Congregations 3


 

11. PRESBYTERY OF DUMFRIES

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CORSOCK

At the instance of Alexander Murray Dunlop of Corsock, the congregation here was, in 1851, organised on the footing of a preaching station, connected with the congregation of Kirkpatrick-Durham. Mr. Dunlop built the church in 1851-52, and supported a missionary at his own expense. In 1856 it became a separate station under the Home Mission Committee. It served part of three parishes—Kirkpatrick-Durham, Parton, and Balmaclellan. The charge was sanctioned in 1867. The church, which was the property of the Dunlop family, was made over to the congregation in 1875; and in that year the manse was built. The parish burying-ground around the Free Church was also a gift of Mr. Murray Dunlop, and he was buried there himself. The main public interest attaching to the congregation arises from Mr. Murray Dunlop’s connection with it. The part he played in Disruption times is well known. For many years he was legal adviser of the Free Church.

Membership

1868, 113;

1900, 128.

Ministers

Robert Smith, D.D., 1867-1894

Duncan M’Lean, 1894 — .

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DALBEATTIE

James Mackenzie, minister of the quoad sacrachurch here, with his congregation, “came out” in 1843, and a church was built that year. The minister had charge also, for a time, of the lower parts of the parishes of Urr, Colvend, Buittle, Kirkgunzeon, and Kirkbean. The manse was erected in 1850. The church was rebuilt in 1881. During the closing years of the century, the congregation, with the town, suffered from depression of the granite industry.

Membership

1848, 235;

1900, 207.

Ministers

James Mackenzie, M. A., 1843-1844 [Under Annan it says he was translated from here in 1845.]

George Dudgeon, 1848-1865

Robert Wright, 1866-1879

James A. Paton, M.A., 1879 — .

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DALTON

Onthe proposal of the Free Church minister of Ruthwell a preaching station was erected at Dalton in 1862. The movement was an outcome of the Revival of 1860. The congregation was augmented by a number from the Established Church, a few from Ruthwell Free Church, and others from thesurrounding district. For about four years they worshipped in buildings connected with Dalton Meal Mill. The church was built in 1866, at the end of the village, on Dormont estate. The annual feu-duty was sixpence. The charge was sanctioned in 1868. The population of the district declined owing to the introduction of machinery in agriculture.

Membership

1869, 92;

1900, 43.

Ministers

Archibald Craig, 1868-1872

William H. Fullarton, M.A., 1877 — .

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DUMFRIES— MARTYRS’

Thiswas originally a Reformed Presbyterian congregation. It united with the Free Church in 1876. The church was built in 1832, and the manse in 1854. The church had served a very wide district. After the Union the more distant members gradually attached themselves to churches in their own neighbourhood. There is an endowment of £60per annum for mission purposes, left by Mr. Henderson of Nunholm.

Membership

1877, 161;

1900, 133.

Minister

Robert M’Kenna, M.A., 1876 — .

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DUMFRIES— ST. GEORGE’S

Dr. John R. Mackenzie, minister of St. Mary’s quoad sacrachurch, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped for nearly a year in the old Assembly Rooms. The church was built in George Street, and opened in April 1844. The manse was erected in 1846. The church was rebuilt and enlarged in 1892. This involved the sacrifice of the manse. The organ was the gift of Miss Brown, of Westbourne House. In 1883 a suite of halls was erected in Buccleuch Street, and a district hall at Greenbrae. The minister at first, and for some time, had charge of the parishes of Kirkmahoe, Tinwald, Caerlaverock, and the upper part of Torthorwald. The congregation received a great impetus from the revival of 1860-61. A mission was then established at the south end of the town, under care of St. George’s, which afterwards became tlie South Free Church. One of the office-bearers who came out from St. Mary’s at the Disruption still (1900) survives, and is an elder in the congregation.

Membership

1848, 620;

1900, 605.

Ministers

John R. Mackenzie, D.D., 1843-1847

James Julius Wood, D.D., 1848-1877

James Freer, M.A., 1875-1881

Charles M’Neil, M.A., 1882 — .

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DUMFRIES — SOUTH

St. George’s congregation had for some time conducted a mission in the south part of the town. As a result of the Revival of 1860-61, a congregation was formed here. The church was built and opened in January 1865. Manse and halls were also erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1866.

Membership

1869,223;

1900, 301.

Ministers

Gilbert Laurie, B.A., 1866-1875

J. D. M’Kinnon, 1875 — .

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DUNSCORE

Dr. Brydon, minister of Dunscore, and the bulk of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The church was built and opened in 1844. The manse was erected in 1845. School buildings were also provided; which in 1873 were transferred to the Dunscore School Board, the congregation retaining the right to use them at other than school hours. The church was renovated in 1899. The first Free Church minister of Dunscore had also charge of the lower parts of Closeburn and Keir, and the upper parts of Kirkmahoe and Holywood parishes.

Membership

1848, 318;

1900, 144.

Ministers

Robert Brydon, D.D.,1822-1860 [To be in agreement with Ewing’s normal policy, this should read 1843-1860, although he did settle there in 1822.]

James Pollock, 1861 — .

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DUNSCORECRAIG

This was a Reformed Presbyterian congregation. It united with the Free Church in 1876. The church had been built in 1848. It was enlarged, and a vestry added in 1884. The manse was erected in 1888.

Membership

1877, 67;

1900, 140.

Ministers

James Bowie, 1874-1887 [Vol.1 says he was settled here in 1874 but only became a Free Church minister in 1876.]

Alexander Grey, 1887-1897

William Barrowman, 1898 — .

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GLENCAPLE

In consequence of a visit by evangelistic deputies, a preaching station was formed here in 1854. The church was built in 1856. The charge was sanctioned in 1862. A house for manse was purchased in 1867. The congregation was adversely affected by the cessation of boat-building at Kelton and Glencaple, and by the depopulation following agricultural depression.

Membership

1866, 105;

1900, 78.

Ministers

William Lorimer, 1863-1892

Andrew Dickson, 1892-1895

James Malcolm, B.D., 1895 — .

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HIGHTAE

Originally Reformed Presbyterian, this congregation united with the Free Church in 1876. The church, which was built in 1798, was reconstructed in 1865, and renovated in 1880. The manse dates from 1866. In Reformed Presbyterian days the congregation drew its membership from a wide area. The local industry, weaving of stockings, blankets, etc., becoming extinct, the population greatly declined.

Membership

1877, 92;

1900, 101.

Ministers

Matthew Brown, 1876-1877

John H. Thomson, 1877 —

Charles Davidson, 1900. [This agrees with Vol.1, but entry under Strathmiglo – North says he was translated here in 1899.]

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IRONGRAY

Robert Crawford, minister of the parish, and many of his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. They were joined by members from the parishes of Lochrutton and Terregles. The congregational property consisted of church and manse, at the village of Shawhead, and schools in Shawhead and Lochfoot. Irongray is celebrated for its communion stones on Skeoch Hill, its martyrs’ monument, and Covenanting traditions. Sir Walter Scott erected a tombstone in the churchyard over the grave of Helen Walker (Jeanie Deans). Decreasing population depressed the membership of the congregation, which was also adversely affected by the formation of the station at Craig, Dunscore.

Membership

1848, 219;

1900, 107.

Ministers

Robert Crawford, 1843-1844

Alexander Grierson, M.A., 1844-1880

David B. Mearns, 1880-1886

Thomas M. Mailer, 1887 — .

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KIRKBEAN AND SOUTHWICK

The adherents of the Free Church in Southwick and Kirkbeanwereat first served by a probationer, on the footing of a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1844. The congregation worshipped in a barn in Southwick, and in an old mill in Kirkbean. A church was built, and opened in 1845. The manse was erected in 1850. The population steadily declined owing to emigration.

Membership

1848, 200;

1900, 99.

Ministers

Robert Gibson, 1844-1888

W. J. Rae,1882-1894

George Higgs, M.A., 1895 — .

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KIRKMAHOE

At the Disruption, William Andson, probationer, secured the use of the old Reformed Presbyterian Church at Quarrelwood, vacant since the transfer of the Reformed Presbyterian congregation to Dumfries in 1833. Here he conducted services for adherents of the Free Church from the parishes of Torthorwald, Tinwald, and Kirkmahoe. The charge was sanctioned in February 1844. The church was built in 1845. It was reconstructed in 1864-65. A hall was added in 1891. The church was again renovated in 1894. The manse, built in 1846, was enlarged in 1900. Declining population told seriously on the membership.

Membership

1848, 186;

1900, 158.

Ministers

William Andson,1844— [He retired 1884, Vol.1.]

William M’Dowall, M.A., 1884 — .

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KIRKPATRICK-DURHAM

Dr. George J. C. Duncan, minister of the parish, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The church was erected soon after the Disruption, the school in 1847, and the manse in 1849. The church was reconstructed in 1870, and church and manse were renovated in 1894. At first parts of the parishes of Urr and Parton were under the care of the minister. The formation of the charge at Corsock considerably diminished the membership, which was also affected by the steady decline of the population.

Membership

1848, 263;

1900, 116.

Ministers

George J. C. Duncan, D.D., 1843-1844

Jamieson Willis, 1845-1874

James Gibson, 1861-1887

James Craig, 1888 — .

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LOCHEND AND NEW ABBEY

From 1843 till 1861 Lochend and New Abbey, six miles apart, were separate Home Mission stations. In 1861 they were united under one probationer. The charge was sanctioned in 1863. Public worship was held in a barn at Lochend farm, and when the church was built at the east end of the village of Beeswing, in 1857, it was called “Lochend.” A new church was built at the west endofthe village in 1868, and in 1873 the old church was transferred to the School Board. A church was erected at New Abbey in 1878, and a manse at Beeswing in 1865.

Membership

1872, 101;

1900, 106.

Ministers

John Davidson, 1864 (some months)

Daniel M. Duncan, 1865-1871

David Brunton, 1872-1874

William D. Thomson, M.A., 1874-1900

Robert Howie, M.A., 1900 — .

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MAXWELLTOWN

The members of the quoad sacra,church at Maxwelltown, led by their minister, James Begg, had taken an active part locally in the movement which issued in the Disruption. Supply was at once provided, and a church was built at Lawrieknowe by December 1843. The manse was erected in 1846. A new church was built in 1866, and halls, behind the church, in 1885. The congregation drew many members from Dumfries, and the country district around. A large and increasing population of factory workers, and a slowly growing residential class in the western district, contributed to the success of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 470;

1900, 585.

Ministers

W. B. Clark, D.D.,1844-1853

David Purves, 1853-1883

Frank Rae, M.A., 1884-1890

C. H. Todd, M.A., 1890-1895

R. G. Maclntyre, B.D., 1895- — .

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RUTHWELL

Dr. Henry Duncan, minister of the parish, and many of his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. Others from the district joined them. At first the congregation worshipped in the open air. The church was built at Mount Kedar, and opened in October 1843. The site was inconvenient, but no other was available. The minister found shelter in a roadside cottage, until the manse was built, in 1844. The church was reconstructed in 1859, and reseated in 1893. The congregation got a lease of the cottage in which Dr. Duncan, in 1810, founded the Savings Bank, and used it for religious services. The membership was reduced by the founding of Dalton Church, and also in consequence of serious decrease of the population. Originally connected with Lockerbie Presbytery the congregation, in 1847, was transferred to that of Dumfries.

Membership

1848, 200;

1900, 128.

Ministers

Henry Duncan, D.D., 1843-1846

Alexander Brown, 1845-1887

A. Angus, M.A., 1886 — .

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12. PRESBYTERY OF PENPONT

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CLOSEBURN

The congregation was formed at the Disruption. It became a sanctioned charge in 1844. For a time public worship was conducted in a barn at the farm of Brownhill, and occasionally, in fine weather, under the “preaching tree” between Trigony and Closeburn village. A site was obtained with difficulty, and a church erected in 1844. The manse was built in 1847. Owing to trouble arising in this connection, Alexander Stark, the minister, resigned his charge. In 1850 it was reduced to a preaching station. In 1851 it was sanctioned again, and James Hutton, who meantime had laboured there, was settled. The trouble over the manse, the shutting of the lime works, and decrease of the population, told adversely on the congregation.

Membership

1854, 200;

1900, 158.

Ministers

Alexander Stark, M.A., 1844-1849

James Hutton, 1851 —

James Main, B.D., 1895 — .

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GLENCAIRN

Patrick Borrowman, three elders, and a large part of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. Mr. Borrowman had taken an active part in the movement, and local sympathy was very strongly with the Non-Intrusionists. The United Secession Church in Moniaive was kindly granted for service on Sunday afternoons. The church, not far from the village, was built, and opened in December 1843. The manse was erected at the same time. The church was renovated in 1888, and in 1890 a hall was gifted to the congregation. A school also was provided.

Membership

1848, 460;

1900, 229.

Ministers

Patrick Borrowman, 1843-1899

John Telfer, 1886-1891

David Fyffe, M.A., 1891-1896

R. G. Philip, M.A., 1896 — .

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PENPONT

This congregation originated at the Disruption, and was drawn from six neighbouring parishes. During the summer and autumn of 1843, public worship was frequently conducted in the open air. At first no site could be obtained, owing to the paramount influence of the Duke of Buccleuch; but a poor weaver, Janet Douglas Fraser, voluntarily bequeathed her small freehold to the congregation. The deed of gift bears this interesting docquet: “This deed of gift is to be as free from henceforth to the Free Church of Scotland as I wish the Heavenly Mansions to be made to me, and to last the property of the Free Church while sun, moon and stars endure. (Signed) Janet Douglas Fraser.” Here the church was built, supported underneath by strong stone pillars, between which were stalls for thirty horses. The church was opened in 1844. A property of 3 acres on the opposite side of the road was purchased for the congregation, and there a manse was built in 1847. The church was remodelled in 1886. A school was bought in Thornhill, and altered into a church hall. The congregation suffered owing to the great decline of population in the surrounding parishes. See Mr. Black’s The Story of Virginhall.

Membership

1848, 630;

1900, 400.

Ministers

R. Crawford, 1844-1856

George Laing, 1857-1868

David Black, M.A., 1868 — .

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PENPONT—WEST

Originally Reformed Presbyterian, this congregation united with the Free Church in 1876. Scaurbridge Church, as it was locally called, had a long and honourable history, standing in the centre of a great Covenanting district. Church and manse were situated about half a mile west of Penpont parish church. The district was agricultural and pastoral, with a decreasing population.

Membership

1877, 142;

1900, 119.

Ministers

William Milroy, B.A., 1876-1893

William Simpson, M.A., 1893 — .

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SANQUHAR

In the movement that led to the Disruption, the minister of Sanquhar adhered to the protesting party; but he did not “come out” in 1843. There was, however, a large exodus of his people, who formed the Free Church congregation. Persecution and difficulties of various kinds had to be faced; but before the end of 1844 the church was built. The manse was erected in 1849. The closing of Crawick Carpet Mills greatly reduced the number of members. The top of the old cross of Sanquhar (1680), where the famous declarations were read, one by Richard Cameron on June 22, 1680, the other by James Renwick on May 29, 1685, was placed on the apex of the roof of the church porch.

Membership

1848, 440;

1900, 203.

Ministers

William Logan, 1843-1863

Stevenson Smith, 1863-1883

John Fleming, 1883 — .

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WANLOCKHEAD

Thomas Hastings, minister of Wanlockhead, and a large proportion of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. For ten years the Duke of Buccleuch absolutely refused a site. The minister’s family were compelled to live for eight years in Dumfries, 30 miles distant. In this, the highest inhabited district in Scotland, the people worshipped under the open, and often storm-swept sky, or in the scattered cottages. At length, in 1853, church and manse were built. Till 1897 the charge appears in the Blue Book as Wanlockhead and Leadhills.

Membership

1848, 230;

1900, 169.

Ministers

Thomas Hastings, 1843-1875

J. Moir Porteous, D.D., 1868-1881

Andrew Brown, 1881-1895

Duncan M’Kinnon, M.A., 1896 — .

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DURRISDEER[station]

This rural mission or preaching station was connected at first with Penpont congregation, but in 1847 became a presbyterial mission. It supplied ordinances to scattered Free Church families in the parishes of Durrisdeer andCrawford.

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13. PRESBYTERY OF STRANRAER

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CAIRNRYAN

The congregation was started here as an extension charge before the Disruption, and was worked along with Inch. In 1844 it was sanctioned as a separate charge. The only site obtainable was the garden of some houses leased by a local supporter of the Free Church. There the church was built, and opened in 1845. The manse was erected in 1856. The congregation suffered from rural depopulation.

Membership

1848, 80;

1900, 41.

Ministers

A. L. M’Cririe, 1846-1884

John Jamieson, 1854 — .

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GLENLUCE

From July 1843 supply was arranged for “Old and New Luce.” The charge was sanctioned in 1847. The church was built in 1844, the school about 1849, and the manse in 1897. In 1877 the school, no longer needed for educational purposes, was converted into three dwelling-houses.

Membership

1848, 100;

1900, 168.

Ministers

George Wilson, 1848-1899

A. K. Dallas, M.A., 1895-1898

John Urquhart, 1898 — .

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INCH

In June 1843 supply was arranged for Inch and Cairnryan. In January 1844, Inch was sanctioned as a separate charge. Church and manse were built soon after the Disruption. The church was supported by many farmers in the parish. The membership was reduced by the formation of the station at New Luce.

Membership

1848, 270;

1900, 129.

Ministers

Peter Ferguson, 1845-1879

John F. Daly, B.D., 1879-1882

Robert Tennent Cunningham, M.A., 1882-1887

Alexander Duff Watson, B.D., 1887-1895

Quintin Dick Whyte, 1895 — .

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KIRKCOLM

Supply was arranged for the congregation here from July 1843. They worshipped for a time in the farmhouses of Knocktinan and Kirminnoch. Church and manse were built in 1844-45 on a site granted by Sir Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw. Stones and carting were given free, and a building grant was made by the Ferguson Bequest. The charge was sanctioned in 1845.

Membership

1848, 165;

1900, 137.

Ministers

Andrew McDowall, 1849-1864

William Armstrong. 1865-1878

Robert Gladstone, 1878-1888

George Peattie, M.A., 1888 — .

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KIRKMAIDEN

John Lamb, minister of the parish, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The Free Church congregation met first in a field at Low Drummore, the minister preaching from a tent. The church was built, and opened in November 1843. William Todd, an elder, who had been parochial teacher for forty years, was deposed from that office by the Presbytery of Stranraer for adhering to the Free Church.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 212.

Ministers

John Lamb, 1843-1855

William Forlong, 1853-1857 [Vol.1 says he was appointed elsewhere in 1858.]

James Cavan, 1857 —

Walter Alexander, M.A., 1898 — .

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LESWALT

Thomas B. Bell, minister of Leswalt, one elder, and many of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. The church was built that year; also a school and teacher’s house. Sir Andrew Agnew granted the use of Kirkland Cottage to Mr. Bell (his son-in-law) until the manse was built in 1862. The hall was erected in 1881. The congregation suffered through rural depopulation.

Membership

1848, 272;

1900, 144.

Ministers

Thomas Blizzard Bell, 1843-1864

Alexander Warrack, M.A., 1864 — .

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PORTPATRICK

Andrew Urquhart, two elders, and most of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. The handsome church they had newly erected was taken from them. They worshipped for a time on the green near the shore. The church was built, and opened in the winter of 1843. A manse was erected in 1846. After being thrice renovated the original church was replaced by a new building in 1887. A new manse was built in 1891. Portpatrick declined in population after the mail steamers for Ireland ceased to start from the port. After 1880, however, the place grew steadily in popularity as a summer resort.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 226.

Ministers

Andrew Urquhart, M.A., J.P.,1843-1890

John Brownlie, D.D., 1885 — .

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SHEUCHAN

Robert Donald, the minister, and the whole congregation of Sheuchan Church extension charge, one member excepted, “came out” in 1843. Deprived of the building by legal proceedings at the close of 1844, they worshipped in a neighbouring mill until their own church was erected. A manse was also provided.

Membership

1848, 150;

1900, 321.

Ministers

Robert Donald, 1843-1850

George Sherwood, M.A., 1852 —

Thomas Russell, M.A., 1891 — .

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STONEYKIRK

Robert M’Neil, the minister, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The church was built in1844, the manse in 1846, and, subsequently, school and teacher’s house. The congregation suffered through shifting and decline of the rural population, and the hostile influence of landed proprietors; while two other churches were built within four miles of the Free Church.

Membership

1848, 400;

1900, 162.

Ministers

Robert M’Neil, 1843-1852

R. Scrimgeour, 1853-1861

Thomas Brown, M.A.,1862-1877

George Philip Robertson, M.A., 1877 — .

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STRANRAER

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, three elders and a large number of members adhering to the Free Church. They met for worship in various places until the church was built in 1844. A manse was erected in 1856. Church and manse were renovated in 1890. A school, built in 1850, was transferred to the Stranraer School Board in 1872.

Membership

1848, 360;

1900, 243.

Ministers

George Charles, 1844-1881

David Miller, M.A.,1881 — .

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14. PRESBYTERY OF WIGTOWN

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ISLE OF WHITHORN

This congregation was at first united with Whithorn under one minister, with separate session. The congregation worshipped for a time in a wooden shed. The local proprietor refused a site for a church, but the Town Council granted one on the shore, where the church was built in 1844. Much of the labour was given free. The church was renovated in 1856, and again in 1890. Decline of the shipping trade through extension of the railway to Whithorn, reduced the population.

Membership

1848, 125;

1900, 121.

Minister

J. C. M’Taggart, M.A., 1876 — .

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NEWTON-STEWART

Originally Reformed Presbyterian, this congregation joined the Free Church in 1876. The church, built in 1833, was subsequently improved. The manse, at first a four-roomed house, was enlarged in 1843, and a wing was added in 1895. When formed, this congregation served all Galloway; but other congregations were founded. Reformed Presbyterian families died out, the distinctive principle for which it stood became of less practical importance, and late in the nineteenth century the number of members grew very small.

Membership

1877, 60;

1900, 137.

Ministers

James Goold, 1876-1895

William H. Brown Douglas, B.A., 1894 — .

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NEWTON-STEWART – PENNINGHAME AND MINNIGAFF,or CREEBRIDGE

This congregation was formed on July 3, 1843. No site could be obtained in the town. The church was built at Creebridge in the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright in 1844, and the manse in 1846. Gallery and vestry were added to the church in 1862. A mission was maintained at Creetown.

Membership

1848, 360;

1900, 245.

Ministers

John Walker, 1843-1863

James M. M’Culloch, 1864-1877

William Strachan, 1877-1883 [Vol.1 says he retired in 1877.]

Alexander Stewart, 1884 — .

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PORT-WILLIAM

This congregation took its rise in meetings held in the open air by Mr. Walker of Creebridge in 1857. Service was held for a time in the smithy, and then in the Masonic Hall. A church was built in 1863 on a feu subsequently purchased from Sir H. Maxwell. The manse was erected in 1891, in which year the church was renovated and the hall built. The charge was sanctioned in 1872.

Membership

1872, 120;

1900,112.

Ministers

James Kerr Thomson, 1875-1888

James Simpson, M.A., 1889 — [Vol.1 says he died in 1900.]

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SORBIE

Dr.Alexander Forrester, assistant minister of the parish, and about half the members of the congregation, “came out” in 1843. Dr. Forrester was the only minister in Wigtown Presbytery who left the Establishment. On him, therefore, it fell at first to form and organise the Free churches within the bounds. A site for a church was refused by the principal proprietors. David Rodger, a member, purchased a feu in the village of Sorbie, and gave it to the congregation. There the church was built in 1844, and the manse in 1848. The church was renovated in 1873.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 121.

Ministers

Alexander Forrester, D.D.,1843-1844

Samuel Crawford Blair, 1845-1879

James Gorrie, 1864 — .

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WHITHORN

This congregation was formed on July 27, 1843. Whithorn and Isle of Whithorn were sanctioned as separate charges, with their own sessions, under one minister. A site was gifted to the congregation by John Milroy, and a church was erected in 1844. Materials and carting were given free by the neighbouring farmers. The use of the Reformed Presbyterian Church was kindly granted for worship on Sabbath afternoons while the church was being built. A hall was built in 1896, and called the “Anderson Memorial Hall,” in memory of the first minister. In 1876 a minister was settled in Isle of Whithorn. The congregation suffered through decline of the agricultural population.

Membership

1848, 145;

1900, 124.

Ministers

F. F. Anderson, M.A., 1843-1891

D. Kennedy, 1878 — .

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WIGTOWN

This congregation, which began as a preaching station, was sanctioned as a full charge in the end of 1843. Lack of funds to complete the church which was being erected for the Relief Church, led to the unfinished building being offered for sale. It was purchased on behalf of the congregation, and became the Free Church of Wigtown.

Membership

1848, 238;

1900, 153.

Ministers

James Falconer, 1844-1851

D. C. A. Agnew, 1851-1887

R. Gladstone, 1875-1878

J. B. Reid, M.A., 1878 — .

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NEW LUCE[station]

This congregation was formed on the footing of a preaching station in 1862. Worship was held for three years in Waterfoot Barn, a thatched building near the river Luce. In 1865 what is known as the “Old Manse” was erected. The minister lived on the ground floor, and the upper was used for public worship. The church was built in 1871. On a stone above the western window is the inscription, “Peden Memorial Church,1871” – commemorating Peden’s brief ministry at New Luce, from which he was ejected in 1663. The church was renovated in 1894. Owing to the small population, New Luce never reached the status of a sanctioned charge.

Membership

1870, 51;

1900, 65.

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15. PRESBYTERY OF KIRKCUDBRIGHT

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AUCHENCAIRN

This congregation was formed by adherents of the Free Church in 1843. At the Disruption there was only a Baptist Church in the village, Rerrick parish church being 6 miles distant. During the summer, services were held in the open air, and then in an old saw-mill, until the church was built and opened in November 1844. The landlord refused ground for manse; but after his death, his sister, Miss Welsh of Collin, granted a feu, and subsequently made a free gift of it and 7 acres of adjoining land to the congregation. She also presented a dwelling-house for the teacher of the Free Church school. The manse was completed in 1854. The church was renovated in 1877. Owing to the closing of the iron, copper and barytes mines, and other causes, the population considerably declined. The village became to some extent a summer resort.

Membership

1848, 270;

1900, 194.

Ministers

J. Gray Murray, D.D., 1844-1863

Patrick M’Neil, 1863-1900

Thomas Paterson, M.A., 1900 — .

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BALMAGHIE

Inthe village of Laurieston, in the parish of Balmaghie, a congregation was organised, and a church erected in 1845. There was difficulty in obtaining the services of a suitable agent; but satisfactory progress was made, and the charge was sanctioned in 1855. A manse was also provided.

Membership

1859, 71;

1900, 55.

Ministers

John Johnstone, 1856-1878

Francis Gordon, M.A., 1878-1880

A. B. Craig, 1880 — .

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BORGUE

Samuel Smith, minister of the parish, and about a third of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The congregation worshipped for a time in Shank Barn. The minister lived in a cottage called Katrine Bank. Church and manse were erected within two years. Both were renovated in 1900. The congregation suffered heavily owing to rural depopulation.

Membership

1848, 142;

1900, 65.

Ministers

Samuel Smith, 1843-1861

James T. Stuart, M.A., 1862-1867

George Elder, 1867-1899

J. B. Athol Gordon, M.A., 1899 — .

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CASTLE-DOUGLAS

No minister in the surrounding parishes “came out” in 1843. The adherents of the Free Church in the town and district were formed into a congregation and organised by Mr. Kinnear of Torthorwald, and they called their first minister in November 1843. They worshipped for a time in the open air at the side of Carlingwark Loch. A church of the usual Disruption type was built in Cotton Street in 1844, much labour being given free. This year a school was founded which was the chief educational seminary in the district till 1872, when the School Board took over the work. The first manse, a one-storey building near the Loch, was sold in 1858, and a new manse erected. In 1865 a new church was built in King Street. A mission was conducted in the village of Rhonehouse, in a hall given by John Cowan of Dildawn. This congregation, and the Free Church cause throughout the Stewartry, were greatly indebted to the Cowan family. Their estate of Dildawn, which realised £35,000, passed to the Free Church, as residuary legatee.

Membership

1848, 330;

1900, 248.

Ministers

George Brown, 1843-1887 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1887.]

William Jamieson, 1887 — .

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CASTLE-DOUGLAS – MACMILLAN

Originally Reformed Presbyterian, this congregation joined the Free Church in 1876. The church was purchased from the Relief body in 1820. It was several times altered and improved. It is “the Kirk on the Hill” of Mr. Crockett, the novelist, who was brought up in the congregation. The manse in the church grounds, originally a cottage, was considerably enlarged. As a Reformed Presbyterian congregation it long drew its members from a wide district, including twelve parishes. As a Free church it increased with the growth of the town.

Membership

1877, 224;

1900, 300.

Minister

George Laurie, 1876 — .

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GIRTHON AND ANWOTH

Robert Jeffrey, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. Those who followed him met for worship at first in the Freemasons’ Hall at Gatehouse. A site was with difficulty obtained, and the church built in 1844. The manse was erected in 1849.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 98.

Ministers

Robert Jeffrey, 1843-1844

Robert M. Hanna, 1844-1848

John Robertson, 1849-1882

Robert B. M’Glashan, M.A., 1883 — .

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GLENKENS

This congregation was formed in 1843 by adherents of the Free Church from the parishes of Dalry, Kells, and Balmaclellan, and was in charge of a probationer for three years. The church was built, one and a half miles east of Dalry, in 1845; the farmers carting materials free. The manse was erected in 1847.

Membership

1848, 172;

1900, 133.

Ministers

John Haining, 1846-1889

Neil Buchanan, 1883 — .

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KIRKCUDBRIGHT

Dr. John Macmillan, minister of the parish, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Largely through the liberality of friends in New York, church and manse were built in 1845-46. A new church was erected in 1874, Thomas Clark, artist, contributing £500 towards the cost; and the manse was reconstructed in 1900.

Membership

1848, 430;

1900, 470.

Ministers

John Macmillan, D.D., 1843-1876

Alexander Marshall, M.A., 1874 — .

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TONGLAND AND TWYNHOLM

Neither minister nor elder in these two parishes “came out” in 1843. The adherents of the Free Church were formed into a congregation on the footing of a preaching station, and met for worship in Barcaple Barn. The charge was sanctioned in April 1844. The church was built in 1845, and was several times renovated. The manse was built some distance from the church, owing to difficulties about site. A new manse was erected in 1880, on a site, with 2 acres of ground near the church, granted by W. M. Neilson of Queenshill. Few of the farmers joined the Free Church. The congregation was greatly helped by Robert Ewart of Allershaw, who for some time resided in Dunjop House. In 1894, Mr. Neilson of Queenshill purchased the old school building in Twynholm, and presented it to the congregation for a church hall. Mr. Neilson left a legacy of £1500, the annual interest of which to supplement the minister’s stipend.

Membership

1848, 120;

1900, 108.

Ministers

Josiah Rhenius, M.A., 1844-1878

Alex. Skene, M.A., 1874-1877

Peter Fisher, M.A., 1877 — .

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