was built of brick and opened in February 1844. A stone building was erected in 1849. The movement of population led, in 1876-78, to the removal of the church to a new site in University Avenue. From 1851 a mission was conducted in Anderston district.

Membership

1848, 700;

1900, 889.

Ministers

A. N. Somerville, D.D., 1843-1889

J. M. Sloan, M.A., 1878-1887

Thomas Adamson, D.D., 1888 — .

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GLASGOW – ARGYLL. See GLASGOW – TRADESTON.

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GLASGOW – AUGUSTINE

Under the Session of the Wynd Church, services were begun in 1871 in a mission hall in Mathieson Street. The charge was sanctioned in 1872. A church was erected in Rutherglen Road, afterwards called “Augustine Church.” Three hundred and thirteen members of the Wynd Church, including six elders and ten deacons, joined the congregation.

Membership

1873, 515;

1900, 611.

Ministers

John Riddell, B.A., 1872-1875

J. T. Campbell Gullan, 1884 — .

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GLASGOW – BARONY

In 1866 the Wynd Church started the Townhead Mission. In 1867 it was formed into the Barony Free Church. The charge was sanctioned in 1867, when the minister and about half the congregation were transferred from the Wynd to the new charge. The church was built the same year.

Membership

1868, 385;

1900, 740.

Ministers

James Wells, D.D., 1867-1875

George Davidson, B.Sc., 1876-1881 [Vol.1 agrees with this, but entry under Glasgow – Great Hamilton Street says he was translated there in 1880.]

W. D. Glendinning, 1881-1886

D. S. M’Donald, 1887 — .

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GLASGOW – BARROWFIELD

This congregation, originally Reformed Presbyterian, joined the Free Church in 1876. It arose out of the mission in Green Street conducted by Great Hamilton Street Church, of which John G. Paton was first missionary. The surrounding population was purely industrial. The church was built in 1868.

Membership

1877, 400;

1900, 381.

Minister

John Edgar, M.A., 1863 — . [He only joined the Free Church in 1876.]

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GLASGOW – BLOCHAIRN

This congregation began as a mission of the Barony Free Church in 1863, services being held in St. Rollox School. Halls were erected in 1873. The charge was sanctioned in 1875. It was reduced to a preaching station in 1880; but sanction was restored in 1882. The church was built in 1883. The closing of Stevenson, Carlisle, & Co.’s Chemical Works and the removal of the Old Forge Ironworks adversely affected the prosperity of the district.

Membership

1883, 230;

1900, 379.

Ministers

Robt. Murdoch, 1875-1877

John Russell, B.A., 1877-1880

Wm. Forwell, 1882-1885

L. M. Weir, 1885-1888

R. W. Dobbie, 1888 — .

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GLASGOW – BRIDGEGATE

This congregation was an offshoot from the Wynd Church. The church was built in 1860, and the minister of the Wynd and several office-bearers and members were transferred to the new church. A stone pulpit outside was provided for open-air services; but its use was interdicted, on the ground that the crowd obstructed the thoroughfare.

Membership

1866, 815;

1900, 232.

Ministers

D. M’Coll, 1860-1873

Wm. Scrymgeour, 1873 — .

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GLASGOW – BRIDGETON

Alexander Wilson, minister of Bridgeton “Chapel-of-Ease,” and the majority of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of the church in February 1849. The new church was opened in December of that year. A manse was purchased in 1867. The school was erected in 1874, and transferred to the School Board of Glasgow in 1874. The church hall was built in 1880.

Membership

1848, 508 (sitters);

1900, 308.

Ministers

Alex. Wilson, 1843-1891

W. J. Thomson, 1879-1882

A. C. Mackenzie, 1882-1887

W. M. Rankin, B.D., 1888 — .

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GLASGOW – BROOMIELAW

In 1861 Free St. Peter’s built a church, in Carrick Street in connection with the mission which they had carried on for eight years. In 1862 the charge was sanctioned, and the missionary, David Farquhar, was ordained in January 1863. On Mr. Farquhar’s retiral in 1885 the charge was reduced to a mission station, the work being undertaken by the Students’ Missionary Society of the Free Church College. In 1898 they were authorised to employ an ordained preacher as their agent.

Membership

1866, 282;

1900, 277.

Minister

David Farquhar, 1863-1885. [Vol.1 says he died 1886.]

[James Law, 1898 – Vol.1]

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GLASGOW – BUCHANAN MEMORIAL

A mission church was begun in Caledonia Road in 1875. Services were held in a small iron church. Alexander C. Fullarton, Grantown, was appointed to gather and organise the congregation. The charge was sanctioned in 1876. The church was erected in 1877, and a manse was purchased in 1894. The population of the district was purely working class.

Membership

1877, 159;

1900, 641.

Ministers

Alexander C. Fullarton, 1875 —

J. W. Findlay, 1898 — .

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GLASGOW – CAMLACHIE. See GLASGOW – WHITEVALE.

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GLASGOW – CANDLISH MEMORIAL

This congregation arose from the mission station begun in Govanhill by Augustine congregation in 1873. The charge was sanctioned in 1874, church and hall being at once erected. The population of the district was mainly working class.

Membership

1875, 194;

1900, 637.

Ministers

James Stuart, 1874 —

George Williams, M.A., 1900 — .

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GLASGOW – CHALMERS’

This congregation was formed as the result of Home Mission work conducted by Union Free Church. Services were held for a time in Chapel Close School. The charge was sanctioned in 1859. In that year a church was built in Govan Street. In 1869 this church was sold, and an old Reformed Presbyterian Church in Salisbury Street was purchased. Three galleries were introduced soon afterwards. This building was purchased by the Glasgow and South-Westem Railway Company, and a new church was erected, with halls, etc., at the corner of Cavendish Street and Pollokshaws Road, in 1898.

Membership

1861, 265;

1900, 740.

Ministers

Donald M’Kinnon, 1859-1892

John Urquhart, 1892-1900 [Vol.1 says he was translated in 1899.]

D. L. Fraser, B.D., 1900 — .

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GLASGOW – COLLEGE

College congregation was formed by Dr. Robert Buchanan, with a number of office-bearers and members from the Free Tron in 1856-57. The church was erected on a site gifted by Dr. Clark of Wester Moffat, and opened in November 1857. The charge was sanctioned that year. The manse was built in 1882, also a church officer’s house.

Membership

1858, 330;

1900, 370.

Ministers

R. Buchanan, D.D., 1857-1875

George Reith, D.D., 1866 — .

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GLASGOW – COWCADDENS

This congregation was started as a mission by the Free Tron Church in 1862. It was recognised as a preaching station in 1863. The charge was sanctioned in 1867. The congregation met at first in a rented hall. The church was erected in 1872-73. The members were drawn almost entirely from the working class.

Membership

1868, 223;

1900, 1150.

Ministers

Gabriel Kerr, 1867-1882

William Ross, 1883 —

James Muir, B.D., 1896-1899.

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GLASGOW – CRANSTONHILL

This congregation arose from the mission conducted in Cranstonhill by Free St. Matthew’s Church. The congregation met at first in a hall. The charge was sanctioned in 1876. A church was afterwards erected.

Membership

1877, 116;

1900, 298.

Minister

Alexander Linn, 1877 — .

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GLASGOW – CUNINGHAME

This congregation took its rise from a mission started by Trinity Free Church. It was recognised as a preaching station in 1871. The charge was sanctioned in 1873. The church in Govan Street vacated by Chalmers’ congregation was purchased in 1869. Towards the purchase £1000 was given by Mr. Cuninghame (of Messrs. Merry & Cuninghame), whose name it bears. Halls were erected in 1871, and the church was enlarged in 1873. In 1898 the buildings were sold to the Glasgow and South-Western Railway Company, and new church and halls were erected. There was a great influx of Roman Catholic and Jewish residents into the district in the closing years of the century.

Membership

1874, 171;

1900, 838.

Ministers

Alex. Andrew, DD., 1873-1884

Alex. Simpson, B.Sc., 1885 — .

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GLASGOW – DENNISTOUN

Wellpark Free Church started a mission in East Millar Street in 1859. Services were held first in a school, and then in a wooden erection. The charge was sanctioned in 1868. A church was built in Armadale Street in 1874, and was called Dennistoun Free Church.

Membership

1869, 314;

1900, 775.

Ministers

G. Stewart, 1868-1872

John Stewart, D.D., 1873 —

James Barr, B.D., 1896 — .

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GLASGOW – DUKE STREET GAELIC

The members of this congregation who adhered to the Free Church in 1843 worshipped along with Free St. Andrew’s in Bridgegate quoad sacra church. When St. Andrew’s congregation moved to a church of their own, the Gaelic was continued as a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. They were deprived of the church in 1849, and the new church in Main Street was erected.

Membership

1848, 158;

1900, 151.

Ministers

John Noble, M.A., 1846-1849

George G. MacLeod, 1854-1867 [Vol.1 says he resigned 1868.]

Evan Gordon, 1869 —

John MacLeod, 1894 — .

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GLASGOW – EAST CAMPBELL STREET

The minister, Session, and part of the congregation of East Campbell Old Light Church joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, and formed what was called Stockwell Parish Church. The remainder of the congregation joined the Free Church in 1852, bringing their property with them. They were known as East Campbell Street Free Church.

Membership

1854, 424;

1900, 287.

Ministers

J. D. Paxton, 1852-1858

W. Rossburgh, 1852-1892 [Vol.1 gives his surname as Rossborough and says he was settled here in 1858.]

David Brown, 1882-1886

John Russell, B.A., 1886 —

John Magowan, 1897 — .

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GLASGOW – EAST GORBALS See GLASGOW – VICTORIA.

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GLASGOW – EAST PARK

Mission work was carried on here from 1873 by Maryhill congregation. When sanction was granted in 1877, there was no congregation; but a few friends guaranteed the necessary contribution to the Sustentation Fund, and a minister was settled, who gathered the people. They worshipped for a time in rented premises. The church hall was erected in 1878, and the church in 1885. The congregation grew with the growth of the population.

Membership

1878, 55;

1900, 592.

Minister

John White, M.A., 1877 — .

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GLASGOW – FAIRBAIRN

Responding to an application from Glasgow Presbytery, the Assembly, in 1875, sanctioned the erection of a new charge in the eastern part of Bridgeton. Work was begun, under the care of Trinity Free Church Session, in a public hall. The new church was opened in May 1876. In the large industrial population the growth of the congregation was rapid.

Membership

1876, 145;

1900, 1035.

Minister

Gilbert Laurie, B.A., 1875 — .

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GLASGOW – FINNIESTON

This congregation was founded by Free St. Matthew’s in 1856, and several of the St. Matthew’s elders acted as a provisional Session. The charge was sanctioned that year; and in December following the church was opened. A new church was erected in 1878.

Membership

1858, 250;

1900, 1133.

Ministers

A. A. Bonar, D.D., 1858-1892 [Under Collace and in Vol.1, it says he was translated here in 1856.]

D. M. M’Intyre, 1891 — .

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GLASGOW – GORBALS

A majority of Gorbals Kirk Session “came out” in 1843, and formed the Session of the new Free Church. The congregation met at first in the Baronial Hall, Main Street. The church was built in 1844. In 1891 the congregation, grown too large for the church, worshipped in the National Halls, Main Street. The church was then sold; but difficulties following Mr. Robertson’s resignation delayed building till 1898, when the new church and halls in South Portland Street were erected. A manse was acquired in Maxwell Drive, Pollokshields. The work was increasingly difficult owing to the growing numbers of Roman Catholics and Jews in the district.

Membership

1848, 380;

1900, 750.

Ministers

Robert Bremner, M.A., 1843-1895

John Robertson, 1891-1894

D. C. Macnicol, B.D., 1895 — .

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GLASGOW – GREAT HAMILTON STREET

This congregation, formerly Reformed Presbyterian, joined the Free Church in 1876. Their church was erected in 1819. Their mission premises in Green Street gave place in 1883 to a new suite of buildings. The manse was purchased in 1878. Offshoots from this congregation were those of Barrowfield, Renwick, and Grant Street.

Membership

1877, 553;

1900, 403.

Ministers

William Symington, D.D., 1876-1879

S. R. Macphail, D.D., 1879-1880 [Vol.1 and entry under Elgin – High, say he was translated here in 1878.]

George Davidson, B.Sc., 1880-1883 [Vol.1 and entry under Glasgow – Barony, says he was translated here in 1881.]

James Gage, B.D., 1884-1892 [In Vol.1 his surname is given as Gagge.]

David Eaton, D.D., 1893 — .

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GLASGOW – HOPE STREET

The minister and entire congregation of this Gaelic quoad sacra church “came out” in 1843. There was a heavy debt on the church. The congregation bought it from the creditors. This church was afterwards sold, and the congregation purchased what was known as Ewing Place Church in Waterloo Street.

Membership

1848, 360;

1900, 358.

Ministers

W. M’Gilvray, D.D., 1843-1847

R. M’Gillivray, 1848-1853

Duncan MacGregor, M.A., 1854-1864

Alexander Urquhart, 1865- 1886

J. D. M’Culloch, 1889 — .

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GLASGOW – HUTCHESONTOWN

The minister and congregation of Hutchesontown quoad sacra church “came out” at the Disruption. They were deprived of their buildings by interdict, at the instance of the Established Church; and forthwith erected a new church in Eglinton Street. This church was bought by the Caledonian Railway Company in 1887. The congregation removed to Crosshill, where a new church was opened in 1893.

Membership

1848, 600;

1900, 993.

Ministers

A. S. Patterson, D.D., 1843-1885

Andrew Ryrie, 1876 — .

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GLASGOW – JOHN KNOX

The minister and congregation of this Church Extension charge adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The feu right, or title, was so framed that the congregation were able to retain the property. A large influx of Roman Catholics and Jews in later years affected adversely the prosperity of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 500;

1900, 425.

Ministers

J. R. Anderson, 1843-1852

A. Bannatyne, 1853-1863 [Vol.1 says he removed to Ayr 1860.]

R. C. Smith, 1861 —

John Buchan, 1888 — .

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GLASGOW – KELVINSIDE

A mission was promoted in this district by the Kirk Session of Free St. George’s, at whose request the right to dispense sealing ordinances was granted in 1854. Anticipating the needs of the growing population, certain prominent Free Churchmen proposed to build a church. A wooden church was erected, and opened in November 1859. The charge was sanctioned in 1860. Church, halls, and offices were built in 1862-63. With the growth of the population the congregation increased in prosperity and influence.

Membership

1866, 356;

1900, 942.

Ministers

William Traill, 1862-1867

W. Ross Taylor, D.D., 1868 — .

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GLASGOW – KINGSTON

The minister and congregation of Kingston Church Extension charge “came out” at the Disruption. The congregation found itself in difficulties, and in 1862 there was question as to the expediency of settling another minister. The charge was finally suppressed by the Assembly in 1884.

Membership

1848, 110; 1884, 164.

Ministers

James Gibson, 1843-1856

Alexander Brown, 1856-1860

Joseph Logan, 1862-1866

Robert Gault, 1866-1884.

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GLASGOW – KINNING PARK

Responding to a petition from Free Church residents in this district, services were begun in Parkholm Hall, in 1862, on the footing of a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned that year. In 1863 the church was erected. The tower was added in 1881. The movement of better-to-do people towards the suburbs adversely affected the prosperity of the congregation.

Membership

1866, 460;

1900, 720.

Ministers

A. B. Birkmyre, 1863-1880

Archibald Russell, M.A, 1880 — .

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GLASGOW – LANGSIDE

This congregation was established as a preaching station, in 1882, to meet the needs of Free Church members in this growing district. Services were held at first in Langside Academy. A brick church was opened in 1883. The charge was sanctioned in 1884. A new church was erected, and opened in 1896.

Membership

1885, 266;

1900, 913.

Ministers

J. A. Gardiner, B.A., 1884-1890

D. F. Mackenzie, B.D., 1891 — .

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GLASGOW – LONDON ROAD

A mission was inaugurated by the Presbytery, east of Bridgeton Cross, in 1870, Peter M’Lachlan of Jordanhill being put in charge. The charge was sanctioned in 1874, and steps were taken for the building of a church. When Mr. M’Lachlan seceded to the Established Church in 1876, he had so arranged matters beforehand that the buildings then in course of erection were transferred to that church. For those who remained in the Free Church a hall was engaged in which for a time they worshipped. The congregation prospered greatly, and in 1878 church, halls, etc., were erected. The district latterly somewhat deteriorated in character through movement of the population, and closing of important factories.

Membership

1875, 165;

1900, 542.

Ministers

Peter M’Lachlan, 1874-1876

Hugh M’Intosh, M.A., 1877-1881

David Lowe, 1881 —

David B. Muir, M.A., 1900.

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GLASGOW – LYON STREET

A mission was long conducted in this district by St George’s Kirk Session. In 1852 it was put on the footing of a preaching station. A church was erected in 1859. The charge was sanctioned in 1870. In 1876 the minister and some 234 members were transferred to North Woodside to form the new congregation there.

Membership

1866, 560;

1900, 633.

Ministers

D. R. Kilpatrick, 1860-1876

James Philip, 1876-1881

T. S. Anderson, 1881-1885

David Brown, 1886-1890

John Telfer, 1891-1895

J. W. Jackson, 1896 — .

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GLASGOW – MACDONALD

With the sanction of the Presbytery, the Kirk Session of Hope Street Church began a Gaelic mission in the Cowcaddens and Port Dundas district in 1860. A church, named “Macdonald Church,” was erected in 1861. The charge was sanctioned in 1863.

Membership

1866, 118;

1900, 130.

Ministers

John Gordon, 1864-1868

John Logan, 1869-1871

Angus M’Iver, 1872-1875

Alexander Murchison, 1876 — .

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GLASGOW – MAITLAND See GLASGOW – ROSE STREET.

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GLASGOW – MARTYRS’

The minister and congregation of Martyrs’ quoad sacra parish “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of the church in 1849. During the six years—1843-1849—they paid a rent of £30 per annum to the Church Building Society, for use of the church. Ejected on a week’s notice, they worshipped with Free St. Andrew’s until 1850, when their new church was opened. A gallery was added in 1879. Halls, etc., were erected in 1899.

Membership

1848, 118;

1900, 571.

Ministers

David Menzies, 1843-1877

Robert Thornton, M.A., 1877-1881

L. MacLauchlan, 1882-1895

A. G. Oliver, M.A., 1896 — .

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GLASGOW – MARYHILL

The minister and the bulk of the congregation of Maryhill “Chapel-of-Ease” “came out” at the Disruption. They were deprived of their church in 1847. For a time they worshipped in David Swan’s sawmill. The church was built in 1848-49, on a site gifted by Sir Archibald Islay Campbell, Bart., of Succoth. School and teacher’s house were erected in 1848, and the manse in 1849. Spire and bell were added to the church in 1859. East Park Church was the outcome of mission work conducted by this congregation.

Membership

1848, 288;

1900, 523.

Ministers

R. M. Wilson, 1843-1874

John Girvan, 1875-1899 [Vol.1 says he became minister emeritus in 1899.]

Andrew Gillison, M.A., 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – MILLERSTON

In response to an application from adherents of the Free Church residing in the landward part of the Barony parish, a mission station was opened in 1846. In 1856 it became a preaching station, and that year the church was erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1859. The manse was built in 1862; the hall and session house in 1881. Glasgow did not extend in the direction of Millerston, which is only 4 miles from the Royal Exchange. The boys in Mossbank Industrial School worshipped in the church. Mission work and Sunday schools were carried on at Provan Mill and Garthamloch.

Membership

1860, 90;

1900, 195.

Ministers

J. L. Walker, M.A., 1859-1863

Alexander Thomson, 1863-1892

J. F. Miller, M.A., 1893 — .

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GLASGOW – MILTON

The minister and congregation of this Church Extension charge “came out” in 1843. This congregation did not enter the Union in 1900, and the information available is meagre.

Membership

1848, 287;

1900, 122.

Ministers

Hugh Mackay, 1843-1844

Hugh Macdougall, 1845-1884

John Geddes, 1885 — .

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GLASGOW – NORTH WOODSIDE

In 1875 the Presbytery, assisted by the Glasgow Free Church Building Society, took steps to meet the needs of the growing population in North Woodside district. With the consent of the General Assembly in 1876, the minister and 234 members of Lyon Street were transferred to form the nucleus of a new congregation here. Church and halls were erected, the upper hall being added later. The congregation grew with the growth of the population—chiefly respectable working class.

Membership

1876, 258;

1900, 875.

Ministers

D. R. Kilpatrick, 1876 — [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1891.]

James Weatherhead, B.D., 1891 — .

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GLASGOW – PAISLEY ROAD

To provide for the needs of a great aIt is nd growing population in this district, the directors of the Glasgow Free Church Building Society, in 1874, erected a hall, in which services were held, under the supervision of the Wynd Church, of which this congregation was really an offshoot. The charge was sanctioned in 1874. The church (with halls) was the first Free Church erected west of Paisley Road Toll.

Membership

1876, 96;

1900, 788.

Ministers

John Riddell, B.A., 1875-1887

P. A. G. Clark, 1887-1893

John Hall, 1894-1899

W. S. Swanson, M.A., 1900 —

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GLASGOW – PLANTATION See GLASGOW – WHITE MEMORIAL

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GLASGOW – POLLOKSHIELDS

This congregation was formed by Free Church residents in 1875. The charge was sanctioned in 1876. Provision was thus made for the needs of the suburb which had just begun to grow. The congregation worshipped at first in an iron church; the first building in the field where it stood. The church was built in 1877-78. A mission was conducted in West Scotland Street, the outcome of which was the congregation there.

Membership

1879, 44;

1900, 885.

Minister

James Wells, D.D., 1875 — .

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GLASGOW – POSSILPARK

This congregation arose from a mission conducted in the district by Renfield Free Church. Regular service was begun in 1878, under Professor Henry Drummond. The church was erected in 1880-81. The charge was sanctioned in 1881.

Membership

1882, 196;

1900, 472.

Minister

W. M’Killiam, M.A., 1882 — .

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GLASGOW – QUEEN’S CROSS

This congregation originated in the Springbank Mission of St. Matthew’s Church. It was part of a Presbyterial scheme for planting twelve churches in new districts of the city. The charge was sanctioned in 1897. The church and hall, built by Free St. Matthew’s Church, were opened in September 1899. Two similar (extension) churches were opened in the same district within a few years.

Membership

1900, 394.

Minister

George Sinclair, 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – QUEEN’S PARK

Services were begun for this district in a small hall in 1866. The charge was sanctioned in 1867. About 1868 a temporary brick church was erected. The permanent church was built in 1874, and the halls in 1878-79. The old brick church was sold in 1882 for removal to Langside.

Membership

1868, 93;

1900, 743.

Ministers

Wm. Scott, M.A., 1867 —

James Henderson, M.A., 1894-1898

J. L. Craig, M.A., 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – RENFIELD

This was formerly the East Campbell Street Old Light congregation. Crowded out of the church there they worshipped first in the hall of the grammar school, George Street, then in Dr. Wardlaw’s old chapel, 17 North Albion Street, until, in 1823, their new church was ready, at the north-west corner of Renfield and Gordon Streets. They joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, taking their property with them. The minister and congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843, again carrying their property with them. The church site was sold in 1853. A new church was erected, and opened in 1858, at the corner of Bath Street and Elmbank Street.

Membership

1848, 713;

1900, 506.

Ministers

Michael Willis, 1856-1863 [These dates are for the third minister, see below. This minister was here from 1843 till 1847 at the latest. See Vol.1.]

John Bonar, D.D., 1848-1854

Duncan M’Nab, 1856-1863

Marcus Dods, D.D., 1864-1889

W. M. Macgregor, D.D., 1890-1898

P. Carnegie Simpson, D.D., 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – RENWICK

This congregation sprang out of fellowship meetings on the south side of the Clyde belonging to Great Hamilton Street Reformed Presbyterian Church. It was known as the Southern Reformed Presbyterian Congregation. Their first church was in Salisbury Street. This was sold in 1868 to the City Union Railway, and a new church and manse were erected in Cumberland Street. Renwick joined the Free Church in 1876. The congregation was noted for its religious and philanthropic activities, especially in adult mission work, Sunday schools, and Bible classes.

Membership

1877, 305;

1900, 484.

Ministers

John M’Dermid, 1876-1882

J. Fairley Daly, B.D., 1882 — .

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GLASGOW – ROSE STREET

The church bearing this name was built in 1862, under the bequest of Miss Maitland, for a mission promoted by East Gorbals F’ree Church (GLASGOW – VICTORIA, which see), and was called the Maitland Free Church. The charge was sanctioned in 1862. In 1873 James M’Naught, the minister, and members sold the church, moved to a new building erected in Devon Street, and joined the Established Church. The church was purchased by Ralph C. Smith, of John Knox’s Church, and presented to the Free Church, for the use of a new congregation to be known as Rose Street. This charge was sanctioned in 1875. The character of the district seriously deteriorated. There was a great influx of Roman Catholics and Jews.

Membership

1866, 406;

1900, 834.

Ministers

James M’Naught, D.D., 1862-1876

William Tullo, 1874-1883

David Forsyth, 1884-1898

William Ewing, D.D., 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. ANDREWS

Dr. Nathaniel Paterson, minister of St Andrew’s parish, and nearly all his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped in the hall of the Black Bull Inn, Trongate, until March 1844, when the new church in Hanover Square was opened. In 1891 St. Andrew’s congregation united with St Paul’s. St. Andrew’s buildings were sold, and the proceeds applied to found a new charge at Alexandria Park, to which the name of St. Andrew’s was transferred. Church and halls were erected there, and James Muir, of Cowcaddens Church, was inducted in 1899, to gather and organise the new congregation.

Membership

1848, 410 (the old congregation);

1900, 162 (the new congregation).

Ministers

Nathaniel Paterson, D.D., 1843-1871

John Isdale, 1856-1891

James Muir, B.D., 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. DAVID’S

Dr. Lorimer, minister of St. David’s (or Ramshorn Church), and his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They met at first in the Assembly Halls in Ingram Street. The church in Frederick Street was built in 1844. In 1864 the congregation bought the church at the top of West Regent Street, vacated by Free St. George’s. Tunnelling operations had injured the building, and it was taken over by the Railway Company concerned in 1884. A temporary church was erected near St George’s Cross in 1885. A hall was built, and the new church was opened in 1892.

Membership

1848, 330;

1900, 340.

Ministers

J. G. Lorimer, D.D., 1843-1868

R. R. Thom, 1869-1876

John Burnett, B.D., 1878 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. ENOCH’S

Dr. James Henderson, minister of St. Enoch’s, and many of his people, “came out” in 1843. They built a church forthwith in Waterloo Street. The church in Dumbarton Road, at Overnewton, was erected in 1873. For some time it was known as the Melville Church.

Membership

1848, 385;

1900, 750.

Ministers

James Henderson, D.D., 1843-1874

James Nicoll, M.A., 1864-1868

A. Melville, D.D., 1869-1889

William Muir, B.D., 1890-1894

E. D. Fingland, M.A., 1895 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. GEORGE’S

Dr. John Smyth, minister of St. George’s parish, and his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Their church was built in Bath Street. In 1864 a new church was built farther west, the old church being sold to St. David’s. Mission work was conducted on the north side of the city.

Membership

1848, 500;

1900, 560.

Ministers

J. Smyth, D.D., 1843-1860

James Freer, 1862-1873

G. W. Thomson, D.D., 1874-1881

R. S. Duff, D.D., 1883 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. GEORGE’S ROAD

This congregation, formerly Reformed Presbyterian, joined the Free Church in 1876. The church in Grant Street was erected about 1860.

Membership

1877, 307;

1900, 812.

Minister

John Torrance, 1861 — [Only in the Free Church from 1876.]

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GLASGOW – ST. JAMES’

This congregation was formed mainly of office-bearers and members who left St. James’ parish, Greenhead quoad sacra, and Mid Calton quoad sacra churches at the Disruption. They met for worship, first in the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Great Hamilton Street, and then in Chalmers’ Church till May 1845, when their church in London Street was opened. A hall and other premises were added in 1876. The exodus of the population from the central district of the city adversely affected the congregation.

Membership

1848, 592;

1900, 395.

Ministers

David Brown, D.D., 1843-1857

James Johnston, F.S.A., 1858 — [Vol.1 says he retired to London in 1877.]

Hector Hall, D.D., 1877-1887

F. H. Georgeson, M.A., 1888 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. JOHN’S

Dr. Thomas Brown, minister of St. John’s parish, and many of his people, “came out” in 1843. Their new church was opened in June 1845. The church hall was built in 1874. This congregation also had to contend with losses caused by migration of members to the suburbs.

Membership

1848, 800;

1900, 516.

Ministers

Thos. Brown, D.D., 1843-1847

John Roxburgh, D.D., 1847-1880

Alex. Whyte, D.D., LL. D., 1866-1870

J. S. Carroll, D.D., 1883 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. LUKE’S

The congregation of St. Luke’s quoad sacra church adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. They were deprived of their church in 1848. In 1849 the new church was erected. The character of the district changed greatly, people of means moving towards the suburbs. This affected the character of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 325;

1900, 573.

Ministers

D. Mitchell, 1843-1882

J. F. MacGregor, 1867 — [Vol.1 says he resigned 1884.]

Robert Hill, M.A., 1884-1891

C. R. Ramsay, M.A., 1891 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. MARK’S

St. Mark’s, a Church Extension charge, was vacant at the Disruption. The congregation united with that of Brownfield quoad sacra church, the minister of which remained in the Establishment. The united congregation worshipped in St. Mark’s Church, as a congregation of the Free Church, until, in 1848, they were deprived of the building. In 1848 the new church in Anderston was erected.

Membership

1848, 731;

1900, 548.

Ministers

W. Scott, 1843-1845

R. Ross, 1846-1847

W. M’Gilvray. D.D., 1848-1854

H. S. Paterson. M.D., D.D., 1854-1872

C. G. M’Crie, D.D., 1873-1877

W. H. Gualter, 1877-1884

George Milne, 1885 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. MATTHEW’S

In September 1843 those who adhered to the Free Church in St. Matthew’s parish were formed into a congregation. Their first church, afterwards known as West Church, was built in 1844. In 1850 a new church was erected in Bath Street. Cranstonhill and Queen’s Cross congregations both arose from missions conducted by St. Matthew’s. In 1886 mission premises erected in Doncaster Street became the centre of their mission work at Springbank.

Membership

1848, 750;

1900, 1128.

Ministers

Samuel Miller, D.D., 1844-1881

John Watson, D.D., 1877-1880

C. A. Salmond, D.D., 1881-1887

James Stalker, D.D., 1887 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. PAUL’S

Dr. Forbes, minister of St. Paul’s Church, and most of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Anticipating the Disruption, certain leading members of St. Paul’s formed “The Free Presbyterian Church Association,” which secured a site, and arranged for the building of the new church, at the corner of Frederick Street and Cathedral Street. In 1891 St. Andrew’s congregation united with that of St. Paul’s, retaining the name of the latter for the united congregation—see GLASGOW – ST. ANDREWS—and worshipping in St. Paul’s Church. As in other central city charges, the work became more difficult and anxious, owing to change of population.

Membership

1848, 530;

1900, 800.

Ministers

J. Forbes, D.D., LL. D., 1843-1874

W. Jeffrey, M.D., 1875-1889

John Martin, 1891-1895

Donald Cameron, M.A., 1895 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. PETER’S

William Arnot, minister of St. Peter’s, and his congregation, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. The church belonged to the Church Building Society. They continued to worship in it, paying a rent of £100 per annum, till 1847. Then they worshipped, in winter in the City Hall and in summer in Albion Chapel, till their new church was opened in 1850.

Membership

1848, 965 (sitters);

1900, 576.

Ministers

William Arnot, 1843-1863

Hugh Macmillan, LL. D., 1864-1878

James Brown, M.A., 1880 — .

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GLASGOW – ST. STEPHEN’S

Dr. King, the minister of this Extension Charge, and his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to worship in their church until deprived of it in 1848. The church in New City Road was opened in 1850. Halls were built in 1872. At first this was a West End congregation, but the growth of the city made it a central charge.

Membership

1848, 500;

1900, 719.

Ministers

Andrew King, D.D., 1843-1848

Robert Cowe, M.A., 1849-1867

James Nicoll, M.A., 1868-1887

Hugh Ross, 1888-1900.

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GLASGOW – SHAWLANDS

In 1898 a hall was built at Shawlands Cross, on a site secured for a church, and David Forsyth, of Rose Street, was transferred to Shawlands, to gather and organise a new congregation. In the midst of a large and growing population, the congregation rapidly increased.

Membership

1899, 154;

1900, 406.

Minister

David Forsyth, 1898 — —.

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GLASGOW – SHERBROOKE

This congregation, sanctioned in 1894, was promoted by a local committee, in the interests of the growing suburban district of Pollokshields and Bellahouston. A suitable site was secured for a church. A hall was erected there, and opened in December 1894.

Membership

1895, 146;

1900, 279.

Minister

S. G. MacLennan, M.A., 1895 — .

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GLASGOW – SIGHTHILL

In 1869 a mission was started in Sighthill by the Tron Free Church. Services were held at first in a hall belonging to the Caledonian Railway Company. In 1870 a church hall was built. In 1871 the charge was sanctioned, and in 1872 the church was erected. The manse was built in 1885. The population is entirely working class.

Membership

1872, 180;

1900, 953.

Minister

George Hanson, M.A., 1872 — .

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GLASGOW – SOMERVILLE MEMORIAL

In 1874 a mission was begun in the suburban district of Keppochhill. It was in charge of the West Church. The people met at first in a hall, and afterwards in an iron church. The charge was sanctioned in 1888. The new church was opened in 1895, and called the Somerville Memorial Church.

Membership

1889, 168;

1900, 368.

Minister

Thos. Havre, 1889 — .

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GLASGOW – SPRINGBURN

This congregation, designed to supply the needs of a population growing rapidly to the north of Sighthill, was started by the Presbytery and Home Mission Committee, and the charge was sanctioned in 1888. The congregation met at first in a temporary iron structure. Church, two halls, vestry, and church officer’s dwelling were erected in 1890. The population is entirely working class, and the congregation was affected by fluctuations of trade, especially the locomotive trade, and railway works.

Membership

1889, 131;

1900, 768.

Ministers

Alex. Soutar. M.A., 1888-1898

B. J. Davidson, B.D., 1899 — .

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GLASGOW – STEVENSON MEMORIAL

The nucleus of this congregation was a mission long carried on by College Church in North Woodside Road. The church was built under the session of College Church. James Stevenson of Hailie contributed handsomely to the cost, and the church was named for his father, Nathaniel Stevenson, a former elder in College Church. The charge was sanctioned in 1897, but no minister was settled till after 1900.

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GLASGOW – STOCKWELL

A portion of East Campbell Street Old Light congregation joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, and famed Stockwell Church. They “came out” in 1843, and formed Stockwell Free Church, carrying their buildings with them. Owing to changes of population the church was sold in 1886, and the congregation moved to a new church in Albert Road, Pollokshields.

Membership

680; 1870, 810.

Ministers

Peter Currie, 1843-1859

J. S. Alexander, 1859-1863

George Macaulay, 1863-1866

Alex. Munro, 1867-1869

John MacGregor, M.A., 1869 — .

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GLASGOW – TOLLCROSS

The Presbytery, with the assistance of the Home Mission Committee, opened a mission here in 1858. The church was erected in 1867. The charge was sanctioned in 1869. The manse was built in 1875. Increased railway facilities and a through car service to the city led to growth of the population.

Membership

1870, 108;

1900, 434.

Ministers

James Drysdale, 1871-1892

John Leighton, 1892 — .

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GLASGOW – TRADESTON

This charge was first known as the Gaelic congregation meeting in Kirkfield Church. It was actually formed before the Disruption. A new church was built in Oswald Street in 1847, and called Argyll Church. In 1893 the old Gorbals Church in Commerce Street was bought, and the name of Tradeston Gaelic Church was taken. Some members were lost through the removals, others through the Declaratory Act, and more in prospect of the Union in 1900. The change in the character of the population also adversely affected the congregation.

Membership

1848, 480;

1900, 270.

Ministers

Archibald M’Dougall, 1843-1883

G. L. Campbell, 1875-1884

William Fraser, M.A.. 1884 — .

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GLASGOW – TRINITY

This congregation was an offshoot from the Wynd Church. The church, begun in 1862, was erected in Charlotte Street. The Assembly, in 1864, sanctioned the charge; and the minister and 400 members of the Wynd Church were transferred to the new church. Cuninghame Church took its origin in a mission conducted by Trinity congregation. In common with other central churches, Trinity suffered from changes in the population.

Membership

1866, 895;

1900, 887.

Ministers

Robert Howie, D.D., 1864-1872

Andrew Keay, M.A., 1872-1878

George Stewart, 1879-1884

J. J. Mackay, M.A., 1884-1894

N. Macpherson, 1895 — .

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GLASGOW – TRON

The congregation of the Tron Church “came out” at the Disruption. They worshipped in the City Hall until their church was opened in 1844. It was from a mission conducted by the Free Tron Church that the Wynd Church arose. In 1857 the minister and part of the congregation were transferred, to form the College Church. The Free Tron shared the experience common to central charges.

Membership

1848, 700;

1900, 611.

Ministers

Robert Buchanan, D.D., 1843-1857

William Traill, 1858-1862

W. C. Smith, D.D., LL. D., 1862-1876

William Leitch, D.D., 1876-1882

John Tainsh, 1883 — .

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GLASGOW – UNION (known as LAURIESTON till 1851)

The minister and congregation of Laurieston quoad sacra church adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to use the church, which had been erected by the Glasgow Church Building Society, until they were deprived of it in 1849. Services were then held in a railway store-room. The new church was built in 1850-51, and called Union Church. Mission work conducted by Union Church in the Gorbals was the beginning of Chalmers’ Free Church. The character of the district changed, greatly to the detriment of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 700;

1900, 499.

Ministers

James Macbeth, 1843-1850

George Philip, D.D., 1851-1866

Richard Waterston, B.A., 1867-1878

Alex. Skene, M.A., 1879-1890

M. D. MacGiIvray, M.A., 1891-1898 [In Vol.1 his surname is MacGilivray.]

G. M. Philps, B.D., 1898 — .

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GLASGOW – VICTORIA

With a view to the forming of a congregation to meet the wants of the Gorbals district, the Glasgow Free Church Building Society leased the old parish church of Gorbals, then standing empty, in 1852. The congregation was formed in 1853, by the Presbytery, acting along with the Home Mission Committee. It was known at first as East Gorbals Free Church. The building, exposed for sale owing to arrears of feu-duty, was bought by certain leading Free Churchmen, and presented to the Home Mission Committee. It was reacquired by the Established Church in 1863. The congregation then worshipped in John Knox Church until the new building at Eglinton Toll was opened in October 1864, when the name, Victoria Church, was adopted. The congregation suffered by the removal, and also by the opening of other Free churches in the district.

Membership

1855, 750;

1900, 555.

Ministers

Alex. Cumming, 1853-1874

James Cameron, M.A., 1874 — .

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GLASGOW – WELLPARK

The minister and congregation of this quoad sacra church adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to use the church until deprived of it in 1848. Mr. Tennent of Wellpark then generously gave a site and erected a church for the congregation. Manse and halls were added later.

Membership

1848, 140;

1900, 940.

Ministers

James Mackinlay, 1843-1849

A. B. Parker, D.D., 1855-1867

John Adam, D.D., 1867-1874 . [Under Aberdeen – South, says he was translated 1868.]

R. M. Thornton, D.D., 1874-1883

Hugh Mair, 1884 — .

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GLASGOW – WEST

This church was built by Free St. Matthew’s in 1844. In 1850 they moved to their new church in Bath Street. That building was rapidly filled, and in November 1851 this church was reopened, in order to form a new congregation. The charge was sanctioned in 1854.

Membership

1859, 440;

1900, 227.

Ministers

James Adam, 1854-1860

Lewis Ferguson, 1861-1871

James Laing, M.A., 1872-1874

John Hamilton, 1874-1878

John F. Ewing, M.A., 1879-1886

John Scott, M.A., 1887 — .

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GLASGOW – WESTBOURNE

To meet the needs of the growing population in the Kelvinside district, the Free Church Building Society, in 1875, erected an iron church on Great Western Road. Here a new congregation was formed under the name of Western Road Free Church. The charge was sanctioned in 1876 as Westbourne Church. The church was built in 1881, and a manse was purchased in 1900.

Membership

1877, 77;

1900, 383.

Ministers

A. Orrock Johnston, D.D., 1877 —

D. M. Ross, D.D., 1898 — .

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GLASGOW – WEST SCOTLAND STREET

This congregation began as a mission under Pollokshields Church, worked on Chalmers’ Territorial plan. Church and halls were erected in 1888. The charge was sanctioned in 1900, but no minister was settled until after the Union.

Membership

1900, 305.

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GLASGOW – WHITEINCH

This congregation was begun as a station in 1873. Services were held at first in the cooking depot. A church hall was erected in 1874, and that year the charge was sanctioned. The church was built in 1877, and a manse was purchased in 1881. The congregation was greatly indebted to Gordon Oswald of Scotstoun for sympathy and support.

Membership

1875, 176;

1900, 540.

Ministers

G. W. Cumming, 1874-1881

John Coutts, M.A., 1881 — .

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GLASGOW – WHITE MEMORIAL

In 1884 Alexander Andrew, of Cuninghame Church, was transferred to the plantation district, with a view to forming a new congregation. Services were held at first in Kinning Park Police Hall, then in a wooden structure in Stanley Street. Ultimately a church and halls were bought from the Congregationalists. About three-fourths of the price was contributed by Lord Overtoun, the remainder being proceeds of the sale of Kingston Free Church. The manse was purchased in 1895. The district was densely populated, and gradually grew poorer. Originally Plantation Free Church, the name was changed to White Memorial, in recognition of Lord Overtoun’s generosity.

Membership

1885, 215;

1900, 951.

Ministers

Alex. Andrew, D.D., 1884-1893

James Paterson, B.D., 1894 — .

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GLASGOW – WHITEVALE, CAMLACHIE

The quoad sacra church of Camlachie was vacant at the Disruption, but the congregation “came out.” They continued to worship in the church, where they were joined for a time by the Free Church people from Shettleston, until deprived of it in 1849. Then they met in Camlachie schoolroom while their own church in the Gallowgate was being built. It was opened in 1850. A house at Whitevale was gifted by Mr. John Brown, for a manse. In 1880 church hall and vestry were added. In 1890 the old manse was sold and the proceeds applied towards purchase of a new manse in Broompark Terrace. The church was several times renovated and improved. Active mission work has always been carried on. This was known as Camlachie Free Church till about 1879, when the name was changed to Whitevale.

Membership

1848, 250;

1900, 500.

Ministers

James Findlay, M.A., 1844-1881

John Hanson, M.A., 1878 — .

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GLASGOW – WYND

The congregation of the Free Tron conducted mission work for some time in the Wynd district. Acting with the Home Mission Committee, in 1854, they formed a new congregation, and erected a church. This same year the charge was sanctioned. During a striking history this church originated four new congregations in the district. In 1883, owing to decrease in the population, the charge was reduced to a preaching station. It was then removed to the South Side, and sanction was restored in 1886. The new church and halls were built in 1887-88. Either directly, or through its daughter congregations, some 23 charges in the Presbytery traced their origin to the Wynd Church.

Membership

1859, 364;

1900, 611.

Ministers

Dugald M’Coll, 1854-1860

Robert Howie, D.D., 1860-1864

James Wells, D.D., 1864-1867

John Riddell, B.A., 1868-1872

George Campbell, 1873-1883

John Riddell, B.A. (second pastorate), 1887 — .

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GLASGOW – YOUNG STREET

This congregation was begun as a mission under St. John’s Free Church in 1852. The church was built and opened in October 1856, and a minister was settled over it. The charge, however, was not sanctioned till 1858. A manse was purchased at 15 Wester Craigs, Dennistoun.

Membership

1859, 62;

1900, 700.

Ministers

James Gordon, 1856-1859

W. M. Mackay, 1859-1898

John M’Cracken, 1893 — .

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GLENBOIG

This congregation was begun as a station in 1878, to meet the needs of those employed in the fireclay works, and a small brick church was erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1889. A substantial stone church was built in 1892, the brick church thenceforward being used as a hall. The manse was erected in 1894.

Membership

1890, 161;

1900, 235.

Ministers

Alexander Tait, M.A., 1889-1892

Daniel Galbraith, 1892 — .

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GOVAN – LINTHOUSE

From 1874 a mission, under Free St. Mary’s, Govan, was conducted in a hall at Linthouse Buildings. The mission formed the nucleus of the congregation organised by the Church Extension Committee in April 1900. Church, hall, vestry, and church officer’s house were erected.

Membership

1900, 407.

Minister

J. S. Hastie, B.D., 1900 — .

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GOVAN – ST. COLUMBA’S

Services for the Gaelic-speaking community in Govan were begun in 1862, and continued for eleven years by a probationer. In 1874 the charge was sanctioned. Church, hall, session-house, vestry, and church officer’s house were erected in 1877.

Membership

1875, 125

1900, 435

Ministers

Allan Cameron, 1874-1887

John T. M’Lean, 1887 —

Evan Grant, 1899 —

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GOVAN – ST. MARY’S

This congregation was begun in 1871, in connection with Dr. Robert Buchanan’s Church Extension movement. Sabbath services were held in Govan Hall, Robert Street, and week night services in the Gaelic mission hall. The charge was sanctioned in 1872. The church was erected, and opened in November 1873. The congregation prospered with the growth of this great industrial centre. In 1899, 120 members were disjoined, to aid in developing Linthouse congregation.

Membership

1874, 580;

1900, 1204.

Minister

Robert Howie, D.D., 1872 — .

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GOVAN – SUMMERTON

This church represents the original Govan Free Church. Immediately after the Disruption steps were taken to build and equip a Free church here. During the first year Free Church adherents in the parish worshipped either in Renfrew or at Kingston. The church and manse were erected on the bank of the Clyde, on the site now occupied by the Clyde Trust Graving Dock, the manse being the lower storey of the church. In 1846 the church was enlarged, and a school built. The church was again enlarged in 1862. In 1873 a new church was erected on a different site, the establishment of public works in the neighbourhood having made a change necessary. A number of office-bearers and members were disjoined in 1873, to assist in forming Free St. Mary’s congregation.

Membership

1848, 222

1900, 449

Ministers

Peter Petrie, M.A., 1844-1850

Gilbert Johnstone, 1851-1864 [Under New Cumnock and in Vol.1 it says he was settled there in 1850.]

C. A. Mackenzie, D.D., 1864-1892

W. A. Mill, F.R.G.S., 1892 — .

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HILLHEAD See JORDANHILL

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JORDANHILL, HILLHEAD

This charge, initiated by the Presbytery of Paisley in 1854, was an offshoot of Renfrew Free Church. The charge was sanctioned in 1855. A church was erected in 1858, on a site granted by Miss Oswald of Scotstoun. The congregation, at first called Hillhead, was transferred to the Presbytery of Glasgow in 1866. The manse was built in 1875.

Membership

1859, 80;

1900, 204.

Ministers

Peter MacLachlan, 1859-1870

James Jolly, 1872-1873

A. D. Livingstone, B. D., 1899 — .

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KILSYTH

Dr. W. H. Burns, minister of the parish, and nearly all his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. During the first summer, until their church was erected, they met for worship in the open air. The church was reconstructed in 1870.

Membership

1848, 255;

1900, 384.

Ministers

W. H. Burns, D.D., 1843-1859

Robert Black, M.A., 1854-1888

William Jeffrey, M.D., 1889 — .

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KIRKINTILLOCH – MARSHALL See KIRKINTILLOCH – ST. ANDREW’S.

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KIRKINTILLOCH – ST. ANDREW’S

This congregation, formerly of the United Associate Synod, was admitted into the Free Church, as Marshall Church, in 1855. The name was changed to St. Andrew’s in 1873. A manse was built in the late “fifties.” A new church was erected in 1873.

Membership

1859, 303;

1900, 322.

Ministers

William Marshall, 1856-1860

James Cowe, 1861-1865

Andrew Brown, B.D., 1867 — .

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KIRKINTILLOCH – ST. DAVID’S

The minister and congregation of this Church Extension charge adhered to the Free Church in 1843. In that year the church was erected, and the manse in 1852.

Membership

1855, 350;

1900, 487.

Ministers

Thomas G. Duncan, 1843-1844

David Cunningham, 1844-1868

John Steel, D.D., 1869-1878

William Patrick, D.D., 1878-1892

H. Y. Reyburn, B.D., 1893 — .

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PARTICK – ANDERSON

This congregation was formed immediately after the Disruption, and met first for worship on June 11, 1843. A church was built, and opened in February 1844. A new church on the same site was erected in 1860. The manse was purchased in 1876. Partick, in 1843 a village of 2000 inhabitants, grew very rapidly. The church, built among green fields, came to be in a slum district.

Membership

1848, 229;

1900, 512.

Ministers

Henry Anderson, 1844 —

D. Young, M.A., 1898 — .

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PARTICK – BROOMHILL

This is one of the Extension Charges promoted by the Glasgow Presbytery, which appointed an interim Session in February 1899. James Henderson, formerly of Queen’s Park Church, was inducted to the charge on March 16, 1899. On that day the hall, built on the site secured for a church, was opened. The congregation grew with the increasing population.

Membership

1899, 116;

1900, 196.

Minister

James Henderson, M.A., 1899 — .

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PARTICK – DOWANVALE

Kelvinside Free Church began mission work in the eastern district of Partick about 1871. Services were held first in an iron church, and then in St. James’ Hall. The charge was sanctioned in 1878. A church, with halls and rooms underneath, was erected in 1880.

Membership

1879, 148;

1900, 620.

Minister

James Wallace, 1878 — .

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PARTICK – GAELIC

A mission was begun for the benefit of the Gaelic-speaking residents in the district, about 1875. Worship was conducted for a time in an iron church. The charge was sanctioned in 1887, but no minister was settled till 1898. Church and halls were erected. The congregation suffered somewhat in consequence of the passing of the Declaratory Act.

Membership

1900, 145.

Minister

Alexander Macrae, 1898 — .

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PARTICK – HIGH

This congregation began in a station promoted by local parties, in the western district of Partick, formed in 1863. The charge was sanctioned in 1866. Worship was for a time conducted in a wooden building. A church was erected in 1869.

Membership,—1867, 173;

1900, 431.

Ministers

R. J. Sandeman, D.D., 1867-1872

Henry Bremner, D.D., 1872 — .

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RUTHERGLEN

The minister and congregation of this quoad sacra church adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. Deprived of their church in 1849, they erected a new one in 1850, and shortly after that the manse was built. The growth of the town was mainly towards the east end, away from the church.

Membership

1848, 400;

1900, 540.

Ministers

James Munro, 1843-1884

Lewis Davidson, D.D., 1875-1878

John Gall, M.A., 1879 — .

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RUTHERGLEN – EAST

This congregation, formerly Reformed Presbyterian, joined the Free Church in 1876. The church was erected in 1872. The church was undermined by coal workings, and from 1895 till 1898 the congregation worshipped in the town hall. Progress, thus hindered, was resumed on their return to the church. Increase of the population favoured the growth of the congregation.

Membership

1877, 201;

1900, 312.

Ministers

T. W. Patrick, 1876-1877

William Armstrong, 1878-1889

William Lindsay, M.A., 1889 — .

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SHETTLESTON

The minister of Shettleston and part of his congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The congregation worshipped for a time in a barn, then in a wooden building which they erected. The minister left shortly after the Disruption, and for a short time, in 1844, the congregation was combined with Camlachie. It was made a separate station in 1847, and a church was erected. This building was destroyed in 1850, through failure of the foundations. In 1853 a new church was erected on another site, the old materials being used. Sanction of the charge was restored in 1876. A larger church was built on the same site in 1899.

Membership

1877, 137;

1900, 395.

Ministers

[Perhaps this should figure here: Samuel W. Reid, 1850-1874 – Vol.1]

John Smith, 1876-1887 [Vol.1 says he was ordained 1875.]

John Jeffray, 1887-1892

William Nelson, 1892 — .

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SHETTLESTON – CARNTYNE

In this district, between Parkhead and Shettleston, mission work was begun about 1884. The charge was sanctioned in 1890. The church was opened in June 1893.

Membership

1891, 153;

1900, 369.

Minister

James Allan, 1890 — .

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EAGLESHAM [station]

The preaching station at Eaglesham was maintained from 1843 till 1900, under supervision of the Glasgow Presbytery, services being conducted by student missionaries. The church was built in 1863. J. H. Thomson, minister of the Reformed Presbyterian church in Eaglesham, entered the Free Church at the union in 1876. He was immediately translated to Hightae, and the congregation, which had been drawn from a very wide area, was disbanded, members attaching themselves to nearer churches.


 

25. PRESBYTERY OF DUNOON

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DUNOON

Dr. Mackintosh Mackay, minister of the united parishes of Dunoon and Kilmun, “came out” in 1843. The two charges were separated in 1844. The church was built in 1843, and the manse in 1845. A school was established in 1843. A new school and teacher’s house were erected in 1851. A new church was built in 1867. The school buildings were sold, and staff and scholars transferred to the School Board in 1889. The congregation profited by the growth of the town as a residential and summer resort.

Membership

1848, 459;

1900, 388.

Ministers

Mackintosh Mackay, LL. D., 1843-1853 [Vol.1 says 1852.]

C. C. Mackintosh, D.D., 1854-1868

Robert MacMorran, 1870 — .

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DUNOON – GAELIC

This congregation was formed by the minority in Dunoon Free Church on the settlement there of a purely English-speaking minister in 1870. The charge was sanctioned in 1875. The former United Presbyterian premises were acquired, and adapted for congregational use. The manse was purchased in 1876.

Membership

1877, 142;

1900, 162.

Minister

D. Macnicol, 1876 — .

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INNELLAN

In response to the application of Free Church residents, this congregation was begun in 1852. The church was erected in 1853, and the charge was sanctioned in 1855. The manse was built in 1857. From about the middle of the century Innellan grew in favour as a summer resort.

Membership

1859, 58;

1900, 115.

Ministers

A. C. Smith, 1855-1863

Murdo Macdonald, D.D., 1863-1864

J. J. Muir, 1865-1866 [Vol.1 says he left Innellan in 1869.];

Malcolm White, M.A., 1867-1873

John Irving, 1874-1897 [Vol.1 says he was translated from here in 1898.]

William Stoddart, M.A., 1898 — .

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KILCHATTAN BAY – KINGARTH, SOUTH

Regular services were begun here in 1861. Before the date of the first extant record of Deacons’ Court (1863), church, manse, and school had been built. Great opposition was encountered from the proprietor, the Marquis of Bute, and not a little persecution was endured. The charge was sanctioned in 1868. In 1892 Lord Bute refused a site for a new church; but a feu was given by the old beadle, in return for an annuity of £20. The new church was erected in 1894-95. The new manse, for which no feu, but only a lease of ninety-nine years, could be obtained, was built in 1896. This same year a small hall and vestry were added to the church. The old manse was sold. The name was changed from Kingarth, South, to Kilchattan Bay in 1899.

Membership

1890, 93;

1900, 96.

Ministers

W. Meiklejohn, M.A., 1871-1885

B. J. Davidson, B.D., 1886-1899

J. W. Anderson, 1899 — .

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KILFINNAN

Joseph Stark, minister of the parish, and many of his people, “came out” in 1843. At first they worshipped in the open air, or, in stormy weather, in a barn, or in the public room of the Inn. In 1850 a church was erected at Millhouse, and another, in 1861, at Kilfinnan. At Tighnabruaich, then growing in favour as a summer resort, a church was built in 1863. In 1877 Tighnabruaich was erected into a separate charge. The new congregation got the church there, and gave £800 for purchase of the manse at Auchenlochan. On account of the Declaratory Act, a number of members seceded, and formed the Free Presbyterian congregation.

Membership

1848, 53;

1900, 62.

Ministers

Joseph Stark, M.A., 1843-1877

Duncan Campbell, 1877-1891

Duncan M’Neill, M.A., 1894.

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KILMODAN AND SOUTHHALL

The minister of the parish and the great body of the people, including all the elders, in spite of violent hostility from influential quarters, “came out” in 1843. The heritors refused all facilities for the erection of a place of worship. The congregation were indebted for a site to one of the elders who owned a small property in Glendaruel, where a church was built in the autumn of 1843. Mr. Campbell of Southhall, at the southern extremity of the parish, provided a temporary house for the minister, and placed at the latter’s disposal a small church which had been built for the convenience of his tenantry. There Mr. Maclean gathered a second congregation. He was formally inducted as its minister in 1844, and the congregations of Kilmodan and Southhall were united under his charge. The Established Church authorities attempted to deprive the congregation of the use of Southhall church, but the attempt was frustrated. A manse was erected at a point between the two churches, which are 10 miles apart.

Membership

1848, 54;

1900, 75.

Ministers

Duncan Maclean, 1843-1844

Alexander F. Russell, 1844-1892

Alexander MacGilp, B.D., 1886 — .

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KILMUN

The united parishes of Dunoon and Kilmun were disjoined in March 1844, and erected into separate charges. Church and manse at Kilmun were built soon after the Disruption, and have been several times renovated.

Membership

1848, 83;

1900, 111.

Ministers

Hugh Mackay, 1844-1873

Donald M’Kerchar, 1867 — .

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KINGARTH (ASCOG)

The church here, known locally as Ascog, was erected in 1842-43, and was designed as a chapel-of-ease under Kingarth Parish Church. It was opened as a Free church immediately after the Disruption, and a minister was settled in September 1843. The manse was built in 1855. With the growth of the population two new churches were erected between this church and Rothesay.

Membership

1855, 60;

1900, 80.

Ministers

James Monteith, 1843-1852

R. Williamson, D.D., LL. D., 1853 —

W. Winter, 1890 — .

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KINGARTH, SOUTH See KILCHATTAN BAY.

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LOCHGOILHEAD

Summer services were begun here in 1855. A wooden church was erected in 1858. A preaching station was formed in 1872. The charge was sanctioned in 1883, in which year a new church was built. The manse was provided in 1886.

Membership

1884, 59;

1900, 69.

Ministers

William Gibson, 1883-1899 [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1894.]

J. M’K. Campbell, M.A., 1894 — .

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NORTH BUTE

The minister of the parish and the majority of his congregation “came out” in 1843. The church was built in Port-Bannatyne in that year. A manse also was erected. In 1879 a new church, with hall and vestry below, took the place of the old one.

Membership

1855, 90;

1900, 204.

Ministers

A. M’Bride, 1843-1875

J. T. M’Lean, 1876-1887 [Under Campbeltown – Lorne Street it says he was translated in 1875.]

John Dunlop, 1888 — .

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ROTHESAY – FREE PARISH

Robert Craig, minister of the parish, most of the elders, and 554 members of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. The Gaelic church was found to be too small for them, so they worshipped for a time in the yard of a cooperage, roofed for the purpose. The new church was opened in July 1845. A manse was purchased, and a school built which was maintained for many years. The congregation bought the old Reformed Presbyterian church, and made it the centre of mission work. The population changed in character with the closing of the cotton mills, and the development of Rothesay as a summer resort.

Membership

1848, 554;

1900, 458.

Ministers

Robert Craig, M.A., 1843-1860

R. G. Balfour, D.D., 1858-1866

J. Davidson, M.A., 1867-1877

D. Somerville, D.D., 1878-1885

A. N. Sutherland, M.A., 1886 — .

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ROTHESAY – GAELIC, CHAPELHALL

The minister and the whole congregation of the Gaelic church in Rothesay adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to worship in their church, until deprived of it in 1858. Temporary premises were provided, and a new church was opened in 1860. A manse was purchased later. In 1887, conjointly with the Good Templars, they obtained a hall.

[This church is referred to elsewhere as Chapelhill – not Chapelhall.]

Membership

1870, 138;

1900, 235.

Ministers

J. Macpherson, 1843 (May-September)

A. Anderson, 1844-1866

William Ross, 1867-1883

William Fraser, M.A., 1884 (February-October)

D. M’Cormick, 1885 — .

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ROTHESAY – WEST

Peter M’Bride, the minister of this chapel-of-ease to Rothesay Parish Church, and almost all the congregation, “came out” in 1843. The new church was erected in Argyle Street in 1846. In 1848 the manse was built, mainly through the generosity of John Macfie, one of the elders. In 1875 a tenement of houses, which almost hid the church, was purchased and removed.

Membership

1848, 578;

1900, 388.

Ministers

P. M’Bride, 1843-1846

R. Elder, D.D., 1847-1892

W. E. Brown, M.A., 1883-1886

C. A. Salmond, D.D., 1887-1890

J. D. Williamson, 1891 (February-November)

R. Forgan, B.D., 1892-1898

J. Urquhart, 1899 — [Under Glasgow – Chalmers’ it says he was translated 1900.]

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SANDBANK

Occasional services were held here by the minister of Dunoon until 1862, when regular summer services were provided. A church had been erected in 1859. A probationer was appointed in 1864. The charge was sanctioned in 1867. A manse was built in 1868. The church was rebuilt in 1878.

Membership

1868, 46;

1900, 102.

Ministers

John Headrick, 1867-1894

C. C. Stewart Dron, 1894 — .

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STRACHUR AND STRATH LACHLAN

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, and a minister was settled in January 1844. For ten years no site for a place of worship could be obtained. At length, in 1854, church and manse were erected. The church was renovated in 1889.

Membership

1848, 80;

1900, 87.

Ministers

William Lauder, 1844-1885

Archibald M’Callum, 1883 — .

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TIGHNABRUAICH

From 1856 till 1859 services were held here in the open air, or in a carpenter’s shop. In 1859 services were begun by the minister of Kilfinnan, in a temporary wooden church. A stone church was erected in 1863. The mission continued under Kilfinnan Church till 1877, when the charge was sanctioned. For fourteen years Alexander Stark, formerly of Closeburn, brother of the minister of Kilfinnan, gave his services gratuitously to the church at Tighnabruaich.

Membership

1878,42;

1900, 100.

Ministers

James Young, 1877 —

H. M. Rankin, M.A., 1893 — .