Congregations 12

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56. PRESBYTERY OF STRATHBOGIE

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BOTRIPHNIE

The minister of Botriphnie was one of the seven who were deposed in the famous Strathbogie case. The parish was supplied by missionaries. In 1843 there was a great exodus from the parish church. No convenient site could at first be obtained, and a wooden building was erected at the extreme end of the parish. A manse was built near it in 1847. A new church was built in a suitable position, and opened in 1854. The old manse was sold, and a new one built here in 1900. Emigration and the movement to larger towns operated to the disadvantage of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 146;

1900, 102.

Ministers

Alexander Fairweather, 1843-1869

R. Urquhart, M.A., 1869-1874

Robert Grant, 1874 — .

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CAIRNIE

The minister of Cairnie was one of those deposed in the Strathbogie case. The congregation had, before the Disruption, chosen the acting missionary to be their minister. The church was built in 1844, and the manse a little later. In 1892 a wing was added to the manse. Decrease in the population led to a diminished membership.

Membership

1848, 190;

1900, 81.

Ministers

William Moffat, 1843-1886

G. W. Alison, 1886-1888

W. MacGillivray, 1888 — .

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GARTLY

The minister of Gartly, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were forthwith erected.

Membership

1848, 212;

1900, 155.

Ministers

John Robertson, 1843-1858 [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1848 and died in 1855.]

M. Macgregor, 1854-1863

W. Raith, Ph.D., 1864-1868

A. H. Reid, M.A., 1868-1872

H. M’Intosh, M.A., 1872-1877

F. W. Stuart, M.A., 1877 — .

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GLASS

The minister of Glass was one of those deposed in the Strathbogie case. The congregation had practically left the Establishment before the Disruption, and enjoyed regular supply. Church and manse were erected in 1845, the latter consisting of one storey. A second storey was added in 1846. The congregation suffered through depopulation and changes in tenancies of farms.

Membership

1848, 184;

1900, 84.

Ministers

James M’Donald, 1843-1876

Duncan Macaulay, M.A., 1876 — .

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GRANGE

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. Church and manse were soon erected. In 1878 the church was reconstructed and a hall taken off, the church being larger than was necessary. The congregation lost to other Free churches opened in the district. It also suffered through depopulation.

Membership

1848, 260;

1900, 129.

Ministers

W. Sinclair, 1843-1845

John Murdoch, 1846-1877

James Stockdale, 1877 — .

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HUNTLY

This congregation was in existence before the Disruption. The Evangelicals “came out” of the Establishment, and built a church in 1840, which they called Strathbogie New Church. In 1843 they became the Free Church congregation of Huntly. In 1845 a section of the congregation petitioned for a separate supply of ordinances. This was granted for a time. Finally the breach was healed through the retirement of the minister and the settlement of a successor. The manse was built in 1852. A church hall was added, and in 1871 a mission church was erected at Kinnoir. The congregation profited by the revival in 1859.

Membership

1848, 530;

1900, 533.

Ministers

W. Mackray, M.A., 1843-1849

Robert Rainy, D.D., 1851-1854

H. M. Williamson, D.D., 1855-1867

William Burnet, 1868-1895 [Vol.1 says he was translated here in 1867.]

A. H. Douglas, M.A., 1890-1893

A. S. Laidlaw, B.D., 1893 — .

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KEITH

The minister of Keith was one of those deposed in the Strathbogie case. The Free Church congregation really originated in 1839, when the Evangelicals left the Established Church. For a time they worshipped part of the day in one of the Relief churches in Keith. The other Relief church becoming vacant, they bought that building. Finally, after much difficulty a site was secured, and a church erected in 1846. The manse was built in 1847. That year also a school was provided, which, at the passing of the Education Act, was given over to the School Board. In 1887 a hall was erected in the village of Newmill, 2 miles from Keith, for Sunday school and religious services.

Membership

1848, 450;

1900, 487.

Ministers

A. MacGillivray, 1843-1869

William Gillespie, 1870-1879

R. Macleod, 1879-1884

Hugh Fitzpatrick, 1885 — .

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NEW MARNOCH

The congregation of Marnoch took an active part in the Ten Years’ Conflict. They resisted the settlement of an unacceptable presentee, and, failing in their effort, they left the parish church on January 21, 1841, and stood as a Non-Intrusion congregation till they joined the Free Church in 1843, under the name of New Marnoch. They worshipped at first in a wooden church in the Inchline. Their appeal for funds was liberally responded to, and in 1841-42 a new church and manse were erected at Aberchirder.

Membership

1848, 803;

1900, 532.

Ministers

David Henry, M.A., 1841-1870

George Johnston, 1871 — .

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ROTHIEMAY

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. They worshipped at first in the mill loft, and afterwards in a wooden building. A manse was built in 1845. School and teacher’s house, built in 1847, were made over to the School Board in 1873. The church was erected in 1852. A new manse was provided in 1897. The church was renovated in 1899, when hall and vestry were added.

Membership

1848, 310;

1900, 246.

Ministers

W. Ingram, M.A., 1843-1900

A. M’Tavish, M.A., 1897 — .

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57. PRESBYTERY OF ABERNETHY

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ABERNETHY

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. A catechist was appointed, and ordained ministers gave occasional services. A site for a place of worship being refused, the congregation met in private houses and in the open air, until about 1850, when a site was at length secured. Church, manse, and offices were erected. A wing was afterwards added to the manse. Sanction as a regular charge, asked for in 1853, was granted in 1855; but no minister was settled till 1862. The congregation suffered through the depopulation of the district; but the growth of Nethy Bridge as a summer resort led to a greatly increased attendance in the summer-time.

Membership

1870, 126;

1900, 156.

Minister

Walter Ross, 1862 — .

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ALVIE AND ROTHIEMURCHUS

The people who left the parish church in 1843 were formed into a congregation under the name of Alvie Free Church. Later they were joined by the people from Rothiemurchus, and took the name of Alvie and Rothiemurchus Free Church. Services were provided under the charge of the minister of Kingussie. For some years the services were held in barns, sheds, etc. The church was built at Milehead (Alvie) in 1851. A few years later, a meeting-house was erected for the Rothiemurchus section of the congregation. The manse was provided in 1868. The resident population declined, but latterly the district attracted many summer visitors.

Membership

1858, 15;

1893, 271 (including adherents).

Ministers

James Grant, 1856-1867

Norman Macdonald, 1868 — .

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CROMDALE AND ADVIE

This district was at first connected with the church at Grantown, which was then known as Cromdale Free Church. In 1889 a number of people left the parish church, and applied to the Free Church Presbytery for services. The congregation was organised as a station. The charge was sanctioned in 1893. Church and manse were erected in 1896.

Membership

1894, 60;

1900, 69.

Ministers

J. W. Jackson, 1894-1896

John D. Lang, 1896 — .

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DUTHIL (CARRBRIDGE)

A congregation was formed here at the Disruption, and a minister was settled in October 1843. During that winter the congregation had to worship in the open air, and the minister’s health broke down. A long vacancy ensued, greatly to the detriment of the congregation. A church was erected in 1850-51. The charge was reduced to a station in 1852, but sanction was restored in 1853. No minister was settled till 1859. A gallery was added to the church in 1863.

Membership

1866, 400;

1900, 240.

Ministers

John Mackintosh, 1843-1844

John Logan, 1859-1869

Dugald Matheson, 1870-1874

Ewan M’Leod, 1876-1895

William Morrison, M.A., 1896 — .

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GRANTOWN

This congregation was formed in Grantown in the autumn of 1843, and at first worshipped in a wooden church. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. Church and manse were erected in 1849. The church was enlarged in 1898. This congregation was at first known as Cromdale Free Church, but on the erection of a charge at Cromdale it took the name of Grantown Free Church.

Membership

1848, 425;

1900, 184.

Ministers

Donald Fraser, 1848-1865

Evan Gordon, 1866-1869

A. C. Fullarton, 1870-1875

Alexander M’Diarmid, M.A., 1876 — .

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KINGUSSIE AND NEWTONMORE

The minister of Kingussie, and a considerable congregation, “came out” in 1843. A church was built in 1844. A manse was purchased in 1850. A new church was erected in 1877. In 1884 George R. Mackenzie gifted a new manse. The influx of summer visitors in later years to Kingussie and Newtonmore greatly helped the congregation.

Membership

1848, 108;

1900, 89.

Ministers

George Shepherd, M.A., 1843-1852

Neil Dewar, 1856 — .

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KIRKMICHAEL

The minister of the parish, and many of his people, “came out “ in 1843. Church and manse were erected in 1844, the latter largely at the minister’s own expense, his family meanwhile living in Elgin. A hall was built in Tomintoul in 1896. In that year the Duke of Richmond and Gordon granted a perpetual feu, on reasonable terms, for the site of church and manse. The church was renovated and the manse enlarged in 1900. The rural districts of the parish suffered from depopulation. Tomintoul, the highest village in Scotland, became a noted summer resort. The work of the congregation was done in what was described as “a stronghold of Roman Catholicism.”

Membership

1848, 106;

1900, 95.

Ministers

Alexander Tulloch, M.A., 1843-1855

John MacQueen, 1855-1880

Alexander Miller, 1881-1884

William Grant, 1885 — .

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LAGGAN

Almost all the people at Laggan adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They were organised as a congregation under the minister of Kingussie—a former minister of Laggan. Church and manse were forthwith erected. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. The school erected was the gift of Mrs. Macpherson of Cluny, who also helped considerably in the church and manse scheme. In early days the congregation was greatly indebted to her. It suffered from the decline of the population.

Membership

1848, 51;

1900, 34.

Ministers

Dugald Shaw, 1848-1890

Duncan Maclennan, 1892 — .

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58. PRESBYTERY OF ABERLOUR

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ABERLOUR

In July 1843 services were provided for the adherents of the Free Church here. The congregation at first met in a commodious hall. They were deprived of this, and afterwards met in an old smithy at the Muir of Ruthrie. A probationer was appointed in 1846. The church was erected in 1847. The charge was sanctioned in 1859; and that year the manse was built. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1899. The manse also was renovated and improved.

Membership

1861, 82;

1900, 180.

Ministers

James Scott, D.D., LL. D., 1859 —

J. S. Boyd, M.A., 1895 — .

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BOHARM

Services were provided for the Free Church residents here from January 1844 till January 1857 by the minister of Botriphnie. A probationer was then appointed. The church was built, and opened in 1857. The charge was sanctioned in 1859. The manse was erected in 1863. Rural depopulation told heavily against the congregation.

Membership

1861,109;

1900,100.

Ministers

William Morrison, M.A., 1859-1885 [Vol.1 says he died 1880.]

Thomas Havre, 1886-1889

John D. Hunter, 1889 — .

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INVERAVON

This congregation was formed at the Disruption. A temporary place of worship was secured. This, however, they were obliged to leave in 1845. They met for a time in the open air, near the public road. Two stones there, one inscribed “Moderator’s Seat” and the other “Clerk’s Table,” mark the spot where the Presbytery met the congregation. The landed proprietors resisted all efforts to secure a permanent site. A wooden church was erected in 1846-47. At length, in 1854, a site having been granted, church and manse were built.

Membership

1848, 121;

1900, 102.

Ministers

Patrick Tulloch, 1844-1871

Donald Robertson, 1871 — [Vol.1 says he retired in 1893.]

John Smith, 1893 — .

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KNOCKANDO

Those who left the parish church in 1843 were formed into a congregation here, and the charge was sanctioned by the Assembly’s Special Commission in March 1844. A site was obtained from a local proprietor, who also gave valuable assistance in the erection of the church, which was opened in 1845. The manse was built in 1848.

Membership

1848, 147;

1900, 175.

Ministers

Alexander Rhind, 1844-1857

Joshua M’Intosh, 1858-1867

Robert Fraser, 1868-1875

R. R. M’Queen, 1875 — .

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MORTLACH

The parish minister of Mortlach was suspended in 1839. The Edict of Suspension was read by the officiating minister in the public square, the church door being locked. A congregation apart from the Establishment was then formed. Worship was held for a time in a grain loft of Mortlach Brewery. A section of the people in the parish adhering to this congregation worshipped in a barn on the farm of Lynemore. A wooden structure was erected in 1840, called locally “The Tarry Kirk,” the roof being covered with tarred felt. A feu was obtained from the Earl of Fife. The manse was built in 1849, and the church in 1850. The church was reconstructed and enlarged in 1892. Lord Mount Stephen presented a stained-glass memorial window, and subscribed handsomely towards the Building Fund.

Membership

1848, 253;

1900, 231.

Ministers

[Thomas Bain said to be minister here at the Disruption, was translated that same year, Vol.1.]

Alexander M’Pherson, B.A., 1844-1845

John Shoolbraid, 1846-1875

Sir W. R. Nicoll, LL. D., 1874-1877

David Eaton, D.D., 1878-1884

James Smith, 1885-1895

James Russell, M.A., 1896 — .

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ROTHES

The minister of the parish, and a considerable congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were built in 1843-44. A new church was erected, and opened in August 1900.

Membership

1848, 422;

1900, 270.

Ministers

Alexander M’Watt, 1843-1880

James Hendry, M.A., 1878-1886

Donald Cameron, M.A., 1886-1895

C. Chalmers Cowie, 1896 — .

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59. PRESBYTERY OF ELGIN

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ALVES

The minister of Alves and many of his people adhered to the Free Church in 1843. Among the landed proprietors there was strong hostility to the Free Church, and for a time he could not obtain a suitable dwelling-house in the parish. Eventually a site was secured, and church and manse erected.

Membership

1848,102;

1900, 78.

Ministers

Alexander Gentle, 1843-1869

Duncan Colvin, 1869 — .

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BELLIE (FOCHABERS)

The minister of the parish, and a large section of the people, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped at first in a wooden building which was put up in a single day. A church was erected in 1844, and a manse in 1845. Alexander Pringle, collector of Inland Revenue, Inverness, a native of Fochabers, bequeathed the sum of £3000 for the erection of a new church. This was supplemented by the liberality of the congregation, and the new church was built in 1900. The congregation suffered through emigration and decrease of the population. At first in the Presbytery of Strathbogie, Bellie was later transferred to that of Elgin.

Membership

1848, 378;

1900, 258.

Ministers

David Dewar, 1843-1885

James Gray, 1876 — .

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BURGHEAD

The minister here, one elder, and many of the people adhered to the Free Church in 1843. For about a year they continued to worship in the church, but then had to leave it. They worshipped in the open air for a time, and then in a granary fitted up for the purpose. Church and manse were erected shortly afterwards.

Membership

1848, 274;

1900, 289,

Ministers

David Waters, 1843-1887

Robert Niven, 1877 — .

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ELGIN – HIGH

At the Disruption this was the only church in Elgin. The minister and nearly all the congregation “came out” in 1843. The church was built in 1843; the manse in 1844. Vestry and classroom were added in 1869. The church was renovated and reseated in 1893. In 1850, with the goodwill of all parties, a second congregation was formed. The original congregation then took the name of the High Church.

Membership

1848, 740;

1900, 705.

Ministers

Alexander Topp, D.D., 1843-1852

R. J. Watt, 1852-1862

Archibald Smellie, 1863-1868

S. R. Macphail, D.D., 1869-1878 [Under Glasgow – Great Hamilton Street it says that he was translated there in 1879.]

R. Cowan, 1878 — .

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ELGIN – SOUTH

As the High Church—then Elgin Free Church—could no longer accommodate all the worshippers, a second charge was formed in the town, and sanctioned in 1851, as the South Free Church. The old Baptist chapel was rented and used for a time as the place of worship. A new church was erected, and opened in January 1854. Later, it was improved internally, and a small hall was added. The manse was purchased in 1867. About 1865 mission work was begun in the north-west part of the town. In 1873 two rooms were rented in Gordon’s Close, and turned into a small hall. In 1879 the West End mission hall was built. The clock and bell in the church spire were the gift of Miss Robertson.

Membership

1854, 164;

1900, 372.

Ministers

Geo. Shepherd, M.A., 1852-1853

D. G. Gordon, 1854-1866 [Vol.1 says he is D. C. Gordon.]

William Traill, 1867-1874

W. A. Gray, 1874-1900

John Lendrum, M.A., 1900 — .

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GARMOUTH

This congregation was formed at the Disruption by those who left the parish church. They worshipped for a time in a low-ceiled, badly ventilated building in the town known as “Corff House.” The church was built in 1845, and the manse in 1850. The church school was erected in 1849. In 1884 the school was fitted up as a church hall. In 1886 a small property was purchased in the village of Kingston, and adapted to the purpose of Sabbath school and religious meetings. The church was renovated in 1893. In former times Garmouth had a prosperous trade in shipping and shipbuilding. The substitution of iron for wood in the construction of ships brought this to an end, and the population declined. Latterly visitors began to come to the villages in the summer months.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 175.

Ministers

John Allan, 1843-1891

Geo. Gardiner, M.A., 1880 — .

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HOPEMAN

When it became necessary to build a new church at Burghead, the members of that congregation in the eastern part of the district desired and obtained separate services, which were held in the school at Hopeman. A church was erected in 1852. A manse was also provided. The charge was sanctioned in 1856.

Membership

1858, 135;

1900, 437.

Ministers

C. F. Corbet, 1856-1865

Geo. Cassie, 1866 — .

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LOSSIEMOUTH (formerly DRAINIE FREE CHURCH)

This congregation was formed at the Disruption by the people who adhered to the Free Church in Lossiemouth. They worshipped for a time in an old granary in Clifton Road. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly’s Commission in April 1844. The church was built in 1845, and the manse in 1849. The church walls gave way owing to insecure foundations, and a new church had to be erected in 1856. The second church was burned down in October 1886. The third church was built, and opened in March 1888.

Membership

1854, 138;

1900, 243.

Ministers

D. N. Mackay, 1844-1852

Peter M’Laren, 1853-1858

Charles Tulloch, 1858 — .

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PLUSCARDEN

The minister of the chapel-of-case at Pluscarden, and all the congregation but one family, “came out” in 1843. Before the Disruption they had worshipped in part of the old Priory of Pluscarden. This they continued to do till 1897, when the priory was sold to the Marquis of Bute. Then the church was erected. A new manse also was built. The congregation suffered considerably through depopulation.

Membership

1848, 85;

1900, 87.

Ministers

Robert Dunbar, 1843-1859

Alexander Robb, 1859-1884

Robert Gordon, M.A., 1884 — .

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URQUHART

This congregation was formed at the Disruption by those who adhered to the Free Church in the parishes of St. Andrews, Lhanbryde, and Urquhart. They worshipped at first in a barn at Meft. Then the Earl of Fife’s Trustees gave them the use of the old parish church, a new one having just been erected. Of this they were deprived by interdict, and returned to the barn, moving later to a wooden erection in the village. The church was erected in 1844, the materials of the old parish church being purchased for the purpose. The charge was sanctioned that year. The school was built in 1845, and the manse in 1846. The manse was renovated in 1894. The population considerably decreased owing largely to the disappearance of small holdings.

Members/up

1848, 206;

1900, 229.

Ministers

James Morrison, 1844-1899

Alex. Chalmers Smith, M.A., 1893 — .

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60. PRESBYTERY OF FORRES

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DALLAS

The minister of the parish did not “come out” at the Disruption, but his wife and family, with many of his people, adhered to the Free Church. One of his sons became a minister of the Free Church. Regular services were arranged, and in August 1844 a minister was settled. A site for a church was very unwillingly granted by Sir William Gordon Cumming of Altyre, proprietor of Dallas, and patron of the parish. He reserved the right to terminate the feu at six months’ notice, on paying the value of the building, his object being “so to exercise the right of patronage as once more to collect the sheep into one fold.” The church, built in 1845, was reconstructed in 1870. The manse was erected in 1849. The population of the parish considerably decreased.

Membership

1848, 102;

1900, 55.

Ministers

William Davidson, M.A., 1844-1895

John N. Balfour, M.A., 1896 — .

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DYKE

Mark Aitken, minister of the parish, and the greater part of his flock, “came out” in 1843. Only a very inconvenient site could be secured in the village of Kintessock. There the church was built, and opened in December 1843. In 1853 a manse was built on a site nearer the centre of the parish. Here also a new church was erected, and opened in March 1867. The population of the district steadily declined.

Membership

1848, 160;

1900, 95.

Ministers

Mark Aitken, 1843-1869 [Vol.1 says he retired 1855 and died 1869.]

William Winter, D.D., 1857 — .

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EDINKILLIE

The minister of the parish was expected to “come out” in 1843, but finally elected to remain in the Established Church. Services were provided for the people adhering to the Free Church. A convenient site desired by the congregation was refused, and the church had to be built in a position 2 miles distant from the populated part of the parish. It was opened in 1844, and in December of that year a minister was settled. The manse, erected in 1844, was burned down in 1877, and another was built in 1878. A new church was built in 1877. The distance of the building from the main body of the people, and the many evictions carried out in the parish, hindered the prosperity of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 70;

1900, 79.

Ministers

Donald Macdonald, 1844-1863

Alexander Anderson, D.D., 1863 — .

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FORRES

Duncan Grant, minister of Forres, and many of his people, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. The congregation worshipped for a time in the Independent chapel. A church was built in Cumming Street, and opened in February 1844. A house in Tolbooth Street was bought for a manse. It was enlarged in 1867.

Membership

1848, 259;

1900, 359.

Ministers

Duncan Grant, M.A., 1843-1866

Adam Robertson, 1852-1893

James Hendry, M.A., 1894 — .

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KINLOSS

William Robertson, minister of Kinloss, “came out” in 1843, and, with those who accompanied him, formed the Free Church congregation. A church was built in the village of Findhorn, and opened in February 1844. The manse was built in 1845. The revival of 1859 made a great impression on Findhorn. The decay in wooden shipbuilding and fishing, which were the main industries of the place, told adversely on the membership of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 125;

1900, 113.

Ministers

William Robertson, M.A., 1843-1860

James Finlay Macara, 1856-1879

John Macpherson, M.A., 1878-1900

W. Cumming Skinner, M.A., 1900 — .

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RAFFORD

Dr. George Mackay, minister of Rafford, with all his elders and the main body of his people, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. Worship was conducted for a time in a barn, but soon a church was built on a site granted by the Earl of Fife. Dr. Mackay resided at a farm which he rented in the Bargie district. The manse was built in 1860.

Membership

1848, 182;

1900, 103.

Ministers

George Mackay, D.D., 1843-1863

David Mackay, 1860-1875

John Baird, 1876-1881

C. E. Taylor, 1881 — .

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