Congregations 1


 


1. PRESBYTERY OF EDINBURGH

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CORSTORPHINE

David Horn, minister of the parish in 1843, did not adhere to the Free Church, but many of the parishioners “came out”; and at the first meeting of the Free Church Presbytery of Edinburgh steps were taken to constitute a congregation in Corstorphine. Sabbath services were held, first in Lind’s Flour Store, and then in a tent. By the month of August 1843 a movement had been begun which resulted in the erection of a church. Dr. George Burns, late of Tweedsmuir, was put in charge in October, and in January 1844 he was settled as minister. The church was opened in 1845, remodelled in 1869, and enlarged in 1889. The manse was built in 1847. The population of Corstorphine increased from 1579 in 1861 to 2816 in 1900.

Membership

1845, 130;

1900, 285.

Ministers

George Burns, D.D., 1844-1876
James Morrison, 1865 — .

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CRAMOND

Dr. George Muirhead, minister of the parish, then in his eightieth year, with a large part of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. The parish covered a wide area, lying partly in each of the adjoining counties of Edinburgh and Linlithgow. The eastern section of the congregation met for the first time on May 21, 1843, in the Schoolhouse, Davidson’s Mains. The western section met first in a barn at Braehead, and afterwards in a barn at the farm of Fair-a-far. By decision of Presbytery the church was placed in Davidson’s Mains. It was opened on December 17, 1843. A school and schoolhouse were built in 1846. The manse was erected in 1853, and enlarged in 1899.

Membership

1846, 167;

1900, 282.

Ministers

George Muirhead, D.D., 1843-1847

Alexander Campbell Fraser, LL. D., etc., 1844-1846

James Smith, 1847-1894

David Gibb Mitchell, 1890 — .

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EDINBURGH – BARCLAY

By the Will of Miss Mary Barclay, who died in 1858, a sum of £10,000 was set apart for the building of a church in Edinburgh in connection with the Free Church. The church was erected on a site at Wright’s Houses, and opened in 1864. In 1865 James Hood Wilson and his congregation at Fountainbridge were transferred to the new church. The buildings, comprising church, halls, and church officer’s house, cost more than the legacy provided, the excess being met by the congregation. A manse was acquired at 1 East Castle Road, and mission halls in Grove Street. The Barclay Church has fostered several new congregations.

Membership

1866, 831;

1900, 1080.

Ministers

James Hood Wilson, D.D., 1865 — [Vol.1 says 1864.]

W. M. Clow, D.D., 1897 — .

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EDINBURGH – BUCCLEUCH

Dr. Patrick Clason was minister of the chapel-of-ease in connection with St. Cuthbert’s parish, known as Buccleuch Church, in 1843. He, with most of his congregation, “came out,” and formed the Free Buccleuch Church. At first the congregation worshipped in a building at the east end of Buccleuch Place. The handsome new church, immediately opposite the original Established church, was opened in 1865. The congregation was united with that of Greyfriars’ in 1897. This congregation did not enter the Union of 1900.

Membership

The figures which are in possession of the Free Church have been refused.

Ministers

Patrick Clason, D.D., 1843-1867

Robert Gordon, 1854-1900

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EDINBURGH – BUCCLEUCH AND GREYFRIARS’

.

See EDINBURGH – BUCCLEUCH and EDINBURGH – GREYFRIARS’.

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EDINBURGH – COWGATE

After the Disruption Lady Effingham supported a mission in the Cowgate district. About 1852 the Free New North congregation assumed responsibility for this work. In 1853 “Mary’s Chapel” became the centre of operations. In 1858, two hundred and fifty adherents having been gathered, the Presbytery granted leave to dispense sealing ordinances in the mission. The charge was sanctioned in 1859. Mr. John Pirie, the missionary, became the first minister; and very soon a new church was built.

Membership

1860, 177;

1900, 842.

Ministers

J. Pirie, 1859-1878 [Vol.1 says he was translated 1879.]

Charles Wedderburn, 1879 — .

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EDINBURGH – COWGATEHEAD

Mr. William Whyte, bookseller in Edinburgh, made provision in his Will for the erection and partial endowment of a Territorial Church in the district known as Cowgatehead, expressing the wish that his son-in-law, Mr. Thomas Smith, missionary at Calcutta, should be its first minister. In 1858, with the approval of the Presbytery, Mr. Smith began work in the district. The Assembly of 1859 sanctioned the charge, and the building of the church was at once proceeded with. In 1891 it was seen that readjustments were desirable, and in 1893 the congregation was united with that of Free St. John’s; the church and hall at Cowgatehead becoming the mission premises of the united congregations.

Membership

1869, 110;
1891, 146.

Ministers

Thomas Smith, D.D., LL. D., 1859-1880

J. Moir Porteous, D.D., 1881-1891

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EDINBURGH – CRAIGMILLAR PARK

This church was originally known as Henderson Church; then as the Free Tron; and finally, since 1898, as Craigmillar Park. See EDINBURGH – TRON.

Membership

1898, 175;

1900, 235.

Ministers

John Fleming, 1865 —

James Rutherford, B.D., 1896 — .

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EDINBURGH – DALRY

Concerned for the welfare of the growing industrial population in the Dalry district, in 1877 the Presbytery obtained the co-operation of the deacons’ court of Free St. George’s, who undertook the responsibility of starting a new charge there. The Assembly gave it sanction the same year. Mr. Rodger was transferred from Stockbridge to Dalry in 1878. The hall was first erected, and here the congregation worshipped for three years. The church was opened for worship in the spring of 1882. A manse was purchased in 1900. Originally the church stood in the suburbs, a stretch of waste land lying beyond. It is now far within the city boundary.

Membership

1879, 267;

1900, 802.

Ministers

Alexander Rodger, 1878-1893

Alexander Aitken, 1894 — . [Under Yester it says he was translated in 1893.]

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EDINBURGH – DEAN

At the Disruption Mr. James Manson was minister of the quoad sacra parish of the Dean. He, with practically the whole of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church. Like other quoad sacra ministers, Mr. Manson was interdicted from occupying and preaching in the church which the congregation themselves had built and supported. They first met for worship in a granary. A church was built in Lynedoch Place, and opened for service in December 1844. Free St. Andrew’s Church having been transferred to a site in close proximity, it was found necessary to remove. A new church was built at Belford Bridge, and opened on October 3, 1889. A manse was bought in 1863, and sold again in 1896.

Membership

1880, 249;

1900, 330.

Ministers

James Manson, 1843-1848

Thomas Brown, D.D., 1849-1893

Archibald Bell, 1886 — .

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EDINBURGH – FOUNTAINBRIDGE

From 1848 mission work was done by Free St. George’s congregation in Fountainbridge district. In 1853 the mission was raised to the status of a sanctioned charge, James Hood Wilson being the first minister. A church was built and opened for worship in 1854. Galleries were afterwards added; and later, the “Chalmers Hall,” gifted by Miss Helen Jemima Chalmers, daughter of Dr. Thomas Chalmers, was erected. When Dr. Wilson left in 1865, to form a new congregation, the most of the people went with him. His successor, Mr. Morgan, headed a second migration, in 1872, to Viewforth. Fountainbridge was then reduced to a preaching station, but restored in 1874 to the status of a sanctioned charge.

Membership

1866, 750;

1900, 600.

Ministers

James Hood Wilson, D.D., 1854-1865 [Vol.1 says 1864.]

John Morgan, 1865-1872

R. M. Massey, M.A., 1874-1882

George D. Low, M.A., 1882 — .

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EDINBURGH – GORGIE

After mission work had been conducted in the district for several years, Gorgie was recognised as a Territorial Mission, and William Kilpatrick, M.A., probationer, took charge of the mission in December 1887. It was raised to the status of a sanctioned charge in 1891. The Sunday school and meetings were for a time held in the old school of the village. In 1887 the hall known as “The Little Church in the Field “ was built. The church on Slateford Road was erected, and opened in May 1896. Gorgie is now included within the city boundaries. In the closing years of the century the population greatly increased.

Membership

1888, 61;

1900, 609.

Minister

William Kilpatrick, M.A., 1891 — -.

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EDINBURGH – GRANGE

[This Church was properly designated “Chalmers’ Memorial”; but it soon came to be called “Grange” in all official publications; and by this name it is generally known.]

Among the increasing population in the Grange district the Free Church people felt the need for a convenient place of worship. In 1863 services were begun by the Rev. Professor Smeaton, D.D., in Clare Hall, Findhom Place. The Assembly sanctioned the settlement of a minister in 1865, and in June of that year Dr. Horatius Bonar, of Kelso, was inducted to the charge. The church in Grange Road was erected and opened for service on December 6, 1866. Mission halls and classrooms were built in Causewayside. The monthly evening service for children was a notable feature in Dr. Bonar’s day.

Membership

1868, 290;

1900, 507.

Ministers

Horatius Bonar, D.D., 1866-1889

John M. Sloan, M.A., 1887 — .

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EDINBURGH – GREYFRIARS’

The ministers of both Old and New Greyfriars’, with most of their people, “came out” at the Disruption. James Julius Wood, minister of New Greyfriars’, was for a time laid aside by illness. The two congregations, therefore, united under John Sym, minister of Old Greyfriars’. They worshipped in different halls, and also in Buccleuch Free Church, until their church in Graham Street was opened in November 1884. The congregation united with that of Buccleuch in 1897, and their church was sold.

Membership

1848, 454; 1897, 248.

Ministers

John Sym, 1843-1855

James Julius Wood, D.D., 1843-1844

William Chalmers, 1855-1857

Hugh Martin, D.D., 1858-1863

Robert Taylor, 1864-1867

Archibald Smellie, 1868-1886

D. M. Macalister, 1886 — [Vol.1 says he was translated here in 1885.]

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EDINBURGH – GUTHRIE MEMORIAL

This congregation dates from October 1880, when Mr. John Pirie, formerly of Cowgate Free Church, commenced work in Burns’ Hall, Abbeymount, in the midst of a rapidly increasing industrial population. The Assembly sanctioned the charge in 1881. Mr. Pirie was settled as minister, and a church was built in Easter Road. A manse at 30 Pilrig Street was purchased in 1897.

Membership

1881, 147;

1900, 699.

Ministers

John Pirie, 1881-1894

A. St. Clair Sutherland, M.A., 1894—

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EDINBURGH – HIGH

At the Disruption both ministers of the High Kirk, Dr. Gordon and Dr. James Buchanan, adhered to the Free Church. In 1845 Dr. Gordon became sole pastor. For some time the congregation worshipped in the Music Hall, George Street. As part of the general plan of the New College buildings, a church was erected at the head of the Mound, and opened in 1850. Mission premises were secured in the Lawnmarket. The district, which was mainly residential, rapidly changed in character; hotels, offices, warehouses, etc., taking the places of the old dwellings.

Membership

1848, 778;

1900, 415.

Ministers

Robert Gordon, D.D., 1843-1853

James Buchanan, D.D., 1843-1845

Robert Rainy, D.D., 1854-1862

William Arnot, 1863-1875

Walter C. Smith, D.D., LL. D., 1876 —

Robert Stephenson Simpson, D.D., 1896 — .

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EDINBURGH – HOLYROOD

This congregation was started as a mission, in 1846, through the liberality of the Duchess of Gordon, under supervision of the minister and session of Free St. Luke’s. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1849. The church, at the foot of the Canongate, was built and opened in 1850; and a manse was secured at 1 St. John’s Hill. Later, the manse was sold, and a new manse purchased at 23 Spring Gardens.

Membership

1859, 318;

1900, 463.

Ministers

William Balfour, D.D., 1849-1895

Peter Macdonald, B.D., 1896 — .

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EDINBURGH – KNOX’S

At the Disruption, William Nisbet, minister of New Street quoad sacra parish, and many of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church. For some years they worshipped in Leith Wynd Chapel, Macdowall Street. A church was built on a site adjacent to John Knox’s House in High Street, and opened in 1851. To the new church the name “Knox’s” was given.

Membership

1848, 400;

1900, 386.

Ministers

William Nisbet, 1843-1869

John M’Ewan, D.D., 1863 —

F. Gordon MacLeod, 1900 — .

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EDINBURGH – LADY GLENORCHY’S

In 1843, Dr. G. Ramsay Davidson, minister of Lady Glenorchy’s quoad sacra parish, and all the congregation, except two persons, joined the Free Church. The intention of Lady Glenorchy, who built the church in 1774, was that it should be in communion with, but independent of, the Church of Scotland, without a parish or legal endowment. In 1839, the original constitution having been altered by Act of Parliament, a quoad sacra parish was assigned to Lady Glenorchy’s Chapel, under the Chapels Act, 1834. The trustees believed that by the repeal of the Chapels Act the chapel reverted to its independent position, and continued the congregation in possession. In 1844 an action by the Presbytery of Edinburgh was decided in its favour, against the trustees, and the congregation was ejected in November 1844. They worshipped in the hall of the High School, until the church, built in Greenside Place, was opened in May 1846. A week-day school, founded by Lady Glenorchy, was carried on by the congregation until 1897. It ceased as the endowment was insufficient to meet modern requirements.

Membership

1846, 750;

1900, 704.

Ministers

G. Ramsay Davidson, D.D., 1843-1890 [Vol.1 says he retired 1880.]

Alexander Cusin, M.A., 1865-1890

James Harvey, M.A., 1890 — .

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EDINBURGH – M’CRIE

The Davie Street Original Secession Church united with the Free Church in 1852, and in 1858 it took the name of M’Crie Church. It was reduced to the status of a mission station by the Commission of Assembly in August 1885. In 1886 the congregation of M’Crie Church united with that of Roxburgh Church. The united congregation took rank as a sanctioned charge, under the designation of M’Crie-Roxburgh.

Membership

1855, 288; 1885, 182.

Ministers

Thomas M’Crie, D.D., LL. D., 1852-1856

Robert Philip, M.A., 1857-1890 [Under Dunbarney, it says that he was translated in 1858.]

Neil Patrick Rose, M.A., 1880-1886 [Vol.1 says he retired in 1885.]

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EDINBURGH – M’CRIE-ROXBURGH

This congregation was formed in 1886, by the union of M’Crie and Roxburgh congregations. Roxburgh Church was sold, and the united congregation worshipped in M’Crie Church. See EDINBURGH – M’CRIE and EDINBURGH – ROXBURGH.

Membership

1886, 294;

1900, 425.

Ministers

John M’Neill, 1886-1889

John Robertson, 1889-1891

James Stirling, 1891 — .

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EDINBURGH – MARTYRS’

The Reformed Presbyterian Congregation worshipping in Martyrs’ Church, George IV. Bridge, along with their minister, Dr. W. H. Goold, took part in the union of the Reformed Presbyterian Church with the Free Church in 1876. They carried their church buildings with them.

Membership

1877, 270;

1900, 185.

Ministers

W. H. Goold, D.D., 1876-1897

John Davidson, M.A., 1896 — .

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EDINBURGH – MAYFIELD

Services for the residents in this “large and growing suburb” of Edinburgh were begun by the Rev. Professor Blaikie, D.D., in 1875, in Clare Hall, Minto Street. The nucleus of a congregation having been formed, a site was secured and church hall erected at the corner of West Mayfield and Mayfield Road, where services were continued. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1876. The church was built and opened for service in May 1879, the spire being added in 1894. A manse was purchased in 1884. A mission was conducted in the Buccleuch Street district. The Boys’ Brigade proved a remarkable success.

Membership

1877, 73;

1900, 647.

Ministers

James T. Stuart, M.A., 1877-1885

Lewis Davidson. D.D., 1884 — .

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EDINBURGH – MORAY

Miss Helen Thomson of Westbarns Mains bequeathed funds for the erection and endowment of a Territorial Church in Edinburgh. Her trustees erected the church on ground connected with Moray House, Canongatc. At their suggestion Mr. Gall, who had commended himself by his work in the district, was licensed. He held services in the hall of the Training College, Moray House, until the church was completed, and in April 1862 he was ordained to the charge. The congregation from the first carried on effective mission work in the district.

Membership

1864, 47;

1900, 522.

Ministers

James Gall, 1862-1872 [Vol.1 gives the dates 1861-1871.]

W. D. Glendinning, 1872-1881

P. W. Paterson, 1881 — .

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EDINBURGH – MORNINGSIDE

Thomas Addis, minister of Morningside quoad sacra parish, with many of his people, “came out” in 1843. For a few Sabbaths they worshipped in the house of Dr. Chalmers, Churchhill, filling rooms and lobbies, while the minister preached from the staircase. During the summer they met in a tent erected in a neighbouring field. In winter they obtained the use of a schoolroom which before had been refused. The new church was opened in January 1844. Thirty years later it was enlarged and remodelled. A larger church was erected in 1894, on the opposite side of the street. Dr. Chalmers was connected with this church during his later years, and here his great scheme—the Sustentation Fund—was first started.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900,676.

Ministers

Thomas Addis, D.D., 1843-1899

Alexander Martin, D.D., 1884-1897

David Fairweather, M.A., 1898 — .

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EDINBURGH – NEWINGTON

James Begg, minister of Liberton, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. A site could not be secured for a new church in Liberton. With the support of four elders from Liberton, and four from Newington quoad sacra parish, the minister of which did not “come out,” Mr. Begg formed the congregation of Newington Free Church; and the building in South Clerk Street was opened in November 1843. A manse was secured, first in Cumin Place, then, later, at 34 Blacket Place. The church buildings have been frequently altered, classrooms, etc., being added. Originally standing in green fields, the church was soon built around, and included within the city.

Membership

1850, 608;

1900, 460.

Ministers

James Begg, D.D., 1843-1883

William Whyte Smith, B.D., 1885 — .

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EDINBURGH – NEW NORTH

Charles J. Brown, minister of New North Church, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. He and those who followed him worshipped for some months in Dr. Lindsay Alexander’s church, Argyle Square; then till 1846, in Brighton Street Chapel, and after that in Potterrow United Secession Church, till their own church in Forrest Road was opened, in 1848. The congregation fostered the work in the Cowgate until it reached the status of a sanctioned charge; then they turned to a district near the church, where excellent mission premises were erected. The New North long had a connection with student life. The Students’ Services initiated by Dr. Kelman formed a strong feature of its work.

Membership

1848, 650;

1900, 560.

Ministers

Charles J. Brown, D.D., 1843-1884

Andrew Crichton, B.A., 1860-1866

Robert G. Balfour, D.D., 1866 —

John Kelman, D.D., 1897 — . [Vol.1 says the translation took place in 1896.]

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EDINBURGH – PILRIG

As the result of a movement begun before the Disruption by a number of members who adhered to the Free Church, a church was built at the corner of Pilrig Street and Spey Street and opened in August 1843. The Committee of Subscribers nominated as first minister, William Garden Blaikie of Drumblade. Placed in the midst of a growing population, the congregation rapidly increased, and the handsome church at the corner of Pilrig Street and Leith Walk was built and opened in 1863. Church halls were added in 1893. A day school, built in James Street in 1845, was maintained till 1871. The building was then sold, the scholars being transferred by the Board to Leith Walk School.

Membership

1848, 250;

1900, 651.

Ministers

William Garden Blaikie, D.D.. 1844-1868

James Calder Macphail, D.D., 1868-1898 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1898.]

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EDINBURGH – PLEASANCE

Mission work in this district was begun in 1852 by the congregation of St. John’s, under Dr. Hanna. In 1853 the school building at St. John’s Hill was opened, and served for a time as church and day school. The church was built, and opened in 1859. In that year the Assembly sanctioned the charge, and leave, unsuccessfully applied for in 1858, was given to license and ordain the missionary, Thomas Cochrane, who had been in charge of the station. Such was the growth of the congregation that in 1873 larger accommodation became necessary, and the Independent Church, Richmond Place, was purchased. A manse was bought in 1865, in Rankeillor Street, and sold again some years later. The Pleasance Church owed very much to the fostering care and liberality of St John’s congregation. Dr. Hanna raised an endowment fund of £1050, for augmentation of the minister’s stipend. During Mr. Cochrane’s ministry about 6000 who had no church connection were added to the Church. He celebrated 3424 marriages—a yearly average of over 85.

Membership

1860, 254;

1900, 860.

Ministers

Thomas Cochrane, 1860 —

Thomas Wilson, 1896 — .

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EDINBURGH – QUEEN STREET

On March 25, 1891, St. Luke’s and Tolbooth congregations united under the ministry of Alexander Mackenzie, formerly minister of the Tolbooth. The united congregation took the name, Queen Street; St. Luke’s Church, in which they worshipped, standing in that thoroughfare. With part of the proceeds of sale of Tolbooth Church, hall, etc., were added, the balance forming a small endowment. In 1892, A. Moody Stuart, A. Mackenzie, J. G. Cunningham, and James Durran appear in the published returns as ministers of Queen Street Church—a unique instance of one church having four ministers. The district, formerly residential, changed greatly in later years, dwelling-houses giving place to offices and shops.

Membership

1893, 531;

1900, 623.

Ministers

A. Moody Stuart, D.D., 1891-1898

Alexander Mackenzie, D.D., 1891-1894

J. G. Cunningham, D.D., 1891 —

James Durran, M.A., 1892 — .

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EDINBURGH – RESTALRIG

This congregation was begun as a mission station under care of the Presbytery. David Paterson, B.D., was appointed missionary in 1889, and under him, in 1890, it became a sanctioned charge. The church was built with money left for the purpose by the late James Smith, a member of St. George’s, and opened for service in February 1892. The manse was built in 1895. The name of the congregation at first was Parsons Green; but to preserve the old parochial connection it was changed in 1892 to Restalrig.

Membership

1891, 117;

1900, 325.

Minister

David Paterson, B.D., 1890 — .

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EDINBURGH – ROSEBURN

To meet the needs of the increasing population in the extreme west of the city, a church extension movement was initiated by the kirk-session of Free St. George’s, and the services of A. G. MacGillivray were secured. The Assembly sanctioned the charge in 1866. The church was built, and opened on April 16, 1868. A manse was purchased in 1870, and a church hall was built in 1882. One of the first elders in the new congregation was Professor (afterwards Principal) Rainy.

Membership

1869, 140;

1900, 420.

Ministers

A. G. MacGillivray, M.A., 1866-1884 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1884 and died in 1889.]

David Somerville, D.D., 1885 — .

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EDINBURGH – ROXBURGH

Alexander Gregory, minister of Roxburgh quoad sacra parish, with many of his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. They were joined the same year by the Relief congregation from Roxburgh Terrace Church. Having to vacate their former premises, they worshipped for a time in Lancastrian School, Davie Street. A new church was built in Hill Square and opened in 1847. The first manse was at 3 Duncan Street. This was sold in 1868, and another bought in Blacket Place. In 1886 the congregations of Roxburgh and M’Crie churches were united as the M’Crie-Roxburgh Church.

Membership

1848, 258; 1886, 289.

Ministers

Alexander Gregory, 1843-1851

Alexander Topp, 1852-1858

Walter C. Smith, D.D., LL. D., 1858-1862

John Simpson, 1862-1872 [Vol.1 says he was translated 1863.]

John Gillison, 1872-1873

George Macaulay, 1874-1886.

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EDINBURGH – ST. ANDREW’S

At the Disruption Dr. David Ritchie and John Bruce were ministers of the collegiate charge of St. Andrew’s. Mr. Bruce, with one elder and about three hundred members, adhered to the Free Church. The congregation worshipped for a time in the Waterloo Rooms. The new church, entering from a porch at No. 80 George Street, was opened in 1844. The church in Drumsheugh Gardens was built and opened in 1886. A manse was secured at No. 35 Great King Street. Later, a more convenient house was purchased at No. 28 Walker Street. Mission work was done by the congregation in Stockbridge district, and as a result a congregation was formed there (see EDINBURGH – STOCKBRIDGE). Subsequently work was carried on in necessitous parts of the Pleasance and anongate.

Membership

1848, 521;

1900, 445.

Ministers

John Bruce, D.D., 1843-1880

Lewis Ferguson, 1871-1872

R. J. Sandeman, D.D., 1872 —

William M. Macgregor, D.D., 1898 — ;.

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EDINBURGH – ST. BERNARD’S

Alexander W. Brown, minister of the chapel-of-ease in West Claremont Street, with the majority of his elders and people, “came out” in 1843, and formed St. Bernard’s Free Church congregation. Until the church in Silvermills was ready for occupation, they worshipped in Tanfield Hall. Sundayschools were opened in five of the adjoining streets: Mr. Brown also taught classes for young men and young women at convenient hours on Sunday morning and week-day evenings. As the result of a movement in the congregation, led by the minister, for the establishment of a primary school in the northern district, a building was erected on ground adjoining the church, and trustees, including Adam Black, Lord Provost, and W. F. Skene, the historian, were appointed. The object was to provide “a sound classical and commercial education, based on religious principles,” open to children of parents of all denominations. The deacons’ court paid the fees of the very poor, and by means of a bursary encouraged promising lads to continue their education at the High School. When the school was taken over by the deacons’ court, the Trust Deed was adopted by the Committee of the Council on Education as “Model Trust Deed” for Free Church Schools in Scotland. The school was discontinued in 1874, the buildings being used as church halls. The brick church of 1843 was replaced by a new church built on the same site, opened in 1856. With the growth of the population, churches were multiplied in the district.

Membership

1848, 750;

1900, 568.

Ministers

Alexander W. Brown, 1843-1863

William Fraser, M.A., 1863-1880

John Sinclair, 1880-1884

George Steven, D.D., 1885 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. COLUMBA’S

At the Disruption James Noble, minister of the Gaelic chapel-of-ease, together with every member and adherent of his congregation, joined the Free Church. They were not required to leave the church till December 1843. Then they worshipped in the High School till February 1845, when they moved to the brick building in Lothian Road, vacated by Free St. George’s. The new church in Cambridge Street was built, and opened for service on May 16, 1851. In 1864 the name St Columba’s was adopted. Many coming from the Highlands turned naturally to St. Columba’s as their ecclesiastical home.

Membership1848, 416

1900, 468

Ministers

James Noble, M.A., 1840-1849 [Free Church minister from 1843]

Thomas MacLauchlan, LL. D., 1849-1886

Peter MacDonald, M.A., 1884-1895

Malcolm MacLennan, B.D., 1897 —

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EDINBURGH – ST. CUTHBERT’S or WEST

Dr Veitch, minister of St. Cuthbert’s, did not “come out” in 1843; but several elders of the parish adhered to the Free Church, and were constituted a session at first meeting of the Free Church Presbytery, with Dr. Clason as Moderator. For a time, by courtesy of Dr. Goold, they worshipped in the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Lady Lawson’s Wynd; then in the Riding School, Lothian Road; therafter in a school in Queensferry Street. After many disappointments, a minister, Robert Stirrat, was inducted in 1845; and shortly afterwards their church was built and opened for worship.

Membership

1848, 336;

1900, 365.

Ministers

Robert Stirrat, 1845-1852

Sir Henry W. Moncreiff, Bart., D.D., 1852-1883

Gavin Anderson, M.A., 1872-1877 [Vol.1 and Vol.2 under DUNDEE – HIGH says -1878.]

Robert Forrest, M.A., 1878-1898

George M. Reith, M.A., 1898 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. DAVID’S

Robert Ferguson, minister of St David’s, with the majority of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The church in Morrison Street was built in 1844 and rebuilt in 1859, when two halls were added behind. A manse was purchased in 1870, at No. 11 Viewforth Terrace. Later this was sold, and a house bought in Murrayfield Avenue. The district, originally suburban, greatly changed in character, and the church became a centre of aggressive Home Mission work.

Membership

1848, 285;

1900, 612.

Ministers

Robert Ferguson, M.A., 1843-1863 [Vol.1 has him there till his death in 1866.]

Jacob Scott Alexander, 1863-1894

Thomas Harvey, M.A., 1894 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. GEORGE’S

Dr. Robert S. Candlish, minister of the parish of St. George’s, had taken a prominent part in the Non-Intrusion controversy, and, along with many of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. As a place of worship they rented for a time a brick building in Lothian Road. A new church, on a site nearly opposite the entrance to the West Kirk, was opened in 1845. This building was bought up in 1866 by the Caledonian Railway Company, whose station covered the site. A new church was erected in Shandwick Place, and opened in 1869. The congregation has an honourable record for enterprise and liberality in the work of church extension in the western district of the city.

Membership

1848, 918;

1900, 1231.

Ministers

Robert Smith Candlish, D.D., 1843-1873

James Oswald Dykes, D.D., 1861-1865

Alexander Whyte, D.D., LL. D., 1870 —

Hugh Black, D.D., 1896 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. JAMES

This congregation originated in meetings held on Sunday evenings in a house in Wardie Crescent. In October 1874 the Presbytery constituted a preaching station, and an iron church was built in December following. In 1876 the charge was sanctioned by the Assembly. The iron church was replaced by the building erected in 1881, a hall being added later. As the population increased several other churches were opened in the district. At first the congregation was called “Granton and Wardie.”

Membership

1877, 115;

1900, 290.

Ministers

P. C. Purves, 1876 —

T. L. Ritchie, 1899 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. JOHN’S

Dr. Thomas Guthrie, minister of St. John’s, and his congregation, joined the Free Church at the Disruption. In the new church built at the corner of Johnston Terrace and opened in 1845, the congregation enjoyed a period of great prosperity under Dr. Guthrie and his successor, Dr. Hanna. With the shifting of the population the character of the district changed, and the church became a centre of Home Mission work. With a view to the more successful prosecution of this enterprise, the congregation of Cowgatehead was united with St. John’s in 1893; the Cowgatehead buildings serving as mission premises.

Membership

1848, 700; 1893, 311.

Ministers

Thomas Guthrie, D.D., 1843-1873

William Hanna, D.D., LL. D., 1850-1882

George Philip, D.D., 1866 —

Robert L. Jaffrey, M.A., 1893 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. LUKE’S

Alexander Moody (afterwards Dr. Alexander Moody Stuart), minister of St. Luke’s quoad sacra parish, with his congregation, “came out” in 1843. On a prominent site in Queen Street a new church was built and opened in 1852. In 1891 the congregation united with that of the Tolbooth, the united congregation worshipping in St. Luke’s building, under the name of EDINBURGH – QUEEN STREET.

Membership

1848, 578; 1890, 367.

Ministers

A. Moody Stuart, D.D., 1843-1891

J. G. Cunningham, D.D., 1876-1891.

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EDINBURGH – ST. MARY’S

At the Disruption Dr. Henry Grey, minister of St. Mary’s, and a large portion of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church. A new church was built in Barony Street. In 1862 the congregation moved to the building which had been erected in Albany Street. A member gifted a house in Albany Street for a manse. In 1874 this was sold, and a manse purchased in Bellevue Crescent. The district was originally residential. The population drifted largely to the west and south, and the church became surrounded by offices, warehouses, boarding-houses, etc. D. O. Hill, R.S.A., painter of the “F’irst General Assembly of the Free Church,” was a deacon in St. Mary’s.

Membership

1848, 330;

1900, 825.

Ministers

Henry Grey, D.D., 1843-1859

Thomas Main, D.D., 1857-1881

George Davidson, B.Sc., 1883 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. PAUL’S

This church, built mainly at the expense of Miss Agnes Hunter, Glencorse, was so held that it remained the property of the congregation when, with their minister, Robert Elder, they joined the Free Church at the Disruption. A manse was secured at No. 13 Dryden Place. Schoolrooms, built during Dr. Hetherington’s ministry, were subsequently used as church halls. Social conditions greatly altered in the district through drifting of the population to the suburbs.

Membership

1848, 500;

1900, 537.

Ministers

Robert Elder, D.D., 1843-1847

W. M. Hetherington, D.D., 1848-1857

George Brown, 1857-1873

Andrew Ryrie, 1874-1876

W. M. Falconer, M.A., 1876 — .

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EDINBURGH – ST. STEPHEN’S

Dr. William Muir, minister of the parish, “during the Ten Years’ Conflict, had warmly espoused the Non-Intrusion cause,” but, shrinking from the sacrifice involved, did not “come out” in 1843. An unsuccessful attempt was made by the adherents of the Free Church in the parish, in combination with the congregation of St. Cuthbert’s, to obtain the services of Dr. James Buchanan. A temporary place of worship was then secured in Straiton House, Wemyss Place. Dr. Buchanan was inducted in March 1845; but removed to a professorship in May following. In 1846 the property, part of which was occupied as temporary premises, was purchased, and adapted for congregational use. Mission work was conducted in Jamaica Street.

Membership

1848, 491;

1900, 423.

Ministers

James Buchanan, D.D., LL. D., 1845 (March-May)

Francis Cowan Gillies, 1846-1862

Edward Anderson Thomson, D.D., 1862-1890

William Alexander Sim, 1887-1890

Hunter Smith, M.A., 1891 — .

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EDINBURGH – SOUTH MORNINGSIDE

This congregation took its rise in services which were begun in Morningside Drive Hall, in January 1889. The Assembly of that year sanctioned the charge, and Charles A. Salmond, M.A., was inducted in January 1890 as first minister. From September 1889 the congregation worshipped in the church hall which had been built at the corner of Braid Road and Cluny Drive. The church was erected and opened for service in June 1892.

Membership

1890, 112;

1900, 500.

Minister

Charles A. Salmond, D.D., 1890 — .

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EDINBURGH – STOCKBRIDGE

In 1865 mission work was begun in this district by Free St. Andrew’s congregation. A mission hall was built, which was also used as a day-school. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1868, certain office-bearers in St. Andrew’s Church guaranteeing a stipend of £250 for five years. In the same year the church was built, the materials of old Free St. George’s, which stood in Lothian Road, being used for the purpose. A manse was secured, at first in St. Bernard’s Crescent, and afterwards in Saxe-Coburg Place. Mission work was carried on by the congregation in Saunders Street and neighbourhood.

Membership

1870, 500;

1900, 604.

Ministers

Alexander Rodger, 1870-1878

Andrew Keay, 1878 — .

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EDINBURGH – TOLBOOTH

The minister of the Tolbooth Church, William King Tweedie, and many of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They bought the Original Secession Church in Infirmary Street and were in occupation by the month of July. The situation, however, was inconvenient, and in 1851 the building was sold. The congregation worshipped in the Music Hall until the new church in St. Andrew Square was erected. At the union in 1891 of the congregation with that of St. Luke’s, this church also was sold. See EDINBURGH – QUEEN STREET.

Membership

1848, 975; 1890, 267.

Ministers

W. K. Tweedie, D.D., 1843-1863

Alexander Mackenzie, D.D., 1863-1891.

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EDINBURGH – TRON

The members who formed this congregation worshipped for a time after the Disruption in hired halls, being known as the Henderson Church. In 1848 a building in High Street was bought and adapted to church purposes; and the congregation adopted the name of the Free Tron. Here they were joined by a small congregation which met in Leith Wynd, and by the remnant of a Relief congregation which met in Roxburgh Terrace. In 1875 the High Street building was sold, and a large church was erected in Chambers Street. In 1899 the congregation moved farther to the south, having built a new church, and became known as Craigmillar Park Free Church. The first manse was at No. 36 Lauriston Place. This was sold, and another bought at 34 Lygon Road.

Membership

1849, 300; 1881, 290.

Ministers

Andrew Mackenzie 1843

William Simpson (of the Leith Wynd section), 1843

Andrew Milroy, 1844-1873

John Fleming, 1865 — .

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EDINBURGH – VIEWFORTH

The church at the corner of Viewforth and Gilmore Place was built and occupied by the congregation formerly worshipping in Fountainbridge in 1872; the old building having been sold to St. George’s congregation as a centre for mission work. In 1877 a large and commodious hall was erected, and the tower was completed in 1879. In 1898 the church was burned down. It was fully insured. Reconstruction was begun at once, and completed within a year. See EDINBURGH – FOUNTAINBRIDGE.

Membership

1873, 1155;

1900, 1027.

Minister

John Morgan, 1872 — .

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EDINBURGH – WARRENDER PARK

In 1883, under the Barclay kirk-session, services were begun in the growing district south-east of Bruntsfield Links. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1886. The congregation worshipped in Viewpark School, then in an iron church placed in Warrender Park Road. The building in Whitehouse Loan was erected and opened for service in 1892. A manse was acquired at No. 2 Greenhill Terrace.

Membership

1887, 97;

1900, 699.

Ministers

Thomas Currie, M.A., 1887-1898

John Hall, 1899 — .

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EDINBURGH – WEST PORT (CHALMERS’ TERRITORIAL)

This congregation owed its origin to Dr. Chalmers. In 1844 he began work in the West Port. It was estimated that in a population of 2000, about 1500 were utterly without religion. He chose this district for what he called “a model or normal specimen “ of the work of reclamation. He organised a system of district visitation and opened school in the loft of a disused tannery, where also Sabbath services were held. References in his Horae Sabbaticae show how deeply Chalmers was interested in the scheme. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1847, when the West Port Church was opened. In 1884 the large church at the entrance of the West Port was erected, the old church being retained as a mission hall. The first manse was at No. 44 Gilmore Place. This was sold in 1885, and that at No. 19 Chalmers Street was bought in 1888.

Membership

1848, 313;

1900, 1488.

Ministers

William Tasker, 1847-1879

James Jolly, 1873-1886 [Vol.1 says he died 1880.]

John Smith, 7th to 16th April 1887

John S. Bowie, B.D., 1887 — .

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JUNIPER GREEN

Dr. Lewis Balfour (grandfather of R. L. Stevenson), minister of Colinton, and Dr. Robert Jamieson, minister of Currie, were expected to “come out” in 1843, but both stayed in the Established Church. The Free Presbytery of Edinburgh, in July 1843, constituted the elders and people adhering to the Free Church a congregation. A church was built in Juniper Green, about midway between the two parishes. It was called Colinton and Currie Free Church till 1880. Then the church was rebuilt and enlarged, and a hall added; the name being changed to Juniper Green Free Church. The prosperity of a paper mill at Kinleith brought an increase to the population. The district became a favourite residential suburb of Edinburgh. Lord Cockburn of Bonaly sat in the first church as a hearer. Mr. Gladstone’s was the first voice heard in the rebuilt church in 1880. A manse was provided in 1858.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 407.

Ministers

Harry Anderson, 1844-1869

Charles M’Neil, M.A., 1870-1882

Hugh Falconer, B.D., 1882-1892

Norman C. Macfarlane, 1893 — .

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LEITH – ELDER MEMORIAL

A sum of over £8000 was bequeathed by a Leith merchant for the building of a Home Mission church in or near Leith. His trustees erected it on the site of Trinity Church, Hope Street, Leith; and it was opened about the year 1898, under the name of Elder Memorial. See LEITH – TRINITY.

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LEITH – NORTH

The parish was vacant at the Disruption. Over 600 members and nearly all the elders adhered to the Free Church. Their first church, opened in 1844, was at the corner of Coburg Street and North Junction Street. A new church was built in Ferry Road and opened for service in 1859.

Membership

1848, 524;

1900, 1004.

Ministers

William Mackenzie, 1844-1882

Robert Macdonald, D.D., 1857-1893

Thomas Crerar, M.A., 1879 — .

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LEITH – ST. JOHN’S

The minister, James Lewis, and the congregation of St. John’s quoad sacra parish, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They retained possession of the church till 1868, when they were deprived of it in consequence of an action raised against them by the Presbytery of Edinburgh. A new church was then built in Charlotte Street. The district at first was mainly residential, but it changed in character with the growth of the city.

Membership

1845, 503;

1900, 651.

Ministers

James Lewis, D.D., 1843-1850 [Vol.1 says he demitted his charge in 1860.]

J. Grant Mackintosh, 1856-1858

R. Scrimgeour, 1861-1865 [Vol.1 says he left in 1863.]

John Kelman, D.D., 1866 — .

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LEITH – ST. NINIAN’S (originally MARINERS’)

THe minister of Mariners’ Church, John Thomson, with his congregation, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. The church remained in their possession. The name was changed to St. Ninian’s in 1867.

Membership

1848, 264;

1900, 599.

Ministers

John Thomson, M.A., 1843-1881

John Dickson, 1882 — .

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LEITH – SOUTH

Dr. David Thorbum, minister of the second charge of South Leith Parish, “came out” at the Disruption, with a substantial portion of the congregation. The church at St. John’s Place, Leith Links, was built and opened in 1844. It was burned down in 1880, and a new church was opened in 1881 at the foot of Easter Road. A manse was acquired at Claremont Park in 1890. A school was formed at the Disruption, and a building erected at Duncan Place. It was efficiently maintained until 1872, when it was handed over to the Leith School Board. The population in the district considerably increased.

Membership

1848, 455;

1900, 664.

Ministers

David Thorburn, D.D., 1843-1893

James S. Macdonald, 1881-1898

Alfred Coutts, B.D., 1899 — .

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LEITH – TRINITY

In 1846 the minister and some of the congregation of Kirkgate United Associate Church seceded from the United Associate Synod, and attempted along with one or two other ministers to form a new church, the “Calvinistic Secession.” In 1848 Mr. Marshall and his congregation entered the Original Secession Church, and with that body joined the Free Church in 1852. Their first church was in Junction Street, and bore that name. In 1863 they moved to Hope Street, Leith Walk, and assumed the name of Trinity Free Church. See LEITH – ELDER MEMORIAL.

Membership

1870, 280;

1900, 300.

Ministers

William Marshall, 1852-1856

Adam Stuart Muir, D.D., 1859-1886

J. Kennedy Campbell, 1888-1897

Alexander Mackay Sutherland, M.A., 1897 — .

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LIBERTON

For Dr. Begg, minister of Liberton parish, who “came out” at the Disruption, a church was built at Newington (which see). Walter Fairley, minister of the quoad sacra church at Gilmerton, and his congregation, also adhered to the Free Church. At first they worshipped in a hall in Gilmerton. A church was erected in the village of Stenhouse, and opened in 1844. A new church and manse were built at Northfield in 1870; halls being added later. In 1856, with the consent of the Assembly, both Gilmerton and Liberton were included in the district assigned to the congregation, and the name Gilmerton, hitherto borne, was changed to Liberton.

Membership

1847, 115

1900, 288

Ministers

Walter Fairley, 1843-1856

D. K. Guthrie, 1856-1896 [Vol.1 says he resigned in 1890.]

George Dodds, B.D., 1890 — .

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NEWHAVEN

Dr. James Fairbairn, minister of Newhaven quoad sacra parish, and his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued in possession of the church till 1849, when they were deprived of it by the legal decision as to quoad sacra churches. They worshipped in a wooden structure till their new church was opened in 1852. The church was rebuilt and enlarged in 1884. A manse was purchased in 1886. The interesting fishing community was greatly reduced by the introduction of trawling.

Membership

1848, 330;

1900, 771.

Ministers

James Fairbairn, D.D., 1843-1879

David Kilpatrick, B.D., 1879 — .

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PORTOBELLO, ST. PHILIP’S

John Glen, minister of the quoad sacra parish of Portobello, with his session and many of his members, “came out” in 1843, and formed the Free Church congregation of Portobello. They worshipped at firsr in a school in Bath Street, then in the Relief Church, the use of which had been offered them. This building, shortly afterwards, was purchased by the Free Church, the Relief and Free Church congregations uniting. On November 8, 1874, the church was burned down. A new church on a different site was built and opened in 1877. A manse was erected in Abercorn Terrace. The school, built in 1844, behind the original church was taken down and replaced by a church hall. Mission premises were built in Pipe Street in 1862.

Membership

1845, 300;

1900, 558,

Ministers

John Glen, 1843

Robert Cowe, M.A., 1844-1845

Thomas Burns, D.D., 1846-1847

Alexander Philip, 1849-1861

Robert Henderson Ireland, 1861-1881

Patrick William Robertson, M.A., 1881 —

William Ewing, M.A., 1898 — .

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RATHO AND KIRKNEWTON

The ministers of the two parishes of Ratho and Kirknewton remained in the Established Church at the Disruption. For the people adhering to the Free Church, services in each parish were at first provided. Later, the two were combined, and a church erected at Wilkieston, on the Edinburgh-Mid-Calder road, midway between the two parish churches.

Membership

1845, 110;

1900, 163.

Ministers

John Mackenzie, 1844-1853

Hiram Watson, 1853-1891

Frank Gordon, M.A., 1880-1886

Charles H. Todd, M.A., 1886-1890

Ivor J. Roberton, M.A., 1891-1898

William Simpson, 1899 — .

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WEST CALDER

In 1843 services were begun in West Calder for people in the district who adhered to the Free Church. In 1849 an unsuccessful attempt was made to unite West Calder and Livingston in one charge. In 1868 the charge was sanctioned by the Assembly. The development of mining and of the oil trade in the district brought a large increase of population. A preaching station was opened at Addiewell, and an iron church, the gift of the Barclay congregation, was erected there in 1874; about 40 members being transferred to the station from West Calder. The manse was erected at West Calder m 1872, and the church was rebuilt in 1882. In 1892 West Calder was transferred from the Presbytery of Linlithgow to that of Edinburgh.

Membership

1870, 158;

1900, 247.

Ministers

James Iverach, D.D., 1869-1874

Donald Taylor, 1875 — .

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2. PRESBYTERY OF LINLITHGOW

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ABERCORN

Lewis H. Irving, parish minister of Abercorn, and a large part of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843; and that year a new church was built. In 1878 the charge was reduced to the status of a preaching station. Increasing population, owing to the growth of the mining industry, brought an addition to the membership. An attempt was made in 1886 to unite this station with that at Bridgend, about four miles distant, in a single charge, to which the Assembly was willing to give sanction. This proved impracticable. The following year union was effected with the station at South Queensferry, and the charge was sanctioned as Abercorn – South Queensferry. With the assistance of a missionary, regular services were held in both places till 1890. The Free Church then withdrew from South Queensferry, the congregation at Abercorn being maintained. In 1886 the church was rebuilt, and the manse was erected in 1888.

Membership

1848, 80;

1900, 112.

Ministers

Lewis H. Irving, 1843

Archibald Currie, 1844-1877

William Fairbairn, 1887-1900.

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ARMADALE

Mission work was begun by the Bathgate congregation at Armadale in 1860, under Alexander Rodger. The Assembly sanctioned the charge in 1861. The population, depending upon mining, brick-making, and iron and steel works, fluctuated with the condition of these industries.

Membership

1870, 170;

1900, 365.

Ministers

Alexander Rodger, 1861-1866

James Anderson, 1867-1873

Archibald Black, 1874-1880

James Roy, B.D., 1880-1888

Peter Macdonald, B.D., 1888-1896

W. R. Paterson, M.A., 1896 — .

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BATHGATE

Samuel Martin, minister of Bathgate, and a considerable part of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. A church was erected forthwith. Soon afterwards the roof of the church was raised, a gallery was introduced, and a hall was added. The manse was built in 1844, and enlarged later. In 1843 the chief employment was weaving; but this gradually gave way to mining and other industrial enterprises.

Membership

1848, 218;

1900, 390.

Ministers

Samuel Martin, 1843-1850

James Kessen, M.A., 1851-1892

David Kater, M.A., 1892 — .

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BLACKRIDGE

At the Disruption the congregation at Blackridge, a village on the south-west border of Torphichen parish, adhered to the Free Church, and retained their buildings. The status of preaching station was maintained until 1898, when the Assembly sanctioned the charge. The members originally were farmers and farm servants. The opening of the mines changed the character of the population.

Membership

1849, 60;

1900, 124.

Minister

Andrew Brown, 1898 — .

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BORROWSTOUNNESS AND CARRIDEN (BO’NESS)

The minister of this parish did not “come out” in 1843. Services were arranged for the Free Church people in Bo’ness, who at first met for worship on the Links, by the seashore. The charge was sanctioned in 1844, under the name of Bo’ness and Carriden, and a church was built on a site granted by the Duke of Hamilton.

Membership

1848, 192;

1900, 352.

Ministers

Alexander P. Dempster, 1844-1854

Daniel Wilson, 1855-1884

W. Smith Hunter, M.A., 1884 — .

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BROXBURN

Broxburn stands in the parish of Uphall, the minister of which did not “come out” at the Disruption. Provision was made for the people in the district adhering to the Free Church. In the initial stages the congregation owed much to Mr. Joseph Alexander of Broxburn Hall. The Earl of Buchan, who described himself as a “patron of Non-Intrusion principles,” granted a site for a “Free Protesting Kirk”; and the congregation entered the new church in April 1846. Before that, their place of worship had been two houses made into one by the removal of the partitions. The church was enlarged in 1879; and again in 1889, when a hall also was added. The hall was burned down in 1892, and rebuilt and enlarged in 1893. The manse was erected in 1850. In 1894 a mission hall was opened in the village of Uphall. In 1897 the people worshipping in this hall united with those attached to the United Presbyterian Mission to form the Upball congregation. Some 60 or 70 members were transferred from Broxburn to the new congregation. Owing to the rise of the mineral oil industry, the population of the parish very greatly increased from 1863 onwards.

Membership

1848, 115;

1900, 299.

Ministers

William Lyall, 1844-1848

Alexander Luke, 1850-1885

George Sinclair, 1885-1899

Robert Erskine, 1899 — .

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CALDERCRUIX

Sabbath evening meetings were held for a time in Caldercruix, for the convenience of members of Longriggend Church, which was two and a half miles distant. A preaching station was formed. In 1890 the Miners’ Mission lent an iron church, and made a grant to the station. The charge was auctioned by the Assembly in 1893. A new church was built and opened in 1895. A manse was erected in 1898. The opening of the coalfields, and the transference of Messrs. Robert Craig & Sons’ paper works from Newbattle to Caldercruix, led to an increase of population, which reached its maximum about 1893. As mining declined the people were employed mostly in the paper mill and fruit works.

Membership

1893, 120;

1900, 143.

Minister

John Miller, 1893 — .

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CAMELON

Lewis H. Irving, minister of Falkirk Free Church, conducted cottage meetings in Camelon for a time. In 1872 he erected a hall at his own cost, where the work was continued as a preaching station. The charge was sanctioned in 1890. A church was built and opened in 1890. The manse was added in 1899.

Membership

1890, 122;

1900, 243.

Ministers

Robert L. Jaffrey, M.A., 1890-1893

John Muirhead, 1894 —

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CROFTHEAD (LONGRIDGE)

The minister, David Headrick, and congregation of Longridge Original Secession Church joined the Free Church in 1852. After Mr. Headrick’s death, in 1865, no minister was placed at Longridge. The population at Croft had increased rapidly, owing to the growth of the mining industry. A new church was opened there and the congregation transferred from Longridge in 1870. Two years later John C. Robertson was settled as minister. Galleries were afterwards added to the church, and a manse and hall were built

Membership

1859, 100;

1900, 182.

Ministers

David Headrick, 1852-1865

John C. Robertson, 1872-1873

John Russell, B.A., 1873-1877

Robert Kay, 1878 — .

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FALKIRK

The minister of Falkirk parish did not “come out” at the Disruption. The Original Secession congregation, which united with the Church of Scotland in 1839, became the Free Church. A church was built in Garrison Place and opened in 1844. A new church, with ample equipment of halls, etc., was built in New Market Street, and opened in 1896. Three congregations owed their origin to Falkirk Free Church, viz., Shieldhill, Bainsford (N. Falkirk), and Camelon

Membership

1848, 420;

1900, 816.

Ministers

Lewis H. Irving, 1843-1877

Hugh Mair, 1878-1884

Thomas Adamson, D.D., 1884-1888

James B. Johnston, B.D., 1888 — .

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FALKIRK – BAINSFORD

An offshoot from Falkirk Free Church. Meetings were conducted by E. M. Rait, a probationer in the district, for a time in a house in Granary Square, then in old Bainsford School; afterwards in an old barn in Main Street. The North End mission hall was built in 1871. Here a Free Church congregation was formed which received the sanction of the Assembly. The congregation owed much to Mr. Mair, minister of Falkirk Free Church, and two of his elders, Mr. Bow and Mr. Campbell; also to Provost Macpherson of Grangemouth. The church and hall were built in 1880, and the manse in 1894. From 1895 the population in the district greatly increased.

Membership

1879, 71;

1900, 577.

Ministers

Alexander Paterson, M.A., 1878-1889

Charles J. T. Merrylees, M.A., 1890 — .

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GRANGEMOUTH — CHARING CROSS

The quoad sacra parish of Grangemouth was vacant at the Disruption. In September 1843 it was intimated to the Free Church Presbytery of Linlithgow that the Earl of Zetland “had resolved to disconnect the church at Grangemouth from the Establishment, and to give the use of the building to the Free Protesting Church,” on certain conditions. It had been erected as an Extension church five or six years before. The Presbytery gladly accepted the offer. The Free Church congregation worshipped here until 1884, when a new church was built and opened towards the north end of the town, under the name of Charing Cross Church. A number of the members continued to worship in the old building, and formed the West congregation.

Membership

1848, 220;

1900, 608.

Ministers

John Cochrane, 1844-1869

John Sinclair, 1869-1880

George W. Cumming, 1881 — .

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GRANGEMOUTH— WEST

When, in 1884, Grangemouth congregation moved from the church which they had occupied since the Disruption, to the new edifice in the north end of the town, one hundred and thirty-seven members remained in the old building, constituting the nucleus of a new congregation, which received the sanction of the Assembly that same year, under the name of the West Church. The manse was built in 1893. Halls were added later.

Membership

1885, 136;

1900, 352.

Minister

Samuel M. Riddick, M.A., 1885 — .

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HARTHILL

About 1868 the opening of the mines in this district brought a great increase of population. A mission station was begun in 1869. On the petition of the Presbytery the Assembly in 1872 incorporated the station with the congregation at Whitburn as a double charge. To meet the needs of the growing population, however, Harthill was again separated and raised to the status of a sanctioned charge in 1874. The church was built in 1872; the tower and gallery were added in 1875. The manse was erected in 1874.

Membership

1875, 170;

1900, 179.

Ministers

James M’Clelland, 1874-1875

Adam C. Henderson, 1875-1878

James Forrest, M.A., 1878 — .

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KIRKLISTON

The minister of this parish did not “come out” in 1843. A church for the people who adhered to the Free Church was built, and opened in December 1843, largely through the energy and liberality of James Maitland Hog of Newliston. The foundation-stone was the first laid by Dr. Chalmers. The manse was built in 1850. A mission hall was erected at Newbridge.

Membership

1848, 280;

1900, 211.

Ministers

J. C. Burns, D.D., 1843-1892

R. A. Lendrum, M.A., 1890 — .

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LAURIESTON

Laurieston Reformed Presbyterian congregation joined in the union of the Reformed Presbyterian Church and the Free Church of Scotland in 1876. The church was erected in 1789. A policy of site-refusing to Dissenting churches prevailed in the district. The only available site was obtained by feuing a portion of two gardens in a narrow back row. Unfortunately, in 1863, when the church was rebuilt, the old disadvantageous position was retained. The congregation has always had to contend with this hindrance to its prosperity.

Membership

1878, 135;

1900, 211.

Minister

James Hunter, B.D., 1876 — . [Vol.1 does not make clear that he was ordained to the Reformed Presbyterian congregation here in 1870 and only joined the Free Church in 1876.]

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LINLITHGOW

The people adhering to the Free Church in Linlithgow were organised as a congregation, and worshipped in “the Tan Loft” from June 1843 till August 1844. The first church was opened in September 1844. A new church was erected in 1873, and enlarged in 1900. The manse was built in 1857. The population suffered diminution through loss of the boot and shoe contract for the army aad navy, about 1880, and later, through the collapse of the Linlithgow Oil Company. The land, extending to several acres, on which the manse stands, was gifted to the congregation before 1900. The site of the church was virtually also a gift, the feu-duty being only l0s. per annum.

Membership

1848,132;

1900, 373.

Ministers

John Baillie, D.D., 1843-1853

W. Scrymgeour, 1854-1867

William Millar Nicolson, D.Sc., 1867-1882

Alexander Mitchell, M.A., 1883 — .

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LIVINGSTON

John Laing, minister of the parish, and a considerable portion of his congregation, “came out” at the Disruption. For some years the unfortunate state of Mr. Laing’s health hindered progress. By decision of Presbytery the church was built in Livingston. After Mr. Laing’s resignation in 1847, for four years the congregation were not in a position, financially, to call a minister. In 1849 an unsuccessful attempt was made to unite the congregation with that at West Calder. In 1851 a minister was again settled in Livingston, and a manse was built shortly afterwards. The church was rebuilt on the same site and opened in 1858. The district, originally agricultural, became the centre of the mineral oil industry.

Membership

1855, 105;

1900, 108.

Ministers

John Laing, 1843-1847

C. L. C. Tulloch, 1851-1874 [Vol.1 says he was ordained 1858.]

R. Sanders, B.D., 1875-1878

J. A. Kerr Bain, D.D., 1879 — .

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LONGRIGGEND

This congregation was started in 1876 as Roughrigg Mission, under the care of Slamannan Free Church session. It was placed on the footing of a preaching station in 1882. In 1888 the Assembly sanctioned the charge; and within two years a church and manse were built at Longriggend. To form the congregation at Caldercruix 105 members were disjoined in 1890.

Membership

1889, 126;

1900, 220.

Minister

R. P. Dickie, M.A., 1888 — .

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POLMONT

The minister of the parish did not “come out” in 1843. The people who adhered to the Free Church were organised into a congregation by Robert Cunningham, of Blair Lodge School, who held service in the school classrooms. The charge was sanctioned in 1845. Mr. Cunningham was both pastor and teacher till 1846.

Membership

1848, 150;

1900, 218.

Ministers

Robert Cunningham, M.A., 1843-1846 [Vol.1 records him as having a seat on the Presbytery till 1851.]

James Boyd, M.A., 1846-1867

John Simpson, 1868-1873

James Anderson, 1873 — .

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SHIELDHILL

An offshoot from Falkirk Free Church, this congregation was begun as a mission station, in 1861, under the name of Blackbraes. The population increased with the opening of new coal pits, and a second place of worship was erected in 1887 at Shieldhill, about 1½ mile distant. Two wings were subsequently added to this church. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1890. A manse was built in 1892. The population depended mainly upon the mining industry.

Membership

1891, 136;

1900, 206.

Minister

A. Fleming Kerr, 1890 — .

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SLAMANNAN

The minister of the parish did not “come out” in 1843; but many of his people adhered to the Free Church, and a congregation was speedily organised. A church was built at Pirnie Lodge, a mile east of Slamannan village, and opened in 1844. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1845. A new church was built in Slamannan village, and opened in 1861. This church was burned down on Sabbath, March 20, 1864, but was soon rebuilt. A manse was secured in the village. Originally an agricultural district, the mining industry brought a great increase of population. The closing of the pits, as the coal was wrought out, had a depressing effect upon the district.

Membership

1848, 135;

1900, 199.

Ministers

William Eyval, 1847-1861

William Tullo, 1861-1874

Archibald Reid, M.A., 1875-1892

G. D. Strathairn, M.A., 1893-1898 [Vol.1 says he retired in 1893.]

William R. Stewart, M.A., 1898 — .

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TORPHICHEN

Dr. Hetherington, minister of the parish, and his congregation, “ came out” at the Disruption. Materials for building a new church had been collected before that event. In the month of August following the church was opened for worship, and the minister took possession of the new manse. A school was built and opened in October. Torphichen was the ancient seat of the Knights of Jerusalem. With the development of industries in the district the old agricultural population gradually gave place to a new industrial class.

Membership

1848, 150;

1900, 117.

Ministers

W. M. Hetherington, D.D., 1843-1844

John Duns, D.D., 1844-1864

Robert MacMorran. 1865-1868

William Young, 1868-1871

William Jeffrey, M.D., L.R.C.P. (Edin.), 1872-1875

A. F. Murray, M.A., 1875 — .

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UPHALL

In 1894 a mission was begun in the village of Uphall by Broxbum Free Church. In 1897 the mission joined with the station of the United Presbyterian Church in the village, to form the Uphall Free Church; and the charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1898.

Membership

1898, 102;

1900, 110.

Minister

George Millar, 1898 — .

Documents relating to this congregation have been made available by a researcher and anyone interested should get in touch through the Contact page to get access to these documents.

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WHITBURN

The Original Secession congregation joined the Free Church in 1852. A new church was built and opened in 1857. The original manse was enlarged and modernised. In 1872 the Assembly incorporated with this congregation that of the station at Harthill; but they were separated again in 1874. The population greatly increased with the opening of new coalfields in the district.

Membership

1859, 87;

1900, 185.

Ministers

Robert Shaw, D.D., 1852-1863

John Macknight, 1863 — .

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3. PRESBYTERY OF BIGGAR AND PEEBLES

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BROUGHTON

Hamilton Paul, minister of the parish, a man of eccentric genius, did not “come out” in 1843. The church was in a somewhat disorganised condition. When the people who adhered to the Free Church formed a congregation the Presbytery had to appoint assessors to the session. Local elders were soon elected and ordained. The congregation worshipped for about a year in the Rachan barn. The church was built and opened in 1844. It was remodelled in 1892. The manse was erected in 1844.

Membership

1848, 260;

1900, 152.

Ministers

William Welsh, D.D., 1843-1892

Alexander Gray, 1885 — .

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CULTER

James Proudfoot, minister of the parish, with three elders and a considerable portion of his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. At first progress was hindered by the distance at which the minister had to live from the church. At length church and manse were erected on adjoining sites. The church at Culter served the whole district. People came from Biggar, where there was no Free Church, to worship at Culter. Part of the congregation did not join in the Union of 1900.

Membership

1848, 240; 1870, 228;

1900, figures not available.

Ministers

James Proudfoot, 1843-1876

Colin A. Bannatyne, M.A., 1876 — .

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ELLSRIDGEHILL

Services were begun in Ellsridgehill immediately after the Disruption. It was in the centre of five parishes in which there was then no Free Church. In response to a petition from the people, the Assembly in 1845 sanctioned a regular charge here. The old Antiburghers’ meeting-house was purchased and repaired. This served as their place of worship until the new church was built and opened in 1872. The manse was erected in 1878. Mr. Patteson, the first minister, bequeathed his library for the use of his successors in office. The population of the district, which is wholly rural, tended steadily to decrease.

Membership

1848, 119;

1900, 101.

Ministers

Edward Patteson, 1846-1873

James Cooper, 1874-1898 [Vol.1 says he resigned 1896.]

Adam Renwick, M.A., 1896 — .

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INNERLEITHEN

Patrick Booth, minister of the parish, adhered to the Established Church in 1843. A Free Church congregation was formed, however, and a minister was settled in 1844. Sunday schools were conducted at Innerleithen, Glenormiston, Henderland, and Whitehope. The church, built in 1844, was remodelled and enlarged in 1878. The manse was erected in 1876.

Membership

1848, 120;

1900, 191.

Ministers

John Montgomery, M.A., 1844-1865

Andrew Forrest, 1866-1869 [Vol.1 gives no date for him leaving here.]

Charles D. Kay, D.D., 1870-1880

Alexander Mackenzie, 1880 — .

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KIRKURD

Walter Paterson, minister of the parish, with his congregation, “came out” in 1843. For a time they worshipped in the old mansion house of Scotston. Sir Thomas Gibson Carmichael, Bart., of Castle Craig, to whom the congregation was indebted for much kindness, gave a site, in the parish of Newlands, where church and manse were soon erected. Here, as in other rural districts, the population showed a tendency to decline.

Membership

1843, 173;

1900, 131.

Ministers

Walter Paterson, 1843-1849

Robert Taylor, 1850-1858

John MacGregor, 1859-1864

A. N. Mackray, M.A., 1865-1867

J. R. Caird, M.A., 1868-1877

David Mitchell, 1877-1896

W. J. Couper, M.A., 1897 — .

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PEEBLES

Neither minister nor office-bearers “came out” in Peebles at the Disruption. A number of the people, however, adhered to the Free Church, and these, with others from the surrounding parishes, formed themselves into a congregation, over which a minister was settled in October 1843. A church was opened in School Brae in 1845. A manse was secured in Tweed Green in 1846. A new church was built and opened in Eastgate in 1872. The old manse was sold in 1892, and a new one built in Kerfield Road.

Membership

1848, 151;

1900, 353.

Ministers

William Wallace Duncan, M.A., 1843-1864

John Macgregor, M.A., 1864-1869

Henry Carmichael, M.A., 1870-1879

Robert Ballantine, M.A., 1880 — .

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SKIRLING

Dr. William Hanna, minister of the parish, “came out” at the Disruption, with the bulk of his congregation (see Annals of the Disruption, pp. 123, 124). The congregation was vigorously organised; and the church was built in 1843.

Membership

1848, 150;

1900, 83.

Ministers

William Hanna, D.D., 1843-1848 [Vol.1 says he was translated to St John’s – Edinburgh in 1850, as does the St. John’s entry.]

Isaac Barret, 1849-1877

James Angus, 1878-1883

D. S. McDonald, 1883-1887

Thomas Ramage, 1887-1888

Matthew White, B.D., 1889-1896

A. P. Davidson, M.A., 1896 — .

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4. PRESBYTERY OF DALKEITH

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CARLOPS

Services were for a time held in this village, and in 1846 it was put on the footing of a preaching station. The church was built and opened in February 1851. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1860. The closing of a local pit, quarries, etc., and the disappearance of crofts and small holdings, caused a decline of population.

Membership

1860, 108;

1900, 106.

Ministers

W. W. Aitken, 1860-1895 [Vol.1 makes no mention of him leaving here.]

G. W. Taylor, M.A., 1895 — .

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COCKPEN

Under Thomas Pitcairn, minister of the parish, who, with one elder, “came out” in 1843, a Free Church congregation was formed. Church, manse, and school were built in the village of Bonnyrigg, and, later, a mission hall. The church served the two parishes of Cockpen and Lasswade. The development of carpet-making and coal-mining led to increase of population, especially between 1875 and 1895, and other Free churches were opened in the surrounding district, e.g. at Loanhead and Gorebridge.

Membership

1848, 301;

1900, 390.

Ministers

Thomas Pitcairn, D.D., 1843-1854

James Hamilton, M.A., 1855-1877

John F. M’Rae, 1877-1884

R. T. Loudon, B.D., 1885 — .

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DALKEITH

James Monteith, senior minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. A meeting had been held in December 1842 to prepare for possible contingencies, so that, at the Disruption, there was an organised congregation to represent the Free Church in Dalkeith. Special service was rendered at this stage by Peter Steel, M.A., rector of the grammar school, who had to resign his appointment because he adhered to the Free Church. The congregation worshipped at first in the United Associate Secession Church, kindly granted for the purpose. The new church was built and opened in December 1843. It was remodelled in 1845 and reseated in 1877. A school was erected in 1845, and a manse in 1863. The congregation carried on a mission at Newton Grange, which became a sanctioned charge in 1884, under the name of Newbattle.

Membership

1848, 450;

1900, 408.

Ministers

James Monteith, 1843

John Macfarlane, D.D., 1844-1875

John M. Sloan, M.A., 1864-1868

D.D. Bannerman, D.D., 1869-1879,

N. D. Maclachlan, B.D., 1880 — .

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GOREBRIDGE

At the Disruption the people who had been gathered in connection with a church extension movement, under a missionary, in Stobhill, nearly all adhered to the Free Church; and the missionary, then in ill-health, resigned. For some time services were held in a subscription school in the village. In 1847 a catechist was appointed. The following year, a house, in which the meetings were held, was purchased, and a day school begun. The church was built and opened in 1859. The Assembly sanctioned the charge, in 1861, as “Stobhill Church, Gorebridge.” Later, the name was to “The Free Church of Scotland, Gorebridge.” A new church was opened in Gorebridge in 1882. The manse was erected in 1877. The construction of the North British Railway Waverley Route, and the opening of the Arniston pits, brought a considerable increase of population to Gorebridge.

Membership

1866, 102;

1900, 222.

Ministers

James Spence, 1862-1866

John Gray, M.A., 1866-1873

A. Gillon Macalpine, 1873-1884 [Vol.1 says 1883.]

Hector M’Lean, B.D., 1884 — .

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LOANHEAD

After the Disruption occasional services were arranged for Loanhead. In 1845, through the generosity of Mrs. Smith of Dunesk, a missionary was appointed, and services were held in a schoolroom in the village. A church was begun in 1851. The charge was sanctioned by the Assembly in 1858. The new church was built and opened in 1862, a hall being added in 1900. The manse was bought in 1883. Coal-mining and paper-making were the main industries of the place; and fluctuations in them affected the membership of the congregation.

Membership

1861, 130;

1900, 283.

Ministers

John Simpson, 1858-1863 [Under Roxburgh it says he was translated 1862.]

A. C. Kay, 1863-1880

John C. Grant, M.A., 1880-1895

W. Johnston, M.A., 1895 — .

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MUSSELBURGH

The minister of Inveresk parish did not “come out” in 1843; but four elders and a large number of his members adhered to the Free Church, and were at once organised as a congregation. The church was built shortly after the Disruption, on a prominent site on the Mall. It was rebuilt in 1889, a clock and tower being added. A house was at first rented for the minister; then “Providence Hall” in Fisherrow was secured; finally a manse was bought in Linkfield, beside Loretto School, in 1857. The introduction of the railway, the growth of Inveresk paper-mills, and the net factory, and the development of the mining industry all tended to the increase of the population of Musselburgh. In early days many of the fisher folk attended the Free Church, who, later, were attracted by the Scottish Coast Mission.

Membership

1859, 386;

1900, 306.

Ministers

John R. Glass, 1843-1855

J. D. Paxton, 1858-1864

William Wilson, M.A., 1864-1875

Alexander Wright, M.A., 1876 — .

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NEWBATTLE

This congregation took its rise in Newton Grange Mission, begun by Dalkeith Free Church in 1874. The Home Mission Committee provided an iron church. In 1880 a new church was built and opened for service. The Assembly sanctioned the charge in 1884. The manse was erected in 1886, and halls were added in 1891. The removal of Newbattle paper-mills in 1890 adversely affected the congregation. After that date the population became largely mining in character. The congregation profited greatly by a special work of grace which began in the closing months of 1889.

Membership

1885, 123;

1900, 285.

Minister

Alexander Hardie, 1884 — .

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ORMISTON AND PATHHEAD

The minister and congregation at Ormiston “came out” in 1843. The church was erected in 1843-1844. The minister of Heriot and some of his people adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. No site could be obtained at Heriot, so Mr. Court was transferred to Pathhead, where he formed a congregation, and a church was built. When Mr. Court retired in 1861, Pathhead was reduced to a station. In 1866 the minister of Ormiston also retired, and the two congregations were united under one minister. A vacancy occurred in 1873, and in 1874 both were reduced to stations. In 1875 sanction was restored to Ormiston. Pathhead was entirely suppressed. A manse was purchased at Ormiston in 1891.

Membership

Ormiston—1848, 151;

1900, 149. Pathhead—1848, 140.

Ministers

Ormiston

James Bannerman, D.D., 1843-1849

George Lewis, B.A., 1849-1865.

Pathhead

Robert Court, 1843-1861 [Vol.1 became senior minister in 1861, died 1870.]

Ormiston and Pathhead

John Russel, B.A., 1865-1873.

Ormiston

James Brodie, 1875-1887

Thomas Robertson, 1887 — .

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PATHHEAD. See ORMISTON.

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PENICUIK

The minister of the parish had identified himself with the Non-Intrusion party up to a certain point; but he did not “come out” in 1843. The people adhering to the Free Church were organised as a congregation. They enjoyed influential support in the district, especially that of the Cowan family. They met for worship in the Friendly Society’s Hall. The local proprietor, Sir George Clark, refused a site. Only a very unshapely piece of ground could be obtained; here the church was built, and opened for service in October 1844. A school and schoolhouse were built in 1845, and a manse in 1847. A more suitable site was secured and a new church erected in 1861. The preaching station at Carlops was under the charge of Penicuik session until it became a sanctioned charge.

Membership

1848, 180;

1900, 473.

Ministers

Andrew Mackenzie, 1843-1871

H. A. Stewart, 1854-1893

S. R. Crockett, 1886-1894

Robert T. Jack, M.A., 1895 — .

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ROSLIN

The minister of Roslin quoad sacra parish, three of his elders, and two hundred members adhered to the Free Church in 1843. During the summer of that year they met for worship in the burying-ground. Accommodation was secured for a time in a subscription school. A house in the village with a large garden was purchased, and in the garden the first Free Church was built. A new church on another site was built and opened in 1881. For five years the minister’s dwelling consisted of two small cottages thrown into one. The local industries of coal-mining, powder-making, and carpet-weaving afforded regular occupation for the residents.

Membership

1848, 250;

1900, 229.

Ministers

David Brown, 1843-1870

Robert Thomson, LL. D., 1870-1875

David Barnetson, 1875 — .

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TEMPLE AND CARRINGTON

At Temple (the church of the Knights Templar) neither of the ministers “came out” in 1843. The people adhering to the Free Church in the district were organised as a congregation in November 1843. The church and hall were erected in 1843-1844. A schoolhouse was built in 1864, and a manse some years later. In 1895 the mining village of Rosewell was put under the charge of the minister of Temple. From 1843 the population of the parish steadily declined.

Membership

1848, 180;

1900, 70.

Ministers

James Duncan, 1844-1879

Peter Yule, 1878-1894

Robert Gilmour, 1895 — .

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5. PRESBYTERY OF HADDINGTON AND DUNBAR

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COCKBURNSPATH

In the two adjoining parishes of Cockburnspath and Oldhamstocks, the minister of the latter, Robert Moore, adhered to the Establishment. Andrew Baird, minister of the former, “came out,” and suffered much real persecution for his principles. A site for a church was refused, and his dwelling-house was most inadequate. Attempts were made to render meetings for worship difficult, if not impossible. A feu was given by a staunch adherent, in spite of strong adverse influence, in the village of Oldhamstocks, about three miles from Cockburnspath. There the first church and manse were built. In 1890, a suitable site having been obtained, a new church and manse were erected at Cockburnspath.

Membership

1848, 170;

1900, 70.

Ministers

Andrew Baird, 1843-1845

Andrew Wallace, 1846-1874 [Vol.1 says he became senior minister in 1874 and died in 1884.]

James Dewar, 1874-1878

Alexander M’Neill, 1878-1881

David Hewitt, M.A., 1882 — .

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COCKENZIE

Archibald Lorimer, minister of the quoad sacra church at Cockenzie, with his congregation, adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. They continued to use the church until 1849, when they were evicted. They found shelter in a temporary structure, and then in the church hall, until the church was completed. The quoad sacra building stood vacant till 1877. Cockenzie was disjoined from Haddington Presbytery and added to that of Dalkeith in 1843, but was restored to Haddington in 1892.

Membership

1848, 165;

1900, 207.

Ministers

Archibald Lorimer, 1843-1869

James Kilgour, 1870-1887

William Ogg, M.A., 1888 — .

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DIRLETON

Dr. John Ainslie, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. The congregation worshipped for a time in a barn at Castlemains. A site was speedily secured, and a church erected. The minister was lodged for two years, without rent, in the house of Mr. Cochrane of Muirfield, who lived for the time in one of his own cottages. The manse was built in 1854.

Membership

1848, 180;

1900, 199.

Ministers

John Ainslie, D.D., 1843-1847

W. H. Hewitson, 1848-1850

John Z. Huie, 1851-1853

John H. Howson, 1854-1895

James Gracie, B.D., 1890 — .

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DUNBAR

William Sorley, minister of the quoad sacra church at Belhaven, and all his congregation, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to occupy the church, under the name of “Belhaven Free Church,” until it was claimed by the Established Church in 1849. Then they moved to Dunbar, where they built a church in 1850. A manse was erected in 1854. Membership fell with the decay of the rural population. Dunbar, however, became a popular seaside resort, and an influx of visitors increased the work in summer.

Membership

1848, 370;

1900, 234.

Ministers

William Sorley, 1843

James S. Dodds, 1844-1885

Joseph Agnew, 1886 — .

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GARVALD

Selby Ord Dods, minister of the parish, and most of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped for a time in a barn. A site having been secured in the village, a church was erected in 1843, and soon afterwards a manse. Later, the interior of the church was renewed, and a tower added. The membership declined owing to decay of the population.

Membership

1848, 290;

1900, 102.

Ministers

Selby Ord Dods, 1843-1846

John Fulton, M.A., 1846-1860

Robert M. Webster, 1861-1867

D. A. Beattie, 1867 — .

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HADDINGTON — KNOX’S

The Original Secession Church of Haddington joined the Free Church in 1852, taking the name of “Knox’s Free Church.” At the death of the minister, William White, the congregation was dissolved. See HADDINGTON, ST. JOHN’S.

Minister

William White, 1852-1871.

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HADDINGTON — ST. JOHN’S

Dr. Lorimer, senior minister of the parish church, and sixty or seventy of his people; John W. Wright, minister of the quoad sacra church of St. John’s, and the great majority of his members, including all the elders, adhered to the Free Church in 1843. All were united in one congregation under the joint pastorate of Dr. Lorimer and Mr. Wright They worshipped in St. John’s Church till it was claimed by the Established Church in 1849, after which it long stood vacant. A church and manse were built on an adjacent feu. The Original Secession Church of Haddington joined the Free Church in 1852, and became known as “Knox’s Free Church.” In 1872 it was dissolved, and thenceforward the Free Church in Haddington was represented by one strong congregation. A mission hall was built in 1878. A new church and hall were erected in 1890. The old church and manse were sold in 1896, when a new manse was purchased.

Membership

1848, 475;

1900, 319.

Ministers

Robert Lorimer, LL. D., 1843-1848

John W. Wright, M.A., 1843-1872

D. W. Anderson, B.D., 13th to 29th March 1873

J. Matthew, B.D., 1873 — .

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HUMBIE

James S. Dodds, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. A church was built on a site secured at Upper Keith, temporary accommodation being found in a barn. With the decrease of the population the congregation declined, and from 1884 to 1888 it was conducted as a preaching station. The interior of the church was rearranged in 1877. The manse was built in 1851.

Membership

1848, 190;

1900, 81.

Ministers

James S. Dodds, 1843-1844

John Henry, 1845-1873

George Hay, M.A., 1874-1880

J. S. Miller, 1880-1884

M. D. Finlayson, 1888 — .

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INNERWICK

The minister of Innerwick “came out” in 1843, and, on leaving the manse, had to remove to Dunbar. After long delay a site for church and manse was secured at some distance from the village. These circumstances were adverse to the prosperity of the congregation, which suffered also by the decrease of the population in the district. In 1896 it was reduced to a preaching station. The charge was, however, again sanctioned by the Assembly in 1899. The church was renovated in 1898. Farm servants have always formed the bulk of the congregation.

Membership

1848, 168;

1900, 91.

Ministers

Adam Foreman, M.A., 1843-1844 [Vol.1 has his surname as Forman]

John Freeland, M.A., 1845-1896 [Vol.1 says this was the year in which he became senior minister.]

Archibald Auld, ordained probationer, 1896-1899; inducted, 1899.

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NORTH BERWICK

The minister of the parish had shown sympathy with the Non-Intrusion movement, but did not “come out” at the Disruption. James Crawford, farmer at “The Rhodes,” an enthusiastic Free Churchman, began services in a granary on the south side of Forth Street. A probationer was appointed as supply, and Mr. Ainslie of Dirleton also lent assistance. John M’Cosh accepted a call to the charge in November 1843. His ordination was delayed owing to illness, which finally compelled him to withdraw his acceptance. A settlement was effected in September 1844, the month in which the new church was opened. The church was reconstructed in 1875, and almost entirely rebuilt and enlarged in 1889. The manse, built in 1852, was enlarged in 1887, and again in 1898. The congregation grew with the growth of the town. James Crawford, W.S., Town Clerk of North Berwick, and Depute Clerk of Assembly, was the son of James Crawford of “The Rhodes.”

Membership

1848, 100;

1900, 352.

Ministers

James B. Hay, 1844-1845

Allan Thomson, 1846-1851

John Shewan, 1850-1893

J. Davidson, M.A., 1886 — .

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PENCAITLAND

Dr. Makellar, minister of the parish, and a minority of his congregation, “came out” in 1843. They worshipped for a time in a large granary. A site was speedily secured and a church built at Fountainhall. The minister lived in part of the old house of Fountainhall; both church and minister’s residence being thus some distance from the village. Through the kindness of a member, Mr. Trevelyan of Tyneholm, the hall in the village was granted for evening services. The congregation suffered from decline of the population owing to the closing of a colliery, and other circumstances. It was reduced to a preaching station in 1882; but in 1891 the charge was again sanctioned. The manse was built in 1900.

Membership

1848, 100;

1900, 109.

Ministers

Angus Makellar, D.D., 1843-1844

William Makellar, B.A., 1843-1845

Samuel Robertson, 1845-1882

Thomas C. Still, M.A., 1891 — .

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PRESTONKIRK

John Thomson, minister of the parish, with three elders and many of his people, “came out” in 1843, and formed the Free Church congregation. Mr. Christie of Markle made over to the Free Church a house and garden which he had purchased in anticipation of the Disruption. The church was built in the garden. The house was transformed into a “pend” giving entrance from the street. The Secession congregation kindly granted the use of their building for worship at convenient hours, until November 1843, when the church was opened. It was built of stones from an old distillery, on the site of which the manse was erected in 1846. The tower was added to the church about 1881, the bell being gifted by Mr. Charles Scott, in memory of his brother Alexander. In 1887 some cottages were removed to open up the front of the church. In 1897 the manse was enlarged and improved. The population of the district, purely agricultural, considerably declined.

Membership

1870, 294;

1900, 274.

Ministers

John Thomson, 1843-1889

Thomas Adamson, D.D., 1876-1884

R. G. Rodger, M.A., 1885 — .

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PRESTONPANS

W. Bruce Cunningham, minister of the parish, “came out” in 1843. Among those who accompanied him there was but one local proprietor, Mr. Robert Hislop, to whose sympathy and help the church was greatly indebted. At first worship was held in barns the use of which was granted by Mr. Hislop. In 1844 the church was built on a site which Mr. Hislop had presented. In addition, he gifted the manse and its site. In 1878 the church was reconstructed; in 1886 the roof was renewed; and in 1891 a gallery was added. The development of mining brought an increase in the industrial population, among whom mission work was begun by Dr. Patrick R. Mackay. The Presbyteries of Haddington and Dunbar were united in 1843, and Prestonpans was transferred from the Presbytery of Haddington to that of Dalkeith. In 1864 it was restored to Haddington.

Membership

1848, 148;

1900, 301.

Ministers

W. Bruce Cunningham, 1843-1878

P. R. Mackay, D.D., 1879-1898 [Vol.1 gives no date for terminating his ministry.]

Donald Iverach, M.A., 1899 — .

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SALTON AND BOLTON

The minister of Salton parish and many of his people adhered to the Free Church in 1843. At first they worshipped in a large barn at Samuelston Mains. Church and manse were soon erected. The minister of the neighbouring parish of Bolton also “came out,” but owing to illness was unable for duty. Some of his people attended worship at Gifford; but most of them went to Samuelston Mains, and became identified with the congregation there.

Membership

1848, 235;

1900,78.

Ministers

[John Abernethy, M.A., 1843. See Vol.1]

P. Fairbairn, 1843-1852

Arthur Thomson, 1853-1874

Thomas M. Oatts, 1874-1875

James Barles, 1875-1878

Colin S. Murray, 1878-1894

Horatius N. Bonar, 1896 — .

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TRANENT

The parish ministers of Tranent and Gladsmuir did not “come out “ in 1843. The people adhering to the Free Church in these parishes formed the congregation in Tranent. A minister was settled in August 1843; and the same year the church was erected, much free labour being given. It was repaired and reseated in 1898. The school, later used as a hall, was built in 1846, and reconstructed in 1887. The manse was built in 1849.

Membership

1848, 240;

1900, 171.

Ministers

John Paterson, B.A., 1843-1897

Hugh Miller Williamson, 1888 — .

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YESTER

John Thomson, minister of the parish, “came out” at the Disruption with a large body of his people. Services were held at first in a temporary erection of wood and canvas. The church was built and opened for service in October 1843. A new church was erected in 1880, the old building having been purchased by Yester School Board. The manse was built in 1846. The population of the parish, 1069 in 1843, decreased to 720 in 1900.

Membership

1848, 312;

1900, 175.

Ministers

John Thomson, D.D., 1843-1845

T. M’Kenzie Fraser, 1845-1856

Malcolm Firth, 1857-1859

James Stuart, 1860-1874

Arthur Thomson, 1874-1881

Alexander Aitken, 1881-1893 [Vol.1 says 1894.]

James Crocket, M.A., B.Sc., 1894 — .

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