Congregations 15


 

71. PRESBYTERY OF SKYE

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BRACADALE

The minister of Bracadale, with his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. He was immediately translated to Musselburgh, but another minister was settled in December 1843. Steps were taken for the building of a new church in the end of 1854.

Membership

1855, 400 (including adherents);

1900, 20.

Ministers

J. R. Glass, 1843

John Finlayson, 1843-1844

John Fletcher, 1849-1876

James Ross, 1877-1892

Duncan Fraser, 1892 — .

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DUIRINISH

In December 1843 a catechist was appointed to care for the adherents of the Free Church in this parish. The charge was sanctioned in 1850, and a minister was settled in 1852. Church and manse, erected shortly after the Disruption, were, later, altered and renovated.

Membership

1855, 800 (including adherents);

1900, 109.

Ministers

Alexander M’Coll, 1852-1870

John M’Rae, 1871 — [Under Carinish it says he was translated in 1873.]

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KILMUIR AND STAFFIN

The people who formed the Free Church congregation here were the fruit of a revival movement, conducted by blind Donald Munro, which began at Kilmuir about 1812. They separated from the Established Church, and ultimately in a body joined the Free Church. For about twenty years after the Disruption services were held for them by probationers and catechists under the oversight of Roderick M’Leod of Snizort. Church and manse were erected, and a minister was settled in Kilmuir in 1864. The people of Eastside had to worship usually on the hillside until 1875, when a church was erected there. The population of this purely crofting parish numbered over 2000, the great body of them adhering to the Free Church.

Membership

1860, 500 (including adherents);

1900, 165.

Ministers

Christopher Munro, 1864-1870

J. S. Macphail, 1873-1887

Donald Alexander MacDonald, 1888 — .

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PORTREE

The minister of the parish did not “come out” in 1843, but almost all the congregation adhered to the Free Church. Elders were ordained immediately after the Disruption. The charge was sanctioned in 1849, and a minister was settled in December of that year. The church, completed in 1854, was erected and presented to the congregation by Miss Louisa Macdonald of Brighton, in memory of her father, the Right Hon. Sir Archibald Macdonald. The people also contributed to some extent towards the building. The manse was built in 1857. Several members seceded because of the Declaratory Act in 1892. The donor and her father are commemorated by a brass plate, with inscription, in the wall of the church.

Membership

1855, 450 (including adherents);

1900, 58.

Ministers

D. S. M’Eachran, 1849-1851

James Reid, 1854-1896

Norman M’Leod, M.A., 1894 — .

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RAASAY (part of the parish of Portree)

After the Disruption this island, on which a church was built, was for several years under the care of probationers and catechists. With the proprietor’s assistance, the congregation found themselves in a position to maintain an ordained minister. The charge was sanctioned in 1851, and a minister was settled in November of that year.

Membership

1855, 215 (including adherents);

1900, 20.

Ministers

W. S. Macdougall, 1851-1855

James Kippen, 1857-1867

Angus Galbraith, 1867-1890

D. Macfarlane, 1893 (April 27 to August 22)

John Macdonald, 1895 — .

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SLEAT

Those adhering to the Free Church in 1843 formed the congregation in Sleat, and elders were ordained in July of that year. The failure of a call addressed to a minister in 1844 made the situation somewhat uncertain, and some time elapsed before further action could be taken. At length in 1853 a satisfactory settlement was obtained. Steps were taken to build a church in 1855.

Membership

1855, 200 (including adherents);

1900, 40.

Ministers

John S. Macphail, 1853-1873

Finlay Graham, 1874-1885

William Fraser, 1886-1900.

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SMALL ISLES

The minister of this parish, comprising the four inhabited islands, Eigg, Rum, Canna, and Muck, “came out” in 1843. The population of the group was about 1000, nearly half of whom were Roman Catholics. There was no church building on the islands. No site could be got on Eigg. The adherents were few, and when the minister was translated in 1847, the congregation was reduced to a preaching station.

Minister

John Swanson, 1843-1847 [Under Nigg it says he was translated 1846.]

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SNIZORT

Roderick MacLeod, minister of Snizort, and almost all his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Mr. MacLeod’s district was 30 miles in length. Besides the church he had two regular meeting-places, one twelve miles distant, the other eight. For some years the congregation worshipped in the open air. A church and manse and schoolhouse were built at Snizort; and a church at Uig, at the other end of the parish. All were completed in 1847. With the exception of two or three families, all the people were crofters.

Membership

1855, 1200 (including adherents);

1900, 80.

Ministers

Roderick MacLeod, M.A., 1843-1868

Joseph Lamont, 1869 — .

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STRATH

After the Disruption this district was served by catechists. By the efforts of John S. Macphail of Sleat, a preaching station was organised. In 1857 the charge was sanctioned. In 1850 the parish was described as 27 miles long by 7 broad, with seven separate groups of population, and “without exception the most neglected portion of the Church.” Strathaird Church was built about 1845; Broadford manse in 1869; Broadford Church in 1878; Kyleakin Church in 1897; Elgol mission hall in 1899; and Dunan mission hall in the same year.

Membership

1861, 200 (including adherents);

1900, 44.

Ministers

Alexander Mackenzie, 1864-1878

Alexander Grant, 1880 — .

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72. PRESBYTERY OF UIST

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BENBECULA

In the years following the Disruption there were many adherents of the Free Church in Benbecula, especially among the young people. Numbers of these had emigrated by 1851. In 1854 Benbecula was united with Carinish and Lochmaddy under one minister. It was sanctioned as a separate charge in 1885. Church and manse had already been built. In a population of 1500 to 2000, about a half were Roman Catholics, the other half being nearly equally divided between the Established and Free Churches. There was an endowment of £100, raised by the exertions of Principal Rainy.

Membership

1887, 218 (including adherents);

1900, 63.

Minister

John S. Macphail, 1887 — .

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BERNERA, ETC.

From the Disruption until 1858 the island of Bernera was under the care of Mr. MacLeod of North Uist. It was supplied by catechists until 1864, when it was made a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1885. Church and manse were built in 1887, and opened free of debt, through the instrumentality of Principal Rainy. The population was stated in 1847 as 1000, mostly extremely poor, and in 1885, at 700, all adhering to the Free Church. The nearest Free church was 24 miles distant.

Membership

1886, 23;

1900, 49.

Minister

Murdoch Morrison, 1888 — .

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CARINISH

Carinish was combined with North Uist when the latter charge was sanctioned in 1849. In 1854 it was disjoined from North Uist, and united in one charge with Benbecula and Lochmaddy. It was sanctioned as a separate charge in 1869. The parish, 20 miles long by 12 broad, is much broken up by arms of the sea. It includes Lochmaddy and the island of Grimsay. The population, mostly crofters, in 1855 numbered 1512, of whom 674 adhered to the Free Church. Church and manse were built at Clachan in 1890, and a mission hall and missionary’s dwelling at Lochmaddy about 1891.

Membership

1866, 300 (including adherents);

1900, 56.

Ministers

John M’Rae, 1869-1873 [Vol.1 and under Duirinish says he moved in 1871.]

Donald M’Lean, 1873-1892

A. M. M’Alpine, 1893-1897

Ewen Gillies, 1897 — .

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HARRIS

In 1845 a catechist was placed in Harris. The population, in 1847, was stated at 4000, practically all adhering to the Free Church. In 1848 it was seen that two charges were required in the island. A church was erected at Manish, and the charge there was sanctioned under the name of Harris in 1849. The other charge was at Tarbert (which see).

Membership

1855, 200 (including adherents);

1900, 30.

Ministers

Alexander Davidson, 1852-1892

Farquhar Kennedy, M.A., 1896 — .

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NORTH UIST

Norman MacLeod, minister of Trumisgarry Parliamentary Church, in the parish of North Uist, “came out” in 1843, and for some years had charge of almost the whole of the long island, the remainder being served by a catechist. The charge was sanctioned in 1849. North Uist and Trumisgarry were united in one charge in 1854, under Mr. MacLeod. Church and manse were erected in 1858, and the mission house at Sollas in 1893.

Membership

1859, 400 (including adherents);

1900, 64.

Ministers

Norman MacLeod, 1843-1881

William M’Kinnon, 1884-1891

John MacLeod, 1892 — [Vol.1 says 1890.]

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TARBERT, HARRIS

The congregation was formed here in 1848, when the district was divided. Church and manse were built about 1860, in which year the charge was sanctioned. The congregation entered the Union unbroken in 1900.

Membership

1863, 900 (including adherents);

1900, 251.

Ministers

M. Mackay, LL. D., 1862-1873 [Vol.1 says he retired in 1868 and died in 1873.]

Roderick Mackenzie, M.A., 1868-1884

John M’Lean, 1885-1900

Nicol Campbell, 1897 — .

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SOUTH UIST

In December 1843 a probationer was appointed to the charge of South Uist and Barra. In a population of 4338, the great majority of whom were Roman Catholics, the adherents of the Free Church in 1855 numbered 375. For twenty years after the Disruption no site could be obtained. The church was built in 1863. The charge was sanctioned in 1864. The manse was completed in 1880. The long unsettled period, the extended vacancy between the first and second ministers, and the prevailingly Romanist character of the population made progress difficult.

Membership

1868, 28;

1900, 55.

Ministers

Roderick Ross, 1869-1874

Donald John Nicolson, 1880 — .

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BARRA [station]

Barra was at first united in a single charge with South Uist, and was visited by the minister about once a month. The crossing, which had to be effected in a small sailing boat, was dangerous; and, except in good weather, it was impossible. In 1888 Barra was erected into a station, with twelve members and about eighty adherents. There were three meeting-places—the old thatched house where a school was at first conducted by a ladies’ teacher; the new school or mission house at North Bay, built before 1870 and several times repaired; and the wooden church built specially for the fishermen at Castle Bay.

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ST. KILDA [station]

The mission charge at St. Kilda, which owed its existence to Dr. MacDonald of Ferintosh, fell vacant at the Disruption. Visited by a Free Church deputy in 1846, all the inhabitants, numbering 103, declared their adherence to the Free Church. Deputies occasionally visited the island, but no agent was stationed there, and the proprietor refused the use of the church. In 1859 an Admiralty officer connected with the district called the attention of the Highland Committee to the state of the island. A catechist was appointed, who resigned in 1863. In 1865, with the Assembly’s sanction, in response to a request of the people, a probationer was ordained as missionary in the island.

Membership

1880, 100 (including adherents);

1900, 20.

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73. PRESBYTERY OF LEWIS

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BACK

In answer to a petition from the people, a catechist was stationed here in 1843. In 1845, when 1700 adherents were reported, the charge was sanctioned, it being understood that, meantime, there should be only one minister and one catechist taking charge of both Back and Barvas. Disharmony among the people and backwardness in supporting the Sustentation Fund delayed the settlement of a minister till 1859. The manse was built in 1858. The majority of the people did not enter the Union in 1900.

Membership

1859, 300 (including adherents);

1900, 1169 (including adherents).

Ministers

D. Macmaster, 1859-1876

John MacLean, 1877-1880

Hector Cameron, 1881 — .

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BARVAS

At the instance of the adherents of the Free Church a congregation was formed here, and a kirk session appointed. The charge was sanctioned in 1845, the understanding being that Barvas and Back together should be served by one minister and one catechist. Almost the whole population, numbering about 2000, then belonged to the Free Church. The church was built about 1850, and the manse a few years later.

Membership

1859, 550 (including adherents);

1900, 920 (including adherents).

Ministers

Allan MacArthur, 1857-1887

N. M. Morrison, 1888 — .

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CARLOWAY

With few exceptions, the people of the north side of Lewis adhered to the Free Church in 1843. Before the Disruption Carloway formed part of the congregation of Lochs, 30 miles distant. In 1844, on petition from the residents, the charge of Carloway and Callernish was sanctioned. It continued, however, in charge of a catechist till 1858. The population of Carloway, Callernish, and Shawbost numbered about 3000. In 1846 a church was erected on a central site at Knock, Carloway, the people contributing sand and stones for the building. A manse was built in 1859. In this year the district was visited by a memorable revival. In 1884 a new church was built on the old site, the people again contributing sand and stones. Some families at Breasclet joined the Free Presbyterians in 1892. The majority of the congregation did not enter the Union in 1900.

Membership

1859, 550 (including adherents);

1900, 860 (including adherents).

Ministers

John M’Lean, 1858-1863

Roderick Ross, 1874 (July-December)

Roderick Macrae, 1876 — .

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CROSS OR NESS

The minister and congregation of the Parliamentary Church at Cross “came out” at the Disruption. From 1843 to 1846 they worshipped in the open air. In the latter year church and manse were built at South Dell. In those days much driftwood was cast ashore. The Marquis of Breadalbane bought it to help in building the church. With the growth of the population the congregation greatly increased. A new church was built in 1891. The first minister would baptize none but children of Church members in full communion. The great body of the young were unbaptized when Mr. M’Rae was ordained.

Membership

1855, 680 (including adherents);

1900, 1453 (including adherents).

Ministers

John Finlayson, 1843 (May-September)

Donald M’Rae, 1844-1876

D. Macbeath, 1879-1891

D. M. Macdonald, M.A., 1893 — .

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KINLOCH

In 1881 this section of Lochs congregation was formed into a station, and a church was erected. In 1885 it was sanctioned as a Church Extension charge. A manse was built, chiefly through the efforts of Mrs. Macdonald, in 1895. The number of communicants, from 1883 onwards, was about 140, representing one for every six adherents—a larger proportion than usually obtains.

Membership

1883, 820 (including adherents);

1900, 565 (including adherents).

Ministers

John Macdonald, 1885-1896

John Mackay, 1896 — .

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KNOCK

The minister and congregation of this Parliamentary Church in the parish of Stornoway “came out” at the Disruption. Church and manse were built in 1845. A new and larger church was built in 1882, and a new manse in 1892. About two-thirds of the congregation did not enter the Union in 1900.

Membership

1855, 800 (including adherents);

1900, 1700 (including adherents).

Ministers

Duncan Matheson, 1843-1844

Donald Murray, 1845-1866

M. MacRitchie, 1869-1885

George MacLeod, 1886 — .

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LOCHS

Robert Finlayson, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843, his congregation following him. Church and manse were soon erected. The situation, however, was unsuitable, moors and arms of the sea making access difficult for many. Some years later a new church was erected on a more convenient site. The majority of the congregation declined to enter the Union in 1900.

Membership

1855, 700 (including adherents);

1900, 643 (including adherents).

Ministers

Robert Finlayson, 1843-1856

John M’Rae, 1857-1864

G. L. Campbell, 1865-1875

Hector Cameron, 1876-1881

John MacDougall, 1885 — .

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PARK

At this station in the parish of Lochs regular services were begun in October 1878, and the charge was sanctioned in 1879. A church was provided.

Membership

1879, 594 (including adherents);

1900, 565 (including adherents).

Ministers

N. M. Morrison, 1886-1888

Hector Kennedy, 1889 — .

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SHAWBOST

Soon after the Disruption a school was opened at Shawbost, and occasional services were held. In 1893 it was made a preaching station, and a church was erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1894.

Membership

1894, 980 (including adherents).

Minister

G. L. Campbell, 1895 — .

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STORNOWAY

In response to a request from the adherents of the Free Church a session was organised here, and the charge was sanctioned in 1844. A church was soon erected, with double roof, felt-covered and pitch-coated. It was burned down in 1850, and rebuilt, with improvements. After enlargement and extensive repairs it was reopened in June 1894. The manse was built in 1850. In 1858 a few families seceded and formed the United Presbyterian congregation. In 1875 about 300 members withdrew to form the English congregation. In 1892 some hundreds seceded to the Free Presbyterians, and in 1900 a section declined to enter the Union. Withal the congregation still remained over 1300 strong.

Membership

1855, 650 (including adherents);

1900, 1450 (including adherents).

Ministers

Duncan Macgregor, M.A., 1849-1854

Peter M’Lean, 1855-1868

James Greenfield, 1872 — [Vol.1 says he died in 1899.]

Peter MacDonald, M.A., 1895 — .

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STORNOWAY – ENGLISH

In 1874 a petition, signed by 202 persons, asked the Presbytery of Lewis to form a second charge in Stornoway, which should be English, because of the large population of the town and district, amounting to over 4000, the increase in the number of English-speaking inhabitants, and the great influx of English-speaking people at fishing seasons. A church was built, and the charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1876.

Membership

1877, 214;

1900, 190.

Ministers

D. J. Martin, M.A., 1876-1897

John S. Macdonald, M.A., 1897 — .

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UIG

Alexander MacLeod, minister of the parish, and his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. The church and manse were built in 1844-45.

Membership

1855, 700 (including adherents);

1900, 693 (including adherents).

Ministers

Alexander MacLeod, 1843 (May-November)

John Campbell, 1846-1885

Duncan Morrison, 1879-1887

Nicol Campbell, 1889-1897

Donald Macarthur, 1899 — .

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74. PRESBYTERY OF ORKNEY

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BIRSAY

Almost the whole congregation “came out” in 1843, the minister and only one of the elders remaining behind. John Garson, formerly assistant to the minister, was appointed to supply. A church was built and opened in November 1843, and the manse in 1845. A new church was built in 1874. The Original Secession congregation in the parish united with the Free Church in 1852, but, owing to a dispute as to the property, the minister found it necessary to resign, and the congregation was dissolved in 1854.

Membership

1848, 341;

1900, 407.

Ministers

John Garson, 1844-1884

John A. Selbie, D.D., 1882-1896

Charles Meldrum, M.A., 1896 — .

Original Secession.

Minister

Robert Auld, 1852-1854.

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DEERNESS

The minister of Deerness Parliamentary Church, in the parish of St. Andrews, did not “come out” in 1843. The Free Church adherents, led by William Tulloch, schoolmaster, formed a congregation, under the care of the minister of St. Andrews, who adhered to the Free Church. A church and school were built in 1844, and the charge was sanctioned in 1846. The manse was erected in 1850. In 1851 an unsuccessful attempt was made to unite this congregation with that of St. Andrews. As there was no Secession church in the parish, the congregation of Deerness was strengthened by the members of that body.

Membership

1848, 243;

1900, 250.

Ministers

Andrew Smellie, 1846-1851

W. D. Robb, M.A., 1853 —

James Whyte, B.D., 1897 — .

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EVIE AND RENDALL

The minister, and the great majority of the people in the united parishes of Evie and Rendall, “came out” in 1843. The churches at Evie and Rcndall were built in 1844, the manse in 1846, the school at Evie in 1847, and the school at Rendall in 1848. A new church at Evie was erected in 1886, and Costa district hall in 1894. The district suffered much from emigration. During a revival in 1898, 100 persons publicly professed conversion, and 32 young communicants were added to the roll.

Membership

1848, 407;

1900, 294.

Ministers

Adam Rettie, M.A., 1843-1875

Alexander M’Gregor Rose, 1875-1879

[Vol.1 says Alexander Whyte was in Rendall 1878-1883, but this doesn’t seem to fit.]

George Home, M.A., 1880-1887

James Roy, B.D., 1888 — .

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FIRTH AND STENNIS

William Malcolm, minister of Firth, “came out” in 1843, and a church was erected that year. The minister at the same time built a manse, which was purchased by the congregation at his death in 1857. A new church was built on an adjacent site in 1870, the people contributing much free labour. The charge was reduced to a station in 1857, but resanctioncd in 1860. At the Disruption the parochial teacher, Samuel Houston, “came out,” and lost his position; but a school and house were soon built for him on the lands of Benaferry. In 1872 the school was transferred to the School Board, and the buildings were sold to the proprietor. Stennis was disjoined from, Firth at the Disruption. A church was at once built, and the charge was sanctioned in 1844. On the minister’s removal in 1864, it was reduced to a station, and an unsuccessful attempt was made to reunite it with Firth.

Firth:Membership

1848, 191;

1900, 153.

Ministers

William Malcolm, M.A., 1843-1857

F. Souter, M.A., 1860-1862

James Roy, B.D., 1862-1880

John Jamieson, M.A., 1880- 1892

D. A. Maclaren, B.D., 1893 — .

Stennis: Membership

1848, 180.

Minister

A. W. Riddoch, 1844-1864.

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HARRAY AND SANDWICK

The minister of the united parishes of Birsay and Harray was in sympathy with the Non-Intrusionists, and his influence told on their side, but, being old and infirm, he did not “come out” in 1843. The Free Church adherents formed a congregation, and the first minister was settled in December 1843. The church and manse were built immediately after the Disruption, and the school and schoolhouse about 1847. The church was rebuilt on the same site in 1874. Emigration adversely affected the membership.

Membership

1848, 286;

1900, 192.

Ministers

Adam White, M.A., 1843-1873

John R. Anderson, M.A., 1874 — .

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HOLM

This congregation was an offshoot from the United Presbyterian church in the district. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1869. The church was built in 1866, and the manse in 1873. There was no room for expansion in the parish, and latterly the congregation suffered through emigration.

Membership

1870, 181;

1900, 165.

Minister

Daniel M’Neil, M.D., L.R.F.P.S.G., 1869 — . [In Vol.1 his surname is spelled with a double l.]

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KIRKWALL

Peter Petrie, minister of the second charge in the parish, “came out” in 1843, with a large proportion of his people. The congregation continued to use the church until it was claimed by the Established Church in 1847. In 1852 the Original Secession congregation joined the Free Church. At the end of the year, on the minister’s retirement, the two congregations were united.

Membership

1848, 415;

1900, 399.

Ministers

Peter Petrie, M.A., 1843-1844

William Sinclair, 1845-1874

James Stuart, 1868-1883

Alexander Isdale, B.D., 1883-1899

David Tripney, M.A., 1899 — .

Original Secession:

Minister

David Walker, 1843-1853 [Only in the Free Church since 1852 – indeed, he was only settled there in 1850 according to Vol.1.]

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ORPHIR

Immediately after the Disruption supply was arranged for the Free Church adherents at Orphir. The church was built in 1843-44, and the manse in 1845-46. The charge was sanctioned in 1844. A new church was erected in 1885-86.

Membership

1848, 231;

1900, 214.

Ministers

Archibald Duncan, 1844-1872

William Omand, 1872-1880

David Gillies, 1880 — .

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PAPA-WESTRAY

The Free Church adherents at Papa-Westray and Westray, among whom were the local proprietor and his family, were formed into a congregation after the Disruption, under charge of a probationer. The charge was sanctioned in September 1843. A church, large enough for the whole population of the island, had been built by the proprietor’s family in 1841. It was shut up, however, till the Disruption, and made over to the Free Church at first Assembly. The proprietor also helped in the building of the manse. At the first vacancy it was questioned whether the charge should be continued. The Assembly of 1856 sanctioned its continuance. It was stated that of more than 300 people in the island, almost all attended the Free Church. Westray became a separate station in 1877.

Membership

1848, 112;

1900, 115.

Ministers

W. S. Login, 1844-1853

John Peddie, 1856-1883

George Cochrane, 1884-1890

Matthew Armour, jr., 1891 — .

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RONALDSHAY – NORTH

Adam White, minister of North Ronaldshay Parliamentary Church, and the majority of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The building of the church, begun in 1845, and of the manse, begun in 1848, was completed in 1852. The factor’s hostility, and emigration, adversely affected the congregation during 1849-50. The share taken by the Free Church in agitating for the Crofters Act of 1886 gave a stimulus to the congregation, but it suffered from the destruction of the inshore cod fishery, of which this island was an important centre. The isolation of the island exercises a depressing influence. Wrecks used to be frequent on the shore. The rafters of the manse were made of timber from a shipwreck, in the purchase of which the hostile factor was cleverly outwitted.

Membership

1848, 170;

1900, 146.

Ministers

Adam White, 1843

Robert Wilson, M.A., 1846-1877 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1877 and died in 1894.]

Alexander Grant, 1877-1883

James Cheyne, M.A., 1883-1891

William Macpherson, B.D., 1891 — .

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RONALDSHAY – SOUTH

In response to a petition from some of the leading men in the South parish a station was formed here in 1870. For some years services were held in Tomison School by a probationer. In 1875 the charge was sanctioned. The church was built in 1873, and the manse in 1878. In its early years the church owed much to the enterprise and liberality of James Thomson of Quoys. He continued to collect for the Sustentation Fund until he was eighty years of age.

Membership

1876, 80;

1900, 119.

Ministers

Robert Kay, 1876-1878

Alexander Goodfellow, 1878 — .

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ROUSAY AND EGILSHAY

George Ritchie, minister of Rousay, “came out” in 1843. A considerable congregation was at once formed, and church and manse were erected. The population of the island greatly declined. The island of Egilshay was under charge of the minister of Rousay.

Membership

1848, 208;

1900, 155.

Ministers

George Ritchie, M.A., 1843-1858

Neil P. Rose, M.A., 1859-1880

Archibald M’Callum, 1880-1889

Robert Bonellie, 1889-1894

John M’Leman, 1894 — .

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ST. ANDREWS

James Smellie, minister of St. Andrews, and a large portion of the people, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were soon erected. The church was rebuilt in 1886.

Membership

1848, 149;

1900, 117.

Ministers

James Smellie, 1843-1852

Archibald Smellie, 1853-1857

John Stewart, F.E.I.S., 1857-1891 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1891.]

James Cheyne, M.A., 1891 — .

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SANDAY

At the request of a number of the inhabitants of the island a congregation was formed here shortly after the Disruption, and a minister was settled in July 1843. At a later time a large section of the members left the church, and formed a mission station. Under Mr. Armour’s ministry a revival movement began which spread over all the islands.

Membership

1848, 420;

1900, 168.

Ministers

Alexander Urquhart, 1843-1845

Matthew Armour, 1848 — .

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STROMNESS

Peter Learmonth, minister of Stromness, and a congregation of 600, “came out” in 1843. For two Sabbaths they worshipped in the open air, on Miller’s Pier, and then in a large store called “the warehouse,” till the church was ready for occupation, in 1844. The manse was built in 1865. A new church was erected on the old site, and opened in 1892. The membership fell with the decline of the population in town and country. For many years the Free Church school was the chief educational centre in the town.

Membership

1848, 550;

1900, 396.

Ministers

Peter Learmonth, 1843-1858

James Ritchie, 1857-1899

John Dykes Lang, 1884-1896

James Christie, M.A., 1896 — .

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75. PRESBYTERY OF SHETLAND

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CUNNINGSBURGH

The great majority of the people in the district adhered to the Free Church in 1843. Church and manse were erected in 1844. The church was designed to serve a wide district under Alexander Stark, minister of Sandwick, who “came out” at the Disruption. In 1889 the Sandwick Independent congregation was received into the Free Church as a mission station, and their church building was purchased. In August 1900 Cunningsburgh and Sandwick were united.

Membership

1855, 200;

1900, 296.

Ministers

Alexander Stark, M.A., 1843-1844

George Turnbull, 1846-1859

Frederick Souter, 1862-1875

George Clark, 1875 — .

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DELTING

For a time services were held by probationers in different places in the parish. The kirk session was constituted in October 1846. That year the church was built and opened. The manse was erected in 1851. The church was altered and reduced in size in 1888. The population declined with the failure of the ling and cod fishing, which began about 1870. The young men went off as sailors, the families depending more and more upon their crofts, and the knitting work done by the women.

Membership

1848, 80;

1900, 183.

Ministers

James Bain, 1846-1879

J. D. Rogers, 1874 — .

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DUNROSSNESS

Soon after the Disruption a preaching station was formed here. After several applications by the Presbytery, the charge was sanctioned in 1866. For a time the congregation worshipped in the school at Quendale, and other halls in the district. Then church and manse were built, free sites being given by the Griersons of Quendale, the people also contributing much free labour.

Membership

1868, 106

1900, 105

Ministers

Alexander Martin, 1866 — [Vol.1 says he retired in 1892.]

Charles Whyte, 1892 — .

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FETLAR

In 1843 a congregation was formed here with the status of a preaching station, under the care of John Ingram, minister of Unst. To him and to Gilbert Smith of Smithfield, in early days, the congregation was greatly indebted for help and guidance. They met for worship in Smithfield House until the church was opened in 1846. The charge was sanctioned in 1848, under condition that it be united with Yell. The Presbytery could not entertain this condition, and no settlement was made. In 1854 Fetlar was again reduced to a preaching station. Finally, in 1866, the charge was sanctioned. The manse was built in 1868. Decline of the population owing to failure of the white fishing, and the absence of local industries, told adversely on the congregation. Most of the lads went to sea, and the girls to domestic service. Men and women went to Lerwick and other places for work connected with herring fishing.

Membership

1868, 128;

1900, 92.

Ministers

James Doull, 1866-1872

J. J. Dishington Smith, 1873-1892

Ronald Stuart M’Affer, 1892 — .

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LERWICK (ST. OLAF’S)

In 1845 a ministerial charge was constituted here in response to a request from the people. The congregation worshipped for four years in a hall. The church was built in 1848-49.

Membership

1848,100;

1900, 240.

Ministers

D. Fraser, M.A., 1846-1872 [Under Scone, it says that he was translated from here in 1847.]

J. C. Robertson, 1873-1876

A. B. Brown, M.A., 1877-l88l

William Rogerson, 1881-1894

David Houston, M.A., 1894 — .

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QUARFF AND BURRA

James Gardner, minister of Bressay, Quarff, and Burra, “came out” in 1843. A church was built in Burra but iat Quarff Mr. Gardner conducted services on the green. He had to reside in Lerwick 6 miles from Quarff and 12 from Burra. With the scanty population, the Free Church congregation was small. Mr. Gardner resigned in 1849, and the charge was reduced to a preaching station. A mission hall was erected at Quarff in 1850; and in 1865 the church in Burra was made over to the United Presbyterian congregation there.

Membership

1848, 33.

Minister

James Gardner, M.A., 1843-1849.

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SANDWICK. See Cunningsburgh.

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UNST – HILLSIDE

Dr. James and John Ingram, his son and colleague, ministers of Unst, “came out” in 1843. That year the sheriff on petition by the principal heritor in the island, granted interdict against Dr. Ingram using the parish church for meetings, and causing the bell to be rung convening such meetings. In the petition, stress was laid on his “mistaken views,” perilous alike to the peace of the
country and the cause of religion, raising prejudice in the minds of the parishioners “against the constitution and authorities of the realm.” As a climax of wickedness, he and his son were said to have “taken pledges from the parishioners to quit the Established Church.” But the “mischief” was already done. The parish church was left nearly empty. On a site gifted by Dr. Ingram a church was built. For about five months, until the church was ready, the congregation worshipped in a tent. Services were conducted on alternate Sabbaths during the winter, at Uyeasound in the Society School and at Haroldwich, in the Independent Chapel. Immediately after the Disruption a church was built at Uyeasound, towards the cost of which the Countess of Effingham gave £600. A site was granted by Gilbert Spence of Hammer at an annual feu-duty of 5s. In 1880 the members residing in the south part of the island were disjoined to form the congregation of Uyeasound.

Membership

1848,890;

1900, 377.

Ministers

James Ingram, D.D., 1843-1879

John Ingram, M.A., 1843-1892

David Deans, 1888 — —.

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UNST – UYEASOUND

Up to 1880 the Free Church people in the south of Unst had been members of the congregation at Hillside. In that year they were disjoined to form the congregation of Uyeasound, where a church had been built soon after the Disruption in which, on alternate Sabbaths, services had been held.

Membership

1882, 314;

1900, 334.

Ministers

Peter Macgregor, 1881-1888

W. H. Glover, 1888 — .

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WALLS AND SANDNESS

John Elder, minister of Walls, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were built in 1844. After Mr. Elder’s retirement, in 1858, occasional supply was given until, in 1864, another minister was settled. In 1896 the congregation was placed under the superintendence of an ordained preacher.

Membership

1848, 106;

1900, 102.

Ministers

John Elder, 1843-1858

P. C. M’Eachran, 1864-1868

Archibald Jolly, 1869-1876

A. C. Willox, M.A., 1877-1896.

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WEISDALE

This congregation took its rise in the revival of 1859. It was fostered by the work of Angus Macintosh, a minister from Canada. A church was built in 1863, and a manse in 1864. The charge was sanctioned in 1866. The population of the valley, one of the prettiest and most fertile in Shetland, was sadly reduced by the eviction of fifty-three families in the years 1876-86.

Membership

1868, 139;

1900, 105.

Minister

Alexander Macdonald, 1866 — .

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YELL – NORTH

In 1843 a number of people here “came out,” and were cared for as he found opportunity by Dr. Ingram of Unst. He ordained office-bearers and dispensed the sacraments in the open air. For many years services were held by student missionaries and others in North Yell, Mid Yell, and West Yell. The congregation at North Yell worshipped in a house until, in 1862, the church was opened. The charge was sanctioned in 1864. In 1865 a church and manse were built at West Yell, which was placed on the footing of a preaching station. For the members of Mid Yell Mrs. Budge of Seafield gave the use of a hall, where, from 1864, services were held and the sacraments dispensed by the minister and office-bearers of North Yell. The population consisted of crofters. The leaving of many young men and women for employment in the towns was a serious drawback.

Membership

1865, 207;

1900, 182.

Ministers

C. S. Murray, 1864-1878

J. H. Allan, 1881-1898 [Vol.1 and Death Index says that he died in 1899.]

William Taylor, 1899 — .

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YELL – WEST [station]

In 1862 the Free Church residents here were formed into a congregation on the footing of a preaching station. Services were held in the open air, or in a barn at Lindburn. The church was built in 1866, and the manse in 1874. In 1900 it was put in charge of an ordained probationer.