Congregations 2


 

6. PRESBYTERY OF DUNS AND CHIRNSIDE

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ALLANTON

After the Disruption supply was provided for Allanton and Chirnside, Mr. Adam Spence acting as catechist in the district. The congregation was organised by John Wallace, minister of Abbey St Bathans, who “came out” in 1843. The church was built in 1844, some distance from the village, any nearer site having been refused. At first the congregation was drawn from Edrom, Chirnside, Whitsome, and Hutton. Afterwards churches were provided in Chirnside and Hutton parishes.

Membership

1848, 310;

1900, 194.

Ministers

John C. Fairbairn, 1844-1873

Duncan MacLean, B.D., 1874-1887

Charles Blades, 1887 — .

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CHIRNSIDE

The Reformed Presbyterian congregation here, in the midst of a Covenanting district, formed from the “ Praying Societies” before 1780, joined the Free Church in 1876. The manse was renovated in 1892, and a new church was built on the old site in 1897.

Membership

1877, 158;

1900, 239.

Ministers

Robert Naismith, 1876-1891

John Somerville, B.D., 1891 — .

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DUNS, BOSTON CHURCH

William Cousin, minister of Boston Church (quoad sacra), and all his congregation, some forty, “came out” in 1843, carrying the property with them. The church was built in 1839, and the manse in 1850.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 298.

Ministers

William Cousin, 1843-1846

James Manson, 1848-1857

John Fordyce, 1858-1866

John Miller, M.A., 1868 — .

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EYEMOUTH, ST. JOHN’S

John Turnbull, minister of the parish, and his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped in a sail loft in Harbour Road until the church built in High Street was opened in 1844. The manse in Albert Road was built some years later. A new church was erected in Victoria Road, and opened in 1879. The congregation benefited greatly in the Revival of 1859-61. In the terrible fishing disaster of October 14, 1881, several valued members perished.

Membership

1848, 170;

1900, 213.

Ministers

John Turnbull, 1843-1870

Alexander Ogilvy, M.A., 1868-1877

James Miller, 1877-1887

John Miller, 1887 — .

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GRANT’S HOUSE

Supply was provided at Auchencrow, a village three miles west of Reston, for those who “came out” of Houndwood quoad sacra church in 1843. After a time part of the congregation worshipped in a barn at Harelawside, near Grant’s House. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. A church was built at Houndwood in 1847, on a site granted by Mrs. Coulson, and a manse three-quarters of a mile to the east. The formation of a congregation at Reston, due largely to the efforts of Adam Spence, restricted the area from which members could be drawn, and in 1888 church and manse were removed from Houndwood to Grant’s House. This involved a reduction of membership, but secured a better distribution of churches.

Membership

1848, 293;

1900, 150.

Ministers

Adam Spence, 1845-1882

James Marshall, B.D., 1882 — .

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GREENLAW

John Fairbairn, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. The congregation worshipped in an old dwelling-house which had been adapted for the purpose, till the church was built and opened in 1844. A new and larger church was erected in 1856, the congregation having been increased by union with an Original Secession congregation. A side gallery was added in 1863, and another in 1880. The manse was built in 1847. The congregation benefited greatly by the revival in 1860, and again in 1869. Later it suffered through depopulation of the district.

Membership

1848, 328;

1900, 168.

Ministers

John Fairbairn, 1842-1895 [He became a Free Church minister in 1843.]

Alexander Cameron, M.A., 1875 — .

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LANGTON

Dr. John Brown, minister of the parish, and his whole congregation, “came out” in 1843. When the minister deputed by the Established Church Presbytery came to preach the church vacant, he could not get a single witness, and returned without holding a service. The congregation worshipped at first in a large granary near Langton House, fitted up by the Dowager Marchioness of Breadalbane, who, with her cousin Lady Hannah Tharpe, joined the church. The Marquis of Breadalbane, proprietor of Langton, to whom Dr. Brown had been tutor, was one of the first elders of the congregation. The church was built in 1843 near the village of Gavinton. The Dowager Marchioness presented the congregation with a complete set of sacramental linen and communion plate. She erected an excellent house for the use of Dr. Brown, which his successors occupied at an almost nominal rent. Lady Hannah Tharpe at her death left a mortification of £1000, directing that the annual interest be paid to the minister and his successors in office.

Membership

1848, 152;

1900, 138.

Ministers

John Brown, D.D., 1843-1848

William Logan, M.A., 1849-1880

Johnstone Walker, M.A., 1880 — .

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LONGFORMACUS

In December 1844, forty-four adherents of the Free Church petitioned the Presbytery for the erection of a church and supply of ordinances. As the outcome of a meeting held in Mr. W. Morscript’s barn in July 1845, a catechist was appointed in December of that year. The church was built in 1848. Lord Breadalbane gave the stones; labour and carting were done by the people and the farmers. In 1869 seating accommodation was increased, and a vestry added. The manse was built in 1870, in which year the charge was sanctioned. The congregation consisted mainly of farmers and shepherds, who came long distances to church.

Membership

1871, 107;

1900, 91.

Minister

George Taylor, M.A., 1870 — .

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MORDINGTON

George F. Knight, minister of the parish, and the bulk of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. A church was built forthwith. The manse was erected in 1850. The church stood on the border between Scotland and England. It was accessible from three parishes, the population of which steadily declined, several mills and tile-works being closed.

Membership

1848, 110;

1900, 55.

Ministers

George Fulton Knight, M.A., 1843-1844

James Kitchan, 1844-1871

Alexander Christie, 1871-1893

P. Geddes Hendry, M.A., 1894 — .

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RESTON

This congregation owed its origin to the efforts of Adam Spence, minister of Houndwood (Grant’s House) Free Church. Up to 1878 united services were conducted here by Mr. Spence and the United Presbyterian ministers of Ayton and Coldingham. The development of Reston as a busy railway junction and cattle market made regular ordinances necessary. It was put in charge of a student missionary under supervision of Mr. Spence. A church was built and opened in 1880. The charge was sanctioned in 1881. The manse was built in 1882.

Membership

1882, 122;

1900, 240.

Minister

W. H. Telford, 1881 — .

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ST. ABB’S

In 1843 and in 1847 the Free Church residents of Coldingham asked the Presbytery for regular services. Only occasional services could be arranged. In 1889 a station was formed in Coldingham Shore, or St. Abb’s, then growing in favour as a holiday resort. Through the liberality of Andrew Usher of Northfield, a church was built in 1892, and an endowment of £50 per annum provided. The charge was sanctioned in 1895. The manse was built in 1898.

Membership

1896, 127;

1900, 144.

Minister

J. S. Allison, 1895 — .

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SWINTON

This congregation was organised immediately after the Disruption. A church and manse were built in 1843. A new church was erected in 1860. The members were mostly working people, with small wages.

Membership

1848, 260;

1900, 248.

Ministers

Thomas Wright, 1843-1882

William Shearer, 1870 — .

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7. PRESBYTERY OF KELSO

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COLDSTREAM

Occasional services were appointed here, under the Presbytery of Duns and Chirnside, in August 1843, and steady progress was made. The charge was sanctioned in 1845, and the first minister was settled in 1847. In 1872 the congregation was transferred to the Presbytery of Kelso, on grounds of convenience.

Membership

1848, 221;

1900, 360.

Ministers

Alexander Rodger, 1847-1870

Robert Paul, 1870-1879

J. R. Gillies, M.A., 1879-1887

James Rutherford, B.D., 1887-1896

Alexander Hay, 1896 — .

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ECCLES

A congregation was formed here in 1843 on the footing of a preaching station; but before the end of 1844, church and manse had been built, and a minister was settled in 1845. The district is agricultural, and it suffered from depopulation.

Membership

1848, 180;

1900, 66.

Ministers

Andrew Cunningham, 1845-1879

D. M. Black, 1880 — .

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GORDON

This congregation was formed in 1843. The church was built that year, and the manse in 1849. The church was improved in 1892, when Mr. Wood Brown gifted a porch, tower, and belfry, and also a library for the use of the minister and the Presbytery.

Membership

1848, 128;

1900, 159.

Ministers

John Fraser, 1843-1869

William Dale, 1869-1871

William Steven, 1872-1873

A. Phimister, M.A., 1874-1882

J. Wood Brown, M.A., 1883-1895

W. Adamson McCallum, M.A., 1895 — .

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KELSO – EAST

The minister of Sprouston parish, and part of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped in the old Original Secession Church in Kelso until their new church, in the outskirts of the town, was opened in 1846. A manse was built in 1867. The church was renovated in 1882. In 1883 the name of the congregation was changed from Sprouston to Kelso, East.

Membership

1848, 414;

1900, 221.

Ministers

George Craig, 1843-1866

Robert M. Webster, 1867-1872

Alex. M. Craig, M.A., 1872 — .

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KELSO – NORTH

Dr Horatius Bonar, minister of the North Church, and his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The church had been built in 1837, in connection with the Church Extension Scheme. The congregation retained it until in 1864 it was claimed by the Established Church. A new church was built and opened in 1867.

Membership

1848, 360;

1900, 281.

Ministers

Horatius Bonar, D.D., 1843-1866

James T. Stuart, M.A., 1867-1877

Sir William Robertson Nicoll, LL. D., 1877-1886

John Skinner, D.D., 1886-1890

David S. Adam, D.D., 1890-1895

John Watson, M.A., 1896 — .

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MAKERSTOUN

At the Disruption a group of Free Church adherents formed a congregation here, and supply was provided by the Presbytery. Miss Elizabeth Makdougall, sister of Lady Brisbane Makdougall, who resided in Makerstoun House, took a leading and generous part, presenting church and manse to the congregation. She also left .£500, the interest to be paid to the Sustentation Fund. The charge was sanctioned in 1847. Church and manse were renovated in 1886.

Membership

1848, 78;

1900, 95.

Ministers

David Dobbie, 1848-1895

George Shiers, 1896 — .

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MOREBATTLE

This congregation was begun by a small company, who adhered to the Free Church, in 1843. Occasional supply was granted by the Presbytery. For a time they worshipped in the open air, at the farmstead of Heughhead. A church was built in 1845, mainly through the efforts of the people themselves; and that year the charge was sanctioned. The congregation suffered through rural depopulation.

Membership

1848, 128;

1900, 158.

Ministers

J. G. Wright, LL. D., 1847-1854

P. C. Purves, 1855-1876

A. S. Mactavish, 1876 — .

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NENTHORN

The congregation formed here in 1843 embraced adherents also from the parishes of Stitchel, Smailholm, and Ednam. A site for a church in Smailholm was refused. The congregation at Nenthorn was therefore largely drawn from that parish. The church was built in 1843, the manse in 1846-47, and the school in Smailholm in 1845.

Membership

1848, 170;

1900, 115.

Ministers

Robert Lang, 1843-1879

Robert Hill, M.A., 1879-1884

Donald Iverach, M.A., 1885-1899

William Galloway, M.A., 1899 — .

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SPROUSTON. See KELSO – EAST.

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WESTRUTHER

Walter Wood, minister of the parish, and a large part of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. A site was secured with difficulty, but materials to build a church were refused. Fortunately a bed of sand was found on the feu. A building, partly of wood, roofed with tarred canvas, was erected. This gave place in 1854 to a substantial stone and lime structure. The manse was built in 1845, and enlarged in 1872. Earlston and part of Legertwood were at first included in the Westruther district. Soon a station was formed in Earlston where a probationer officiated until, in 1864, the Home Mission grant was withdrawn. The congregation suffered through decline of the population. Let into the wall over the entrance to the church is a red sandstone slab commemorating John Veitch, minister of the parish 1649-1703, who, with his brother William, suffered as a Covenanter. On it is the following inscription, viz.:—”The people of Westruther again departing from their parish church because they cannot own other than Christ’s authority within Christ’s kingdom, and remembering the example of one who being dead yet speaketh, erected this stone in the year 1843.”

Membership

1848, 175;

1900, 101.

Ministers

Walter Wood, M.A., 1843-1845

James Izzet, 1846-1887

Robert Arthur, M.A., 1888 — .

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YETHOLM

This was the Original Secession congregation, which entered the Free Church in 1852. The old building was removed and a new church erected on the same site in 1882. The manse was rebuilt in 1862.

Membership

1859, 139;

1900, 206.

Ministers

John Hastie, 1852-1863

John Coventry, 1862-1869

Alexander Macmillan, 1869-1878

Norman Macpherson, 1878-1895

Alexander C. Hogg, 1895 — .

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8. PRESBYTERY OF JEDBURGH

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ANCRUM

From the Disruption the congregation here was maintained on the footing of a preaching station. A church was built in 1851, and a school was established. The charge was sanctioned in 1859. The church was enlarged in 1860, and a manse was built in 1864. From about 1870 decrease in the population told adversely on the membership.

Membership

1861, 148;

1900, 116.

Ministers

John M’Ewan, D.D., 1859-1863

Hugh M. Rattray, 1864 —

James Baikie, F.R.A.S., 1892 — .

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CRAILING

Andrew Milroy, minister of Crailing, “came out” at the Disruption. The church was built in 1843, and the manse in 1847. A new church, hall, and vestry were erected in 1900. The district being entirely rural, the congregation suffered through depopulation. The members were, for the most part, working people.

Membership

1848, 185;

1900, 142.

Ministers

Andrew Milroy, 1843-1844

T. S. Anderson, 1844-1896 [He retired in 1885, Vol.1.]

W. B. Hutton, M.A., 1885 — .

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DENHOLM

This congregation was formed in the autumn of 1843 by adherents of the Free Church from the parishes of Minto, Bedrule, and Cavers, in the last named of which Denholm is situated. The first minister was settled in 1844. The church was built in 1845, with an enclosed gallery which was used for a time as a school. The manse was built in 1849, and the Pitt Memorial Hall in 1893. The people were mainly quarrymen and stocking weavers. The quarries were closed, the weavers disappeared, and the population of Denholm greatly decreased.

Membership

1848, 155;

1900, 174.

Ministers

A. H. Cowan, 1844-1846

James M’Clymont, 1847-1886

Thomas Cooling Pitt, M.A., 1881-1892

John Smith, M.A., 1892 — .

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HAWICK

John Aikman Wallace, minister of Hawick, and the bulk of his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. Church and manse were completed in 1844. According to agreement, the church being opened free of debt, all sittings were free for many years. With the growth of the population came the necessity for church extension, and in 1866, 127 members were disjoined to form St. Andrew’s Free Church congregation. A mission was also undertaken, which developed into West Port Territorial Church.

Membership

1848, 700

1900, 647

Ministers

John A. Wallace, 1843-1870 [Vol.1 says he became senioe minister in 1858, retired in 1864 and died in 1870.]

W. H. Gualter, 1859-1864

John MacGrcgor, 1864-1873

M. P. Johnstone, 1873-1879

W. A. P. Johnman, M.A., 1880 — .

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HAWICK – ST. ANDREW’S

This congregation was formed in 1866 as the outcome of a movement to provide a new charge in Hawick, or Wilton. The charge was sanctioned in 1867. The church was built in 1870, and the manse in 1890.

Membership

1870, 231;

1900, 400.

Minister

Duncan Stewart, M.A., 1868 — .

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HAWICK – WEST PORT

The West Port congregation arose out of mission work begun and supported by James Douglas of Cavers. In 1857 it was taken over by Hawick Free Church. An old weaving shop at the head of the Fore Row was purchased and converted into a meeting-house. In 1863 it became a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1869. The church was built in 1876, and the manse in 1890. Church halls were erected in 1900.

Membership

1870, 142;

1900, 343.

Ministers

Richard Rose M’Queen, 1869-1872

Robert Fordyce, 1872-1893

A. Westwater, M.A., 1894 — .

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JEDBURGH

Dr. John Purves, minister of the parish, and a large congregation, “came out” in 1843. For about three months, while the church was being built, they worshipped in the assembly room of the Spread Eagle Hotel. The manse was erected in 1850; and a school was provided. While a new church was in process of erection, in 1854, the congregation enjoyed the hospitality of the High Street United Presbyterian congregation. Emigration to some extent adversely affected the congregation.

Membership

1848, 526;

1900, 384.

Ministers

John Purves, LL. D., 1843-1877

Richard Cameron, M.A., 1878 — .

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NEWCASTLETON

In 1850 certain persons formed themselves into a congregation here, and petitioned the Presbytery of Jedburgh to be recognised as a sanctioned charge. With the consent of all parties the Assembly of 1850 transferred Newcastleton from the Presbytery of Lockerbie to that of Jedburgh. It was then recognised as a station. A church was built in 1853, from plans prepared by J. B. Johnstone, minister of Wolflee. The foundation-stone was laid by James Nisbet, the well-known publisher, of Berners Street, London. A manse was built in 1857. It was burned down in 1891, and rebuilt in 1892.

Membership

1859, 92;

1900, 140.

Ministers

David Mackay, 1856-1860

Neil Shaw Ure, M.A., 1861-1875

John A. Smith, 1876-1898 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1898,]

Alexander Lowe, B.D., 1898 — .

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WOLFLEE

This congregation was formed by people who in the parishes of Hobkirk and Southdean “came out” in 1843. A church was built in 1844, in the Crown Wood, Wolflee. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. The manse was built in 1849. A new church was erected in 1867, near to the manse, the proprietor generously making an exchange of ground. The district is wholly pastoral, with a decreasing population. The church was at first known as Hobkirk and Southdean; when the charge was sanctioned it was called Wolflee.

Membership

1848, 86;

1900, 113.

Ministers

J. B. Johnstone, 1849-1862 [In Vol.1 his surname is Johnston.]

Robert Milligan, 1863-1871

W. C. Russell, 1872-1890

William Smith, 1891 (7th January to 28th February)

Robert Leggat, 1891-1898

D. W. Baird, 1898 — .

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9. PRESBYTERY OF SELKIRK

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ASHKIRK

John Edmonston, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. A church was forthwith erected; but owing to legal difficulties the manse was not built till 1859, and the minister meantime lived in houses first four, then seven miles from the church, and latterly in Selkirk. The proprietor of The Haining, on which estate church and manse were built, was exceedingly friendly. The church was thoroughly renovated in 1898. The population of the district greatly decreased after 1843.

Membership

1848, 45;

1900, 58.

Ministers

John Edmonston, 1843-1865 [Vol.1 says he died in 1895.]

Alexander Giles, M.A., 1866-1867 [Vol.1 doesn’t tell of his leaving here at all.]

W. F. Bell, M.A., 1897 — .

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BOWDEN

Thomas Jolly, minister of the parish, and nearly all his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. The church was built in 1843; and a house was bought and enlarged, to serve as a manse.

Membership

1848, 176;

1900, 113.

Ministers

Thomas Jolly, 1843-1859

James Pirie, B.D., 1857-1878

John Sinclair, D.D., 1879-1890

Homer Young, M.A., 1890-1894

N. G. Macarthur, M.A., 1894 — .

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ETTRICK

In 1843 occasional supply was arranged for Ettrick and Yarrow. Not till after the Union with the Reformed Presbyterians, in 1876, was Ettrick recognised as a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1880. Two churches, eight miles apart, and a manse were built.

Membership

1881, 95;

1900, 104.

Minister

R. Birkett, 1880 — .

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GALASHIELS

Theparish minister did not “come out” in 1843, but a Free Church congregation was formed at the Disruption. Supply was provided till April 1844, when the first minister was settled. The church was built in Market Square in 1844, and the manse in Abbotsford Road in 1848. A new church was erected at the foot of Lawyers Brae in 1875. Growth of the Tweed trade brought considerable expansion to the town after 1870.

Membership

1848, 200;

1900, 513.

Ministers

R. B. Nichol, 1844-1863

J. Selkirk, M.A., 1862-1873

W. Whyte Smith, B.D., 1873-1885

W. S. Matheson, M.A., 1885 — .

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LADHOPE

The minister of Ladhope quoad sacrachurch, and nearly all his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped for a time in the hall of a hotel. The church was built in Island Street, Galashiels, in 1844; and the manse in Buckholmside in 1848. A new church and halls were built in Bridge Street in 1885.

Membership

1848, 380;

1900, 473.

Ministers

W. P. Falconer, 1843-1845

James Adam, 1846-1849

James Fettes, 1850-1865

James Spence, 1866 —

Ivor J. Roberton, M.A., 1898 — .

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LAUDER

At the Disruption a Free Church congregation was formed here, under the Presbytery of Kelsoand Lauder. The district served included the parish of Channelkirk and the village of Blainslie; occasional services being held at Stow. The congregation worshipped for a time in an old school. The church was built and opened in December 1843. The manse was erected in 1847. In 1875 the congregation was transferred from the Presbytery of Kelso to that of Selkirk. The district is purely agricultural. The population greatly decreased.

Membership

1848, 240;

1900, 126.

Ministers

Thomas Waters, 1843-1876

John Mitchell, 1873-1882

Duncan Turner, 1882 — .

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MELROSE

The parish minister did not “come out” in 1843; but a Free Church congregation was formed here at the Disruption. A site was given free by Miss Douglas of Old Melrose—afterwards Mrs. Pringle Pattison—who laid the foundation-stone of the church. It was opened in November 1843. A school was provided in 1844. The manse was built in 1846. A new church was erected in 1852, and a new manse in 1883. The congregation was considerably reduced by the emigration of residents; a loss not counterbalanced by the influx of tourists and summer visitors. In the church are memorial windows to Sir David Brewster, Rev. William Cousin, Mrs. Cousin, authoress of “The Sands of Time,” and Miss Clephane, authoress of “There were ninety and nine.”

Membership

1848, 325;

1900, 251.

Ministers

A. J. Campbell, D.D., 1843-1859

William Cousin, 1859-1878 [Vol.1 became senior minister in 1878, died 1883]

Robert Sanders, B.D., 1878 — .

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SELKIRK

The congregation here was organised in 1843 by John Thomson, formerly minister of Shettleston. They worshipped at first in the Oddfellows’ Hall, and, in summer, under a great oak on The Haining estate. The church was built in 1844. Mrs. Douglas of The Haining, a member of the congregation, gifted the necessary timber, and Mr. Mitchell of Philiphaugh carted the material without charge. The manse was erected in 1848.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 348.

Ministers

William Sorley, 1843-1859

James Young, 1860-1873

William Steven, 1873 — .

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ST. BOSWELLS

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. For some months public worship was held in a barn on the Green. The church was built, and opened in July 1844. Flooring was added later. The farmers carted the stones; Miss Binnie, Dryburgh, presented the bell, and W. Smith of Riddleton Hill the organ, in memory of his wife. The feu was purchased with a legacy left by Miss Kay in 1881. The manse was built in 1854, and the vestry in 1862.

Membership

1848, 150;

1900, 192.

Ministers

John Duncan, 1843-1861

Alexander Terras, M.A., 1861 —

John U. Macgregor, M.A., 1894 — .

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STOW AND HERIOT

The minister of Stow remained in the Established Church in 1843. The minister of Heriot “came out,” but was at once transferred to Pathhead. Adherents of the Free Church from Stow and Heriot met for worship in an Inn at Galabank. Services, at first occasional, and then regular, were supplied under the Presbytery of Kelso and Lauder. A church was built in 1843. The site, secured from Mr. Murray of Craigend, was on ground that belonged to Cardinal Beaton, who, in 1540, granted a tack of the lands of Craigend to George Pringle of Torwoodlea. The manse was erected in 1843. The church was replaced by a new one on the same site in 1862. The charge, sanctioned in 1845, was, in 1847, transferred to the Presbytery of Dalkeith; and again, in 1866, to that of Selkirk. The district is largely pastoral.

Membership

1848, 72;

1900, 117.

Ministers

Robert Court, 1843

J. T. N. Brydon, 1846-1896

A. I. Burnside, 1881-1890

Thomas Blackwood, M.A., 1890 — .

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YARROW AND MEGGAT

After the Disruption the Presbyteries of Selkirk and Biggar and Peebles co-operated in providing services for the district of Yarrow, until, in 1844, a preacher was appointed. Church and manse were built at Yarrow Feus in 1845. In this year the charge was sanctioned, the district of Meggat being attached to it. This same year a church was erected at Cappercleuch, St. Mary’s Loch, in which services were conducted by the minister of Yarrow. Communion cups were presented for use in this church by the session of Free St. John’s (Dr. Guthrie’s), Edinburgh. The congregation of Yarrow suffered heavily through the erection of a charge in Ettrick, as many from that district were accustomed to come over the hill.

Membership

1848, 107;

1900, 63.

Ministers

Thomas M’Crindle, M.A., 1847-1885

Malcolm Carment, M.A., 1882 — .

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ROBERTON

In 1843 supply was granted to those who adhered to the Free Church in this parish. The church, on Chisholm estate, beside the Borthwick water, was built and opened in December of that year. Decline of the population brought a great decrease in the membership, and for many years it had a struggling existence. In 1852 it was reduced to the status of a preaching station. At first it belonged to the Presbytery of Selkirk, but in 1880 it was transferred to that of Jedburgh.

Membership

1848, 60;

1900, 32.

Minister

John Dow, 1845-1852.

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10. PRESBYTERY OF LOCKERBIE

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ANNAN

Those who had been associated with Dr. Duncan of Ruthwell in building Greenknowe quoad sacra church in town, “came out” in 1843. They left the building which had been erected by their own efforts, and it remained untenanted for many years. The first meeting was held the Sabbath after the Disruption in the ball-room of the Buck Hotel. The use of the Original Secession Church was secured for afternoon service, and for evening service every second Sabbath. Members came also from the parishes of Dornock and Cummertrecs, and from the quoad sacraparish of Brydekirk. Those from Brydekirk were afterwards divided between Annan and Ecclefechan. In 1847 the church was built. A rented house, subsequently purchased, was used as a manse. The church was renovated and a gallery introduced in 1883. A hall and church officer’s house were built in 1884, and a new manse was erected in 1899.

Membership

1848, 211;

1900, 340.

Ministers

James Mackenzie, M.A., 1845-1849 [Vol.1 and Vol.2 under Dalbeattie says he was translated here in 1844.]

James Gailey, 1850-1890

W. S. Peebles, 1888 — .

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CANONBIE

The Duke of Buccleuch, sole proprietor of the parish, at first absolutely refused a site to the Free Church people. After the Disruption they ventured to pitch a tent on a corner of moorland, but were interdicted at the instance of the Duke. From September 1843 till July 1844 the congregation met for worship on the public highway. The charge was sanctioned in December 1843. As the summer communion approached the Duke relented. “His Grace cannot bear,” wrote his factor, “that so holy an office should be desecrated by being unnecessarily celebrated by the side of the public highway.” By arrangement with the Duke, a tent was pitched in a gravel pit. Here the first minister was inducted, and here the people worshipped until the church was completed in 1851. Great influence was exercised to prevent the people from associating themselves with the Free Church; but in spite of this the cause enjoyed much popular goodwill. Membership decreased with decline of the population.

Membership

1848, 240;

1900, 171.

Ministers

George Innes, 1844-1847

Alexander W. Milne, 1848-1885

John S. Wilson, M.A., 1885-1892

John Jamieson, M.A., 1892 — .

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ECCLEFECHAN

After the Disruption regular supply was arranged for the adherents of the Free Church here, provision for a preacher for a year having been offered by a private family. Some who thought to join the Free Church sought guidance from the parish minister. “The movement is right,” he said, “but it goes too far.” “Too much of right,” they replied, “could not be,” and they followed their convictions. By the month of October 1843, from 500 to 800 were attending the services. A wooden church was erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. A stone church and manse were built. At a later time a new church, with vestry and hall, was erected on the site of the second.

Membership

1848, 160;

1900, 163.

Ministers

John Matheson, 1845-1861

Andrew Inglis, 1861-1867

J. Glendinning, 1868-1872

William Howie, 1873 — .

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ESKDALEMUIR

This was originally a Reformed Presbyterian congregation. It united with the Free Church in 1876. The church was built in 1836 at Davington, about four miles from the parish church. The use of it was sought for occasional service in connection with the Free Church for a short time after the Disruption. The manse was built in 1848. The church was renovated in 1882.

Membership

1877, 38;

1900, 43.

Ministers

James Morrison, 1876-1878

John T. Falside, 1879 — .

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HALF-MORTON AND GRETNA

The minister of Half-Morton parish “came out” in 1843. For a time he had to reside in Annan, ten miles off. The church and manse were built in 1843-44. In 1846 work was begun at Gretna. On the settlement of a minister at Half-Morton in 1849 the Assembly placed the parish of Gretna also under his charge. From 1856 a regular mission was conducted at Gretna. The church at Gretna was built in 1894.

Membership

1848, 110;

1900, 141.

Ministers

W. B. Clark, D.D., 1843-1844

Walter Smith, 1844-1848

J. C. Paterson, 1849-1856

Walter Smith (second pastorate), 1856-1890

David Eaglesham, M.A.,1890 — .

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JOHNSTONE AND WAMPHRAY

InAugust 1843 supply was arranged for the adherents of the Free Church in this district. The charge was sanctioned in 1844. The first minister was ordained in the open air, on the bank of the river Annan. The congregation worshipped in tents and barns, until, finally, a site was secured, and church and manse were built in 1846.

Membership

1848, 250;

1900, 207.

Ministers

PeterHope, B.D.,1844-1870

John MacQueen, M.A., 1870-1877

Robert Murdoch, 1877-1889

James Barr, B.D., 1889-1896

John Young, M.A., 1896 — .

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KIRKMICHAEL

The congregation here, having been fostered by the church at Lochmaben, was placed on the footing of a preaching station in 1848. For fourteen years public worship was conducted in a wooden shed. A site having been at length obtained, a church was built in 1862. The charge was sanctioned in 1872, but was again reduced to a preaching station in 1885.

Membership

1873, 83;

1900, 51.

Minister

John Geddes, 1872-1885.

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KIRKPATRICK-FLEMING

Theminister of the parish and a large part of his congregation “came out” in 1843. Many people, formerly careless, seem then to have begun regular attendance on ordinances. The church was built in 1843; the manse and school in 1847. The school was afterwards made over to the proprietor.

Membership

1848, 160;

1900, 160.

Ministers

George Hastie, 1843-1856

George Mills, M.A.,1857-1886

George Donaldson, 1887 — .

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LANGHOLM

Thiscongregation dates from the Disruption. Its inception was due largely to Robert Smellie, who is still (1900) active in Church work. A small wooden structure served at first as a place of worship. Church and manse were built in 1845; the church bearing the inscription, “Free Protesting Church.” Later, a new manse was built. The membership fluctuated with the population of the town.

Membership

1848, 140;

1900, 216.

Ministers

Alexander Johnstone Ross, 1844-1847

Charles Watson, D.D., 1848-1864

John Davidson, 1864-1870

James Ewing Somerville, B.D,1870-1875

David Sievewright Smith, M.A., 1876-1878

James Panton, 1879-1900.

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LOCHMABEN

The adherents of the Free Church in Lochmaben were formed into a congregation on June 18, 1843. The church was built and opened in December of that year. A few years later the manse was acquired. The school, afterwards used as a hall, was built in 1845. In 1848, by the efforts of this congregation, a new congregation was formed at Kirkmichael. The formation of congregations here, at Dalton, and at Wamphray, reduced the area from which members at Lochmaben were drawn. The church also suffered from decline of the population.

Membership

1848, 500;

1900, 275.

Ministers

Hugh M’Bryde Broun, 1843-1866

Ebenezer Brown Hill, B.A., 1863-1883

John C. Barry, M.A., 1884-1888

William S. Swanson, M.A., 1888-1894

Homer Young, M.A., 1894-1898

Albert G. T. M’Kinnon, M.A., 1899 — .

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LOCKERBIE

David Buchan Douie, minister of the parish, with a large congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were erected that year. A hall was added at a later date. Subsequently a dwelling-house was purchased and used as a manse.

Membership

1848, 440;

1900, 397.

Ministers

David Buchan Douie, M.A., 1843 (May-December)

Thomas G. Duncan, 1844-1850

D. M’Kinnon, 1851-1859

A. D. Campbell, 1860-1892

J. D. M’Gilp, M.A., 1892 — .

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MOFFAT

This congregation was formed in August 1843. A church was built and opened in July 1844. The manse was erected in 1850, and enlarged in 1884. A new church was built in 1892. The stained-glass window in this church commemorates Dr. Welsh, Moderator of the Disruption Assembly of the Church of Scotland, a native of the parish. From about 1870, with the growth of the town, there was an increase of membership. After 1885 the members coming from the country became fewer.

Membership

1848, 401;

1900, 343.

Ministers

Robert Kinnear, 1843-1883

Kenneth Moody Stuart, M.A., 1868 — .

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