Congregations 10


 

46. PRESBYTERY OF ARBROATH

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ARBIRLOT

The parish minister and many of his people “came out” in 1843. Refused any site for a place of worship, they met for a time in a barn rented from a neighbouring farmer. At the beginning of winter they were obliged to leave it. A wooden church was then erected on another farm, where they worshipped till 1854, when from a new proprietor they obtained a site, and church and manse were erected.

Membership

1848, 245;

1900, 97.

Ministers

John Kirk, 1843-1858

R. S. Thomson, M.A., 1858-1878

 E. T. Vernon, M.A., 1879 — .

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ARBROATH – EAST

This congregation was formed at the Disruption by those who “came out” of the Old Church and the Abbey Church, Arbroath. They worshipped in the Sheriff Court House until their church was opened. The church with school was built in the extreme east of the town. In 1854 a Territorial district was assigned to it between the Abbey and High Street. In 1850 the manse was built. A new church was erected in 1875 at Brothock Bridge, in the centre of the town.

Membership

1848, 486;

1900, 458.

Ministers

Alex. Hislop, 1844-1865

John Robertson, 1864-1883 [Vol.1 says 1861.]

J. W. MacLaren, M.A., 1883-1885

T. S. Anderson, 1885 — .

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ARBROATH – HIGH STREET

This congregation represents the majority of Maule Street Antiburgher congregation, which joined the Free Church in 1852. The minority, who refused to join, retained the church. An old Episcopalian church in High Street was purchased in 1857, and the congregation took the name of High Street The manse was bought in 1887.

Membership

1858, 165;

1900, 294.

Ministers

John Sandison, 1843-1871 [Only became Free Church minister in 1852.]

Frank Mudie, 1869-1886

J. J. Wright Pollock, M.A., 1887-1896

A. Morris Stewart, D.D., 1897 — .

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ARBROATH – INVERBROTHOCK

The minister of Inverbrothock quoad sacra church, and the great bulk of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Deprived of their church, they worshipped in a wooden erection near the parish church until their own church was opened in October 1843. Later the church was renovated and partly rebuilt A manse was erected in 1849, and also a school, subsequently used as a church hall. A new church was built in 1888, when the school was sold and the proceeds applied to the cost of the new building. The manse was sold the same year, and a new one acquired. Mission work has been carried on since 1849.

Membership

1848, 694;

1900, 471.

Ministers

David Crichton, LL. D., 1843-1888

Alex. Rust, M.A., 1876 — .

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ARBROATH – KNOX’S

This congregation was planted to meet the needs of the district on the north-west side of Arbroath. Church and hall were erected in 1866, and in that year the charge was sanctioned. A manse was built in 1894. In spite of a diminishing population in a district that seems to have been over-churched, the congregation maintained a fairly steady membership.

Membership

1868, 291;

1900, 292.

Ministers

W. Scrymgeour, 1867-1873

J. P. Lilley, D.D., 1874 — .

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ARBROATH – LADYLOAN

The minister of this quoad sacra charge, and almost the entire congregation, “came out” in 1843. They continued to worship in the church until extruded in 1845. In the end of that year their own church was opened. A manse also was built, which was enlarged in 1878.

Membership

1848, 845;

1900, 973.

Ministers

Alex. Leslie, 1843-1870

John Chalmers, M.A., 1870-1877

J. M. Scott, 1878 — .

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BARRY

The minister of the parish, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were erected. A new church was built in 1888.

Membership

1848, 215;

1900, 251.

Ministers

James Lumsden, D.D., 1843-1856

James MacGregor, D.D., 1857-1861

C. G. M’Crie, D.D., 1862-1864

S. D. F. Salmond, D.D., 1865-1876

W. G. Still, 1876-1883

A. J. Campbell, M.A., B.D., 1884 — .

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CARMYLLIE

The minister of the parish and many of his people adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. No site could be obtained for church or manse. They erected a wooden church, but of this they were deprived. They worshipped for a time in a tent, and then erected a second wooden church. Finally a site was secured, and church and manse erected. In sympathy with, and appreciation of their gallant struggle, the Synod appointed a special collection to assist them. The congregation suffered through the closing of the quarries in the neighbourhood. The minister shared in the benefits of the Dalhousie Endowment and of the Duncan Fund.

Membership

1848, 234;

1900, 189.

Ministers

W. Wilson, D.D., 1843-1848

John Gow, 1849-1865

John Keith, M.A., 1865 —

Stewart Crabb, M.A., 1897 — .

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CARNOUSTIE – ST. STEPHEN’S

The minister of this quoad sacra charge, and the congregation almost without exception, “came out” at the Disruption. Church and manse were retained until 1850. In the course of that year new church and manse were erected.

Membership

1848, 389;

1900, 443.

Ministers

Thos. Dymock, M.A., 1843-1844 [Under Perth – Middle and in Vol.1, it is said that he was translated from here in 1845.]

Alex. Comrie, 1846-1880

James Philip, 1881 — .

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CARNOUSTIE – SECOND CHARGE

This congregation, formerly Original Secession, joined the Free Church, with its minister, in 1852. After Mr. Meek’s death, considering the weakness of the congregation, and the fact that the needs of the town were otherwise sufficiently supplied, it was thought the charge should not be continued. This view was given effect to by the Assembly in 1862. The congregation then connected itself with the Reformed Presbyterian Synod.

Membership

1859, 77.

Minister

James Meek, 1852-1859.

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COLLISTON

This congregation was formed of those who “came out” of St Vigean’s Church at the Disruption. Two elders and Mr. Wilson of Carmyllie constituted the kirk session at Westmill of Colliston on June 28, 1843. The church was erected in 1843-44, the manse in 1850-51, and a school and teacher’s house shortly afterwards. The congregation suffered through the failure of the weaving trade, and decrease of the population.

Membership

1848, 183;

1900, 161.

Ministers

A. Peebles, 1843-1876

Andrew Morris, 1876 — .

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FRIOCKHEIM

The minister and congregation of this quoad sacra parish “came out” in 1843. They were allowed to retain the church till the following year, when a new church was erected. The manse was built in 1850. The church was enlarged in 1870.

Membership

1848, 296;

1900, 251.

Ministers

Thos. Wilson, 1843-1872

Benjamin Bell, B.D., 1871-1882

James Nicoll, 1883-1893

George Burnett, 1894 — .

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INVERKEILLOR

Dr. John Laird, minister of the parish, with a considerable congregation, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. Church and manse were soon erected. The congregation suffered through decline of the rural population.

Membership

1848, 296;

1900, 123.

Ministers

John Laird, D.D., 1843-1847

Wm. Masterton, 1848-1895

John Adams, B.D., 1888 — .

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PANBRIDE

This congregation was formed immediately after the Disruption. For ten years they were refused a site for a place of worship. They met at first in a barn, then in a wooden church erected in 1844, in a field of a neighbouring farmer, who dared threats of future expulsion. In 1854 Lord Panmure gave a site and a donation of £100. The church was opened in May 1854. The manse was built in 1859. In 1887 the church was partially burned. It was repaired and enlarged in 1888.

Membership

1848, 202;

1900, 308.

Ministers

Hugh Martin, D.D., 1844-1858

James Innes, M.A., 1858-1894

E. B. H. Macpherson, M.A., 1895 — .

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47. PRESBYTERY OF FORDOUN

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BENHOLM

James Glen, minister of the parish, with six elders and many of the congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. The people at the time were roused by an evangelical awakening, and more than 200 became members of the Free Church. The church was opened in December 1843. Manse and school were erected in 1848. The congregation suffered through decline of the fishing and weaving industries. There was also a United Presbyterian church in the village.

Membership

1848, 260;

1900, 142.

Ministers

James Glen, M.A., 1843-1866

James Roger, 1867 — .

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BERVIE

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, a kirk session being provided by the appointment of assessors. Inconvenient temporary accommodation was secured until the church was opened in 1844. That year the charge was sanctioned. The manse was erected in 1850. The church was rebuilt in 1893. The population of the town and district considerably decreased.

Membership

1848, 125;

1900, 136.

Ministers

James M’Gown, 1844-1846

J. G. Small, 1847-1888

Alex. Whyte, 1883 — .

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FETTERCAIRN

This congregation was organised in June 1843. The church was built in 1843-44. The charge was sanctioned in 1844. The manse was erected in 1846. The church suffered through decline of the population, owing to emigration, and the disappearance of crofts and small holdings.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 122.

Ministers

David Paton, 1844-1880

R. H. I. Abel, 1881-1891

J. R. Macmillan, M.A., 1892 — .

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FORDOUN

This congregation was organised at the Disruption. The church was built in 1843, and the manse about 1847. Captain Burnett of Monboddo was a generous benefactor of this and other congregations in the neighbourhood. A tablet inscribed to his memory is erected in the church, in which he was an acting elder. The congregation suffered owing to the depopulation of the country districts.

Membership

1848, 333;

1900, 137.

Ministers

John Philip, D.D., 1844 —

John Anderson, B.D., 1897 — .

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GLENBERVIE

The formation of this congregation at the Disruption was largely due to the leadership of Captain Burnett of Monboddo, the friend and host of Dr. Chalmers. Ordinances were granted by the Presbytery in June 1843. At first the congregation worshipped in a hall in the village, but the church was soon erected. The manse was built in 1848. In 1850 the church was replaced by a new building on the same site. School buildings were acquired and teaching carried on till 1873. The population greatly declined through failure of the weaving industry and emigration.

Membership

1848, 165;

1900, 95.

Ministers

Andrew Glen, 1844-1863

James Cameron, M.A., 1864-1875

R. M. Boyd, M.A., 1875 — .

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KINNEFF

Dr. Thomas Brown (author of the Annals of the Disruption), minister of the parish, and a large portion of his congregation, “came out” in 1843, and formed the Free Church congregation. Church and manse were erected that year. Both were subsequently repaired and improved. The congregation suffered heavily through the depopulation of the district

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 86.

Ministers

Thomas Brown, D.D., 1843-1849

Alexander Watt, M.A., 1849-1889

James Hastings, D.D., 1884-1898

Thomas Fraser, M.A., 1898 — .

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LAURENCEKIRK

This congregation was formed at the Disruption of those who “came out” of the Established Church. At first the congregation had a very hard struggle, owing to the great influence of Dr. Cook, minister of the parish, which was cast against them. Division in the congregation also delayed settlement of a minister for a year. Church, manse, and school were soon erected. A new church was built in the “fifties,” the clock in the tower being presented by the Messrs. Sinclair in memory of their parents. The old church and school were made into dwelling-houses. The school was sold and the proceeds applied to the building of a church hall. A new manse was built in 1895.

Membership

1848, 145;

1900, 180.

Ministers

Charles Glass, 1844-1853 [Vol.1 says he resigned from there in 1854.]

David Simpson, 1854-1893

Thomas Lawrie, M.A., 1893 — .

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MARYKIRK

This congregation was formed at the Disruption of those who adhered to the Free Church, and occasional services were at first provided. The church was erected in 1846. The charge was sanctioned in 1847. The manse was built in 1849, and reconstructed in 1895. The church was renovated in 1900. The congregation suffered through the drift of young people away from the country, decline of the population, and changes in the farms in the district.

Membership

1848, 134;

1900, 112.

Ministers

William Munnies, 1849-1866

J. G. Gray, D.D., 1867-1875

Hector M. Adam, B.D., 1876-1879

D. A. M’Kinnon, 1879 — .

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ST. CYRUS

The colleague ministers of this parish—father and son—with a considerable congregation, “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were soon erected.

Membership

1848, 380;

1900, 138.

Ministers

Alex. Keith, D.D., 1843-1880

Alex. Keith, jr., 1843-1880

Geo. Anderson, 1862 — .

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STONEHAVEN

Anticipating the Disruption, an association had been formed here in February 1843. At the Disruption a congregation was at once constituted of the adherents of the Free Church in the parishes of Dunnottar and Fetteresso. A church was erected in 1843-44, and a manse in 1852. The church was rebuilt in 1868-69.

Membership

1848, 300;

1900, 406.

Ministers

George Philip, D.D., 1843-1851

Alex. Roberts, D.D., 1852-1857

Wm. Dougall, 1858-1889

J. Robertson, 1886-1889

S. G. Maclennan, M.A., 1890-1895

H. E. Michie, 1895 — .

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48. PRESBYTERY OF ABERDEEN

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ABERDEEN – BON-ACCORD

The minister and congregation of this church “came out” at the Disruption. A heavy debt on the building led to its sale, when it was bought in for the Free Church. It was enlarged and renovated in 1875. It was sold to the School Board, and a new church erected in 1896. As a central city charge, the congregation suffered from the movement of the better-to-do classes to suburban districts.

Membership

1848, 570;

1900, 392.

Ministers

Gavin Parker, 1843-1845

S. Grant, 1846-1853

Charles Ross, M.A., 1854-1869

Alexander Leslie, 1870-1878

Hector M. Adam, B.D., 1879 — .

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ABERDEEN – CAUSEWAYEND

This congregation was begun in 1879 to meet the needs of a large population with no Free church in the neighbourhood. A hall was erected, and the charge was sanctioned in that year. The church was built in 1882.

Membership

1881, 53;

1900, 646.

Ministers

John Rae, M.A., 1880-1885

J. A. Russell, M.A., 1886 — .

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ABERDEEN – COMMERCE STREET, MARINERS’

The minister and congregation of this church—formerly Mariners’ Church—”came out” in 1843, and for some months retained the church. A new church was erected in Commerce Street in 1844. The name was changed to Commerce Street in 1881. The congregation consisted largely of seamen.

Membership

1848, 324;

1900, 334.

Ministers

J. Longmuir, LL. D., 1843-1883

A. Murray Scott, M.A., 1881 — .

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ABERDEEN – EAST

The minister of this parish, and the main body of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. Until their own church was opened in December of that year they worshipped in Charlotte Street United Secession Church. In 1892 the building formerly known as the Free South Church was added to the East Church, halls, session-room, and other accommodation being provided in it. The congregation suffered from its distance from the more eligible residential parts of the town. It was always prominent in Home Mission enterprise.

Membership

1848, 1060;

1900, 1033.

Ministers

James Foote, D.D., 1843-1856

J. C. Macphail, D.D., 1849-1868

J. S. Candlish, D.D., 1869-1872

James Selkirk, 1873 —

G. H. C. Macgregor, M.A., 1888-1894

C. H. Todd, M.A., 1895 — .

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ABERDEEN – FERRYHILL

This Church Extension charge was started by the Presbytery in 1872, after conference with local Free Church residents. The charge was sanctioned in 1874, and that year, in June, the church was opened. A manse was acquired in 1899. A mission hall was erected in Wellington Road. Soon afterwards it was burned down. As no good title could be obtained for that site, a mission hall was acquired in Holburn Street in 1898. The population steadily increased up till 1898.

Membership

1875, 96;

1900, 699.

Ministers

James Iverach, D.D., 1874-1887

T. B. Kilpatrick, D.D., 1888-1899

R. Bruce Taylor, D.D., 1900 — [Under Aberdeen – Ferryhill says the translation was in 1899.]

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ABERDEEN – GALLOWGATE

This congregation originated as a Territorial mission in 1853, under the Home Mission Committee. A mission hall was erected as the place of meeting. The church was built in 1861. From 1863 the Free South session took responsibility for the work; and the charge was sanctioned in 1866.

Membership

1868, 140,

1900, 138.

Minister

James Goodall, 1866 — .

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ABERDEEN – GILCOMSTON

The minister and congregation of this quoad sacra parish “came out” in 1843. A church was erected that year in Huntly Street. A new church was built in Union Street in 1868. The old church was transformed into Albert Hall. Through the growth of the city this became one of the central churches. Its development was affected by movements of the population, and the formation of new charges, especially to the west and north.

Membership

1848, 1088;

1900, 638.

Ministers

James Bryce, LL. D., 1843-1853

W. M’Gilvray, D.D., 1854-1880

R. A. Mitchell, M.A., 1877-1897

Robert Forgan, B.D., 1898 — .

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ABERDEEN – GREYFRIARS’

The minister of this parish, and many of his people, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. A church was erected in Crown Street. In 1856 the congregation removed to a church in George Street. On the resignation of Mr. Thomson, the charge was for two years regarded as a station, but full status was restored in 1872.

Membership

1848, 309

1900, 210

Ministers

A. L. Gordon, M.A., 1843-1845

John Thomson, 1846-1870 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1870 and died in 1893.]

H. Fitzpatrick, 1872-1884

William Smith, 1885 — .

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ABERDEEN – HIGH

When, in 1865, the West congregation moved to a new church, about 130 members remained, purchased the old building, and formed a new congregation. The charge was sanctioned in 1867. The cellar below the church was subsequently adapted to the purposes of a hall for Sunday-school and other work.

Membership

1869, 623;

1900, 787.

Ministers

H. M. Williamson, D.D., 1867-1870

H. W. Bell, M.A., 1871 — .

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ABERDEEN – HOLBURN

This congregation represents Gilcomston Chapel-of-Ease, the minister and almost the entire congregation of which “came out” at the Disruption. A church was erected in 1844 in Bon-Accord Terrace. Owing to a congestion of churches in this district, the congregation in 1894, at the request of the Presbytery, moved to a necessitous locality in Great Western Road, where a church, with ample hall accommodation, was erected.

Membership

1848, 1000;

1900, 452.

Ministers

W. L. Mitchell, 1843-1880

Andrew M’Queen, B.D., 1875 — .

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ABERDEEN – JOHN KNOX

Tbe minister, and most of the congregation of this Church Extension charge, “came out” in 1843. Church and school were forthwith erected, and a manse a little later. A new church was built, with hall, classrooms, etc., and opened in 1900.

Membership

1848, 1100;

1900, 978.

Ministers

John Stephen, M.A., 1843-1881

John Tainsh, 1878-1883

R. MacLeod, 1884 — .

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ABERDEEN – MARINERS’ See ABERDEEN –COMMERCE STREET.

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ABERDEEN –MELVILLE

This congregation, formerly Original Secession, joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, and adhered to the Free Church in 1843, carrying their property with them. The church in Correction Wynd had been purchased in 1772. It was renovated in 1878.

Membership

1848, 159;

1900, 591.

Ministers

William Primrose, 1843-1866

J. H. Collie, M.A., 1867-1875

James Masson, 1875-1884

David Eaton, D.D., 1884-1893

W. G. Swanson, M.A., 1894-1900 [He is W. S. Swanson.]

James Muir, M.A., 1900 — .

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ABERDEEN – NORTH

The minister of the north parish, and a large proportion of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. A church and school were soon erected. The church was largely used in connection with the revival of 1859-60.

Membership

1848, 450;

1900, 545.

Ministers

John Murray, D.D., 1843-1861

George Campbell, 1859-1873

George D. Low, M.A., 1873-1882

F. R. Barry, 1883 — .

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ABERDEEN – OLD MACHAR

Those in this parish who at the Disruption adhered to the Free Church formed a congregation, and the charge was sanctioned in 1844. The congregation worshipped in temporary premises until the new church was opened in July 1846. A manse also was provided. The proximity of the Cathedral and King’s College Chapel was against the development of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 259;

1900, 164.

Ministers

Alexander Anderson, M.A., 1843-1848 [-1847, Vol.1]

A. Edersheim, D.D., 1849-1863

Thomas Gardiner, 1863-1877

D. M. Macalister, 1878-1886 [Vol.1 says he was translated from here in 1885.]

D. MacLean, B.D., 1887-1900

Joseph Shillinglaw, B.D., 1900 — .

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ABERDEEN – QUEEN’S CROSS

This congregation began as a preaching station in 1877. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1880. The church was built, and opened in April 1881. The position of the church and the increasing population in the west end of the city favoured the development of the congregation.

Membership

1882, 169;

1900, 713.

Ministers

George Adam Smith, D.D., LL. D., 1882-1892

Martin Lewis, D.D., 1893 — .

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ABERDEEN – RUTHERFORD

For some years religious meetings were conducted by John Ross, handloom weaver, in his own house, and then in a school, in the Northfield district of the city. He was joined in 1848 by Alexander Laing, coachbuilder, and in 1850 a small mission hall was opened. The mission was taken over by the session of the East Church in 1863. The charge was sanctioned in 1868. A church was built, and opened in 1870, under the name of Rutherford Church. It was renovated in 1882, the hall being enlarged. In 1896 the church was reconstructed and enlarged.

Membership

1870, 203;

1900, 878.

Ministers

Alexander Yule, 1869-1878

James Dewar, 1879-1892

James S. Stewart, 1893 — .

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ABERDEEN – RUTHRIESTON

Mungo Fairley Parker retired from the East Church, Brechin, owing to ill-health, and came to reside at Bridge of Dee. There were no religious services in the district, and, having in great measure recovered, he began meetings for public worship, and continued them gratuitously till his death in 1867. The services were held first in a small house at Fords of Dee, granted by the local innkeeper, then in a cottage rented in Ruthrieston Road, and adapted for the purpose by the removal of partitions. A temporary wooden church was erected in 1859. The charge was sanctioned in 1871. In 1876 a church and hall were built beside Ruthrieston railway station. For some years the population of the district steadily increased. After Mr. Parker’s death the congregation owed much to the warm interest and help of Principal Lumsden.

Membership

1872, 80;

1900,315.

Minister

Robert Semple, 1872 — .

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ABERDEEN – ST. CLEMENT’S

The minister, and nearly the entire congregation of St. Clement’s, “came out” in 1843. On Dr. Spence’s return from the Assembly, of which he was a member, he found that a wooden place of worship had been erected. A futile attempt had been made to interdict the erection. In 1843 a church was built in Prince Regent Street. A new church, with halls and classrooms, was erected in 1883. The congregation, situated in the east end, suffered from the movement of better-to-do people westward, from the closing of important works, and changes among the industrial population.

Membership

1848, 1083;

1900, 761.

Ministers

Alexander Spence, D.D., 1843-1890

A. D. Donaldson, M.A., 1878 — .

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ABERDEEN – ST. COLUMBA’S, SPRING GARDENS

This Gaelic charge was originally known as Spring Gardens, and then as the Gaelic church. The minister and congregation “came out” at the Disruption. A church and manse were erected.

Membership

1848, 140;

1900, 167.

Ministers

Hugh Mackenzie, M.A., 1843-1859

Colin Sinclair, 1857-1862

George Macdonald, 1864-1898

A. F. Campbell, 1898 — .

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ABERDEEN – SOUTH

The minister and congregation of the south parish “came out in 1843. They built a church in 1843, in combination with the East and West Churches. A manse was built in 1869. In 1892 the church was sold for halls to the East Church, and a new church was erected. A new manse was bought in 1895.

Membership

1848, 1209;

1900, 1284.

Ministers

James Stewart, 1843-1846

John Bonar, D.D., 1846-1848

John Adam, D.D., 1849-1868 [In Vol.1 and under Glasgow – Wellpark, it says he was translated 1867.]

John M. Sloan, M.A., 1868-1878

G. H. Knight, 1878-1888

W. M. Clow, D.D., 1889-1897

W. M. Mackay, B.D., 1898 — .

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ABERDEEN – TORRY

Services were maintained here from the Disruption, and probationers were regularly employed from 1865. Church and manse were erected, and the charge was sanctioned in 1873. A new church and manse were built later in Victoria Road. The population of the district increased owing to the growth of the fishing industry and the opening of public works.

Membership

1874, 116;

1900, 437.

Ministers

William Innes, 1873-1879

Alexander Simpson, B.A., B.Sc., 1879-1885

Edward Brown, 1885 — .

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ABERDEEN – TRINITY

The minister and congregation of Trinity Church adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. A church was forthwith built in Crown Street.

Membership

1848, 803;

1900, 874.

Ministers

David Simpson, M.A., 1843-1864

W. H. Gualter, 1864-1877

A. Doak, M.A., 1879 — .

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ABERDEEN – UNION

The minister, and the greater part of the congregation of this quoad sacra church, “came out” in 1843. The church was exposed for sale, and, with the sanction of the Presbytery, the congregation purchased it. As the character of the district changed, the membership decreased.

Membership

1848, 890;

1900, 208.

Ministers

John Allan, 1843-1847 [Vol.1 says he retired in 1846 and died in 1885.]

R. Blackwood, 1847-1858 [Vol.1 says he retired 1857.]

A. M. Bannatyne, 1858-1890

G. MacMurray Ross, M.A., 1891 — .

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ABERDEEN – WEST

The minister and a large congregation “came out” of the West Church in 1843. They worshipped at first in the Congregational church, Blackfriars’ Street. They built a church in combination with the East and South Churches in 1843. It was opened in January 1844. From this they moved in 1865 owing to railway encroachment, and after worshipping in various places temporarily, they entered their new building in Union Street in 1869. A manse was secured at 34 Bon-Accord Terrace in 1875. It was sold in 1883.

Membership

1848,1150;

1900, 631.

Ministers

A. D. Davidson, D.D., 1843-1872

John Laidlaw, D.D., 1872-1881

G. W. Thomson, D.D., 1881-1900.

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ABERDEEN – WOODSIDE

The minister, and almost all the congregation of Woodside Chapel-of-Ease, “came out” in 1843. The church and manse were awarded to the Free Church by the law courts, on condition that it should undertake the burdens. A wooden structure—the “Timmer Kirkie”—was erected for use till the case was decided. Later, a hall was added to the church, and a mission hall was built in another part of the district. The congregation suffered heavily through industrial disaster in 1846, but it prospered with the improvement of the district.

Membership

1848, 813;

1900, 683.

Ministers

Robert Forbes, M.A., 1843-1859

A. F. Moir, M.A., 1860 —

Andrew Dickson, 1895 — .

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BANCHORY-DEVENICK

The founding of the Free Church here was mainly due to Alexander Thomson of Banchory, to whom the Free Church congregations in all the surrounding parishes were deeply indebted for counsel and help. Preparation had been made beforehand, and when the Disruption took place a congregation was at once organised. A church was erected, and opened in November 1843. The manse was built in 1844. A school and teacher’s house were added soon after. In 1864 the Free Church day school was closed, the teacher, Robert Gray, M.A., an elder in the Free Church, having been appointed parochial schoolmaster. The membership in 1844 was over 400, but the opening of daughter churches soon reduced it. In 1850 Mr. Thomson gave additional ground to the Free Church for a burying-place.

Membership

1848, 190;

1900, 188.

Ministers

D. F. Arthur, 1844-1893

J. Ironside Still, M.A., 1884 —

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BELHELVIE

A company who worshipped in the barn of a neighbouring farm formed the nucleus of this congregation. In July 1844 it was put in charge of an interim session. A church had been erected at Potterton in 1843. The charge was sanctioned by the Special Commission of Assembly in 1844. A two years’ vacancy, 1848-50, was adverse to the congregational interests. The church was reconstructed in 1883.

Membership

1848, 120;

1900, 121.

Ministers

Lewis Jack, 1845-1848

Patrick Calder, 1850-1857

James Johnstone, M.A., 1857 — .

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BLACKBURN

The congregation here was organised immediately after the Disruption. A site was secured, on which the walls of an old distillery were such that they could be utilised in building the church, which was forthwith erected. A manse also was provided.

Membership

1848, 200;

1900, 136.

Ministers

J. Macdonald, 1843-1899

J. A. Jaffray, 1896 — .

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BOURTREEBUSH

Services were provided here in 1843 under Fordoun Presbytery. In 1844 it was transferred to the Presbytery of Aberdeen. A church was erected in 1848. A vacancy occurred at Maryculter in 1850, and, after negotiations, in 1852, Maryculter and Bourtreebush were put under charge of one minister. In 1876 the two were disjoined, and the latter recognised as a station, in consideration of the fishing villages and landward population to be served by it The charge was sanctioned in 1882.

Membership

1848, 92;

1900, 108.

Ministers

Walter Calder, 1882-1886

W. Macdonald, M.A., 1887-1899

Alexander Duff Watson, B.D., 1900 — .

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CULTS

In accordance with a recommendation of Presbytery a church was built here in 1843, on a site offered by George Shirra Gibb of Cults. At first Cults was a station, superintended by the minister of Banchory-Devenick. It was found necessary, however, to recognise it as a separate station; and in 1860 it became a sanctioned charge. The manse was erected in 1863. The church was enlarged and a hall added in 1880. The manse was enlarged in 1887. Cults became a suburb of Aberdeen, with suburban railway and tramway car service.

Membership

1866, 119;

1900, 340.

Ministers

W. Anderson, 1861-1879

C. A. Salmond, D.D., 1879-1881

R. W. Barbour, M.A., 1881-1886

Hugh Morrison, D.D., 1887 — .

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DRUMOAK

A number of Free Church residenters erected a church here to supply local needs, and also to accommodate the growing numbers of summer visitors attracted to the place. A manse also was provided. The charge was sanctioned in 1880.

Membership

1881, 107;

1900, 144.

Ministers

W. M. Rankin, B.D., 1881-1888

W. M. Grant, M.A., 1888 — .

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DURRIS

Occasional services were held here after the Disruption. In 1852 the Presbytery established a mission. The congregation worshipped for a time in a smith’s shop. In 1856 a probationer was appointed. In that year the church was erected, and the manse in 1867. The charge was sanctioned in the latter year. Summer visitors increased the attendance in the months of July and August.

Membership

1868, 93;

1900, 62.

Ministers

John Hendry, 1868-1883

D. M. W. Laird, M.A., 1884 — .

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DYCE

A station was established by the Presbytery in this new and growing village in 1868. The church was built in 1869. The charge was sanctioned in 1870. The manse was erected in 1881, and a hall in 1894. The rapid growth of the village, owing to neighbouring industries and special railway facilities, was favourable to the progress of the congregation. Much was also due to the assistance of local landed proprietors in the early years.

Membership

1871, 126;

1900, 249.

Ministers

James Gage, B.D., 1870-1884 [In Vol.1 his surname is given as Gagge.]

James Anderson, 1884 — .

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KINGSWELLS

This congregation was formed in 1857, and a church was erected on a site presented to the congregation by Francis Edmond of Kingswells. The charge was sanctioned in 1861. The manse was erected in 1862-63. The church was several times renovated.

Membership

1880, 106;

1900, 93.

Ministers

William Keith, 1861-1868

A. Clark, M.A., 1868 — .

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MARYCULTER

The congregation here was formed at the Disruption. The charge was sanctioned in March 1844. The congregation worshipped in a barn at Whitestone, granted by James Gordon, the tenant of the farm, until the church was opened in August 1844. The manse was built in 1845. In 1852 Maryculter and Bourtreebush were united under the minister of Maryculter. In 1876, however, they were disjoined.

Membership

1848, 140;

1900, 69.

Ministers

George Ogilvie, B.D., 1844-1850

William Selbie, 1853-1895

J. A. Selbie, D.D., 1896 — .

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NEWHILLS

The congregation here was formed in 1843, and recognised as a station. A church was built near the village of Auchmull. A manse also was provided. The charge was sanctioned in 1844.

Membership

1848, 400;

1900, 588.

Ministers

J. E. Craven, 1845-1897 [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1879.]

J. A. Russell, M.A., 1879-1886

J. J. Chrystall, 1886 — .[Vol.1: A. J. Chrystall]

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PETERCULTER

The minister of the parish and many of his people “came out” in 1843. A church was erected within three months after the Disruption, and called Coutlaw Kirk. A manse also was provided. The church was vacated in 1895, but services continued to be held in it three times a year. The old manse was sold and a new one built with the proceeds. Peterculter church, manse, hall, and stables were all erected in 1895. The Free churches of Cults, Kingswells, and Drumoak were built for congregations which formed part of Peterculter congregation at Coutlaw Kirk.

Membership

1848, 332;

1900, 323.

Ministers

R. Thomson, 1843-1845

James Dalgarno, M.A., 1846-1888

Alexander MacMillan, 1886-1890

William Riddell, 1890-1891

John Kelman, D.D., 1891-1897 [Vol.1 says the translation took place in 1896.]

P. D. Thomson, M.A., 1897-1900.

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SKENE

The minister of the parish professed sympathy with the Evangelicals, but after some vacillation stayed in the Establishment at the Disruption. Many of his people, however, “came out,” and formed the Free Church congregation. Church and manse were built. The manse was afterwards enlarged, and a church hall was erected. The congregation suffered through the closing of a local wool factory, and the depopulation of the district.

Membership

1848, 313;

1900, 156.

Ministers

W. Trail, 1843-1849

R. H. Ireland, 1850-1861

J. M. Mackintosh, 1862-1879

William Innes, 1879 — .

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49. PRESBYTERY OF KINCARDINE O’NEIL

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ABOYNE

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, and occasional services provided. A church and manse were built in 1843-44, in the parish of Birse, about a mile from the village of Aboyne. Until the church was opened, services were held in the sawmill of Aboyne. In 1859 the congregation moved to a new church, more conveniently situated for the majority of the people, in the village of Charlestown. Aboyne became a fashionable summer resort. An endowment yielding about £30 annually was vested by the first minister in the hands of the Sustentation Fund Committee for behoof of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 113;

1900, 128.

Ministers

W. Robertson, M.A., 1844-1870

A. H. Moir, 1871-1899

A. W. Wishart, M.A., 1899 — .

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BALLATER

A congregation was formed and supply provided for this district immediately after the Disruption. Interdicted from using a hall which they had secured, the congregation worshipped for a time in the open air; then in a sheep-cote where space was made by excavating the floor. The charge was sanctioned in the end of 1843. The only site that could be obtained was some distance from the village. There church and manse were erected. In 1869 a site in the village was secured, and a new church built.

Membership

1848, 135;

1900, 184.

Ministers

Donald Campbell, M.A., 1844-1878

A. F. A. Moir, 1876-1887

James Paterson, B.D., 1887-1889

James Cables, M.A., 1889-1897

John Cooper, B.D., 1898 — .

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BANCHORY-TERNAN

This congregation was formed at the Disruption, and met on the first Sunday after that event, in two divisions, in a small, derelict, Congregational church. Church and manse were erected in 1843-44. In 1880 a new church was built. The congregation suffered through decrease of the population owing to the removal of industries—railway work and timber-floating on the Dee. Durris and Drumoak Free churches were also opened in the district.

Membership

1848, 594;

1900, 341.

Ministers

[William Anderson is said to have been minister here at the Disruption. Vol.1]

R. Reid, M.A., 1843-1893

Alexander Miller, M.A., 1885-1886

D. S. Adam, D.D., 1886-1890

W. Cowan, 1891 — .

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BRAEMAR

The minister of the parish and about 180 people adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. They worshipped, first in the hall of the Fife Arms Hotel, then in a house built for a stable. A wooden church was erected with the permission of James, Earl of Fife, and opened in August 1843. A stone church was built in 1844-45. Mr. Macqueen having been ejected from his school in Castleton, the wooden church was fitted up as school and dwelling-house for him in 1846. The manse was built in 1848. Some of the timber for the church, and all the timber for the manse, was given from the Mar Forest. The congregation was greatly indebted to the factor, Mr. Cumming, for counsel and help. A new church was built in 1870, the old building being removed to Aberarder, for use as a mission hall.

Membership

1848, 78;

1900, 121.

Ministers

Farquhar M’Rae, 1843-1853

Hugh Cobban, 1854-1870

Thomas Siddie, M.A., 1871 — .

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CLUNY

A congregation was formed here at the Disruption, and a probationer placed in charge. They worshipped for a time in a barn on a neighbouring farm. The proprietor of the estate of Linton granted an extensive feu, at a nominal rent, on which church, manse, and school were built in 1843-44. The church stood in a rural district, with a United Presbyterian church less than a mile distant.

Membership

1848, 160;

1900, 141.

Ministers

James Forbes, 1844-1858

W. K. Mitchell, 1859-1871

James Nicoll, M.A., 1872-1883

William Cruikshank, M.A., 1883-1885

F. H. Georgeson, M.A., 1886-1888

Peter Taylor, M.A., 1888 — .

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CRATHIE

In 1849 a preaching station was established here. Services were held for a time in barns, corn-yards, etc. Great difficulty was found in obtaining a site for a place of worship. In 1853 a church was erected on a corner of land on the Abergeldie Estate, granted by the Prince Consort. Colonel Farquharson of Invercauld, in 1881, granted a site for church and manse. The manse was erected in 1883-84, Mr. Alexander, the minister, contributing £1000 towards the cost. In 1896, the lease of the old church having run out, it was pulled down, and a new church built beside the manse. Immediate proximity to a royal residence (Balmoral), and the influence cast in favour of the Established Church, operated to the disadvantage of the Free Church. Several legacies left by members yielded an annual interest of about £22, which went to the Sustentation Fund.

Membership

1871, 47;

1900, 36.

Ministers

John Dingwall, 1871-1875

W. B. Alexander, 1876-1881

David Ross, M.A., 1883-1892

William Souper, M.A., 1893 — .

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CROMAR (BRAES OF CROMAR AND COLDSTONE)

Immediately after the Disruption a congregation was formed here of the Free Church adherents in the “Braes of Cromar” and the parish of Logie-Coldstone. Services were at first held in a barn. Church and manse were erected in 1843-44. Donald Stewart, minister of the parish of Glengairn, in which lie the “Braes of Cromar,” “came out” at the Disruption. He was called by the new congregation; and as it was part of that he had previously ministered to, he was settled, but not inducted. The congregation suffered from rural depopulation.

Membership

1848, 125;

1900, 102.

Ministers

D. Stewart, 1844-1879

Alexander West, 1878 — .

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ECHT

The probationer stationed at Cluny after the Disruption gave regular services and pastoral work in Echt. The congregation here was organised in August 1843. They worshipped at first in a barn. The church was built in 1848. The charge was sanctioned in 1850. The manse was erected in 1851.

Membership

1854, 150;

1900, 112.

Ministers

Donald Mackay, 1851-1896 [Vol.1 says he resigned 1893 and died in 1896.]

W. M. Whyte, 1894 — .

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KINCARDINE O’NEIL

The congregation here was formed at the Disruption, and services were provided for the village of Kincardine O’Neil, and for Torphins. A church was erected near Craigmyle, and opened in November following. The manse was built in 1844. The congregation suffered from decrease of the rural population till about 1890, when the growth of Torphins improved matters again.

Membership

1848, 160;

1900, 112.

Ministers

Alexander Gatheror, 1844-1847

William Smith, M.A., 1848-1887 [Vol.1 says he was ordained 1849.]

Alexander Badenoch, M.A., 1887-1890

Andrew G. Millar, M.A., 1890 — .

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LUMPHANAN

This congregation was formed immediately after the Disruption, and a preacher was put in charge. The charge was sanctioned in October 1843. Church and manse were erected in 1844. A new manse was built in 1869, and a new church in 1870.

Membership

1848, 110;

1900, 143.

Ministers

A. Grant, 1844-1870

Thomas Stothart, 1865-1893

A. S. A. Bishop, 1889 — .

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MIDMAR

This congregation, formerly Original Secession, joined the Church of Scotland in 1839. The minister and 92 members “came out” in 1843, carrying church and manse with them. At the first vacancy a fruitless attempt was made to unite this charge with Lumphanan. At the next vacancy it was reduced to a preaching station; but four years later sanction was restored. Considerable alterations were made on both church and manse.

Membership

1848, 110;

1900, 133.

Ministers

James M’Gowan, 1843-1844 [In Vol.1 his surname is M’Gown.]

W. Scott Hay, 1845-1851

Thomas Murray, 1857-1896

Gilbert Buchanan, B.D., 1897 — .

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STRACHAN

The minister of the parish and many of his congregation “came out” in 1843. Church and manse were erected that year. A hall was built in 1864 on Finzean Estate, in the parish of Birse, where services were held fortnightly in summer and monthly in winter. The population declined through the absorption of crofts in larger farms, and other causes.

Membership

1848, 314;

1900, 110.

Ministers

D. S. Fergusson, M.A., 1843-1897

W. J. Hardy, M.A., 1882-1884

J. C. Laing, 1885 — .

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TARLAND

In response to a request from local adherents of the Free Church this congregation was organised in March 1844. It was proposed to place it under charge of the minister at Cromar; but this was departed from, and a missionary appointed. The church was erected in 1848. A manse also was provided. The charge was sanctioned in 1859.

Membership

1861, 104;

1900, 99.

Ministers

Robert Stewart, 1860-1867

James Smith, M.A., 1867 — ,

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50. PRESBYTERY OF ALFORD

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ALFORD

In November 1843 supply was provided for the parishes of Tullynessle and Alford, under supervision of a neighbouring minister. A probationer was appointed in 1863. At the outset, the congregation suffered much from the hostility of the proprietor. He forbade the use of a barn which Mr. Hay, one of the members, was ready to grant. He refused any site for a place of worship, although specially appealed to by the Presbytery. He secured their ejection from a shed belonging to the Aberdeen Commercial Company, complaining that it was being used for other than commercial purposes. They worshipped on the highwayside for two years, summer and winter, and then in a barn of Mr. Hay’s, over which the proprietor had no control, although he tried to have them ejected from that also. Finally he relented and granted a site in the east end of the village. The charge was sanctioned in 1866. The church was erected in 1867, and the manse in 1870. A hall was built in the parish of Tullynessle in 1885. The meal and cloth mills at Montgarrie, a mile from Alford, and the making of Alford the terminus of the railway, thus adding to the population, favoured the growth of the congregation.

Membership

1868, 106:1900, 191.

Ministers

J. Rainnie, M.A., 1867-1871

W. G. Brander, M.A., 1871-1896

J. M. E. Ross, M.A., 1896 — .

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AUCHENDOIR

The congregation here was formed immediately after the Disruption. The church was built in 1844, and the manse in 1848. The congregation suffered through rural depopulation, the closing of the freestone quarries, and the decline of the timber trade. The Free and United Presbyterian congregations here united in 1886, when Mr. Nicoll required a colleague, the United Presbyterian minister, Mr. Stark, resigning to facilitate the union. The united congregation then numbered 112. A new church was built in 1890.

Membership

1848, 145;

1900, 139.

Ministers

Harry Nicoll, M.A., 1843-1891

Thomas Laing, 1887 — .

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KEIG AND TOUGH

The congregation was formed here immediately after the Disruption. The charge was sanctioned in February 1844. No site convenient for both sections of the congregation could at first be obtained. The Keig portion worshipped in a wooden building erected on a site kindly granted by Sir Andrew Leith Hay, of Leith Hall, Kennethmont; the Tough portion in a barn. At length, in 1846, a suitable site was granted by Lord Forbes, and church and manse were erected. A large part of the original congregation went to Alford when that charge was erected in 1866. Depopulation seriously affected the prosperity of the congregation, while territorial influence was cast strongly against the Free Church.

Membership

1848, 227;

1900, 121.

Ministers

W. P. Smith, D.D., 1845-1890

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KENNETHMONT

One elder and a considerable part of the congregation of the parish church “came out” at the Disruption, and formed the Free Church congregation. Church and manse were forthwith erected. In course of time numbers of Congregationalists joined the Free Church.

Membership

1848, 250

1900, 115

Ministers

Donaldson Rose, M.A., 1843-1860

John Elmslie, M.A., 1862-1866

John Coutts, M.A., 1867-1881

Thomas Mathieson, 1882 — [Vol.1 says this was 1881.]

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RHYNIE

A congregation was formed here at the Disruption. In November 1843 it was put under the superintendence of a neighbouring minister. Services were held in a wooden church, hastily erected at the Disruption, outside the parish. A manse was purchased in 1849. It was the birthplace of “Mackay of Uganda,” whose father was the first minister of the church. At length, in 1851, a site was obtained in the village, and the church erected. When the first minister retired, the charge was reduced to a station. Sanction was restored in 1871. The congregation suffered seriously through depopulation of the district.

Membership

1848, 168;

1900, 97.

Ministers

Alexander Mackay, LL. D., 1844-1867

Andrew Nicol, M.A., 1871-1872

A. Bisset, M.A., 1872-1874

Thomas Bruce, 1875-1899

W. S. Laing, M.A.. 1898 — .

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STRATHDON AND GLENBUCHAT

The Free Church residents in this district were at first served by a catechist, under the superintendence of a neighbouring minister. Strathdon was then connected with Towie; but in 1850 Strathdon and Glenbuchat were combined as a station. After great difficulty and much discouragement a site was obtained at Balnacraig in 1861, and church and manse were erected. In that year the proprietor permitted the erection of a wooden structure for the section of the congregation at Strathdon. The charge was sanctioned in 1866. Not till 1890 was a site granted, and a church erected at Strathdon. The congregation encountered great opposition. Those who joined the Free Church were persecuted, and many left the district. The population steadily declined. There were endowments yielding £27 per annum. Mr. Fullarton bequeathed to the congregation £400, in which his widow was liferented.

Membership

1868, 98;

1900, 74.

Ministers

A. C. Fullarton, 1866-1870

John Rainnie, M.A., 1871-1876

J. H. Allan, 1876-1881

James Smith, 1882-1885

William Profeit, M.A., 1885 — .

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TOWIE AND CUSHNIE

In November 1843 services were provided for the Free Church residents in Towie and Leochel Cushnie, under the charge of neighbouring ministers. Towie was at first associated with Glenbuchat, and part of Leochel Cushnie with Lumphanan. Church and manse were built at Towie in the early “fifties.” At Leochel Cushnie, also, a church was soon erected. The double charge of Towie and Cushnie was sanctioned in 1856. A large addition was made to the manse in 1861. The population of the district steadily declined.

Membership

1859, 91;

1900, 82.

Ministers

D. A. Beattie, 1858-1867

J. M. Shirreffs, 1867-1878

A. M. Forbes, M.A., 1878-1891

A. M. Macdonald, M.A., 1891 — .

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